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Zhe TRnivex&itv of Chicago 

FOUNDED BY JOHN D. ROCKEFELLER 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

Vol XXIX JUNE 15, 1929 No. 27 

THE 
MEDICAL SCHOOLS 

1929-30 



2098 



in 



THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO PRESS 
CHICAGO • ILLINOIS 



CALENDAR FOR THE YEAR 1929-30 



June 8 
June 9 
June 10 
June 10 
June 
June 



m 

Tune 15 # • 
Jyne 17 • 
Jun* 17-22 

Ju$.l3 



Saturday 

# Sunday 

# Monday 
Mondty 
Ttie#dliy 
Tuesday . 

"Wednesday 

Saturday 
Monday 

Thursday 
Saturday 



July 23 
July 24 
July 24 
July 25 
Aug. 25 
Aug. 29 
Aug. 30 

Aug. 30 Friday 

Sept. 3-6 

Sept. 23-28 

Sept. 26 Thursday 



Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Sunday 

Thursday 

Friday 



Sept. 27 
Sept. 28 
Sept. 30 
Sept. 30 
Oct. 5 



Nov. 28 

Dec. 9-13 

Dec. 15 

Dec. 17 

Dec. 18 

Dec. 19 

Dec. 20 

Dec. 20 



Friday 

Saturday 

Monday 

Monday 

Saturday 



Thursday 

Sunday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Friday 



1929 

Alumni Day 
Convocation Sunday 
College Day 



u 



4- 



7'l! 



Examinations for the Spring Quarter 

Summer Convocation / 

Examinations for the Spring Quarter • ' 

Spring Quarter ends 

Registration for the Summer Quarter 

Summer Quarter begins 

Examinations of the College Entrance Examination Board 

Independence Day: a holiday 

Special Examinations for removal of deficiencies (work reported 

conditioned or incomplete) incurred during the last quarter of 

residence 

Examinations for the First Term of the Summer Quarter 

First Term of the Summer Quarter ends 
Second Term of the Summer Quarter begins 
Convocation Sunday 

Examinations for the Second Term of the Summer Quarter 

Autumn Convocation 
Summer Quarter ends 
Examinations for Admission 
Freshman Week 

Registration for the Autumn Quarter of returning undergraduate 
students 

Registration for the Autumn Quarter in all schools and colleges 

Autumn Quarter begins 

All classes meet 

Special Examinations for all students returning for the Autumn 

Quarter who incurred deficiencies (work reported conditioned or 

incomplete) in the last quarter of residence 
Thanksgiving Day: a holiday 
Examinations for Admission 
Convocation Sunday 
Winter Convocation 

Examinations for the Autumn Quarter 

Autumn Quarter ends 



Jan. 2 
Jan. 25 



Feb. 12 
Feb. 22 
Mar. 3-7 
Mar. 16 
Mar. 18 
Mar. 19 
Mar. 20 
Mar. 21 
Mar. 21 
Mar. 22-30 
Mar . 31 
Apr. 26 



May 9 
May 30 
June 7 
June 8 
June 9 
June 9 
June 10 
June 10 

June 11 



Thursday 
Saturday 



Wednesday 
Saturday 

Sunday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Friday 

Monday 
Saturday 



Friday 

Friday 

Saturday 

Sunday 

Monday 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 



1930 

Winter Quarter begins 

Special Examinations for removal of deficiencies (work reported 

conditioned or incomplete) incurred during the last quarter of 

residence 
Lincoln's Birthday: a holiday 
Washington's Birthday: a holiday 
Examinations for Admission 
Convocation Sunday 
Spring Convocation 

Examinations for the Winter Quarter 

Winter Quarter ends 

Quarterly Recess 

Spring Quarter begins 

Special Examinations for removal of deficiencies (work reported 

conditioned or incomplete) incurred during the last quarter of 

residence 
Prize Scholarship Examinations for high-school seniors 
Memorial Day: a holiday 
Alumni Day 
Convocation Sunday 
College Day 

Examinations for the Spring Quarter 

Summer Convocation 
Examinations for the Spring Quarter 
Spring Quarter ends 



Published by the University of Chicago in twenty-eight issues annually, semimonthly August to Decem- 
ber, and trimonthly January to June inclusive. Entered as second-class matter September 26, 1927, at 
the Post-office at Chicago, Illinois, under the Act of August 24, 1912. Accepted for mailing at special rate 
of postage provided for in Section 1103, Act of October 3, 1917. Authorized February 14, 1924. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



PAJE 

General Information ' , > 2 

Graduate School of Medicine of the Ogden Graduate School of Science 3 

Rush Medical College . : 8 

Rush Post-Graduate Medical School 15 

Boards 16 

General Regulations 17 

Admission: 17 

Requirements for Admission 18 

Admission with Advanced Standing . 20 

Registration 20 

Continuance 21 

Deficiencies in Medical Courses . . . . . . 21 

Degrees: 

Doctor of Medicine . 21 

1. In the Graduate School of Medicine of the Ogden Graduate School of 
Science 21 

2. In Rush Medical College 22 

Master of Science 26 

Doctor of Philosophy 27 

General Information for Students Entering the Junior and Senior 

Years at Rush Medical College 29 

Fees and Expenses 98 

Fellowships 101 

Scholarships 104 

Libraries, Laboratories, and Museums 108 

Alumni Association of Rush Medical College 115 

List of Masters of Science, Doctors of Medicine, Doctors of Philosophy, 

1928-29 115 

List of Students 129 



1 THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO 



, . GENERAL INFORMATION 

* r r C 

c c f 

c The" Mbdical Schools of the University include (1) The Graduate School of Medicine 
<of the Ogden Graduate School of Science, (2) Rush Medical College, and (3) The Rush 
I*b$£-Gi&duate School of Medicine. 

The Graduate School of Medicine of the Ogden Graduate School of Science was 
organized in 1924. Its purpose is to serve the Medical Sciences by research and teach- 
ing. It is a part of the Ogden Graduate School of Science and its work is done on the 
University Quadrangles in close contact with that of other scientific departments — 
Physics, Chemistry, Biology, etc. Departments devoted to the pre-clinical sciences 
were provided for when the University was founded, and established shortly thereafter. 
Their primary purposes are the development of the sciences and the training of scien- 
tists. Since 1899 they have included among the courses offered all those required in 
the first two years of work leading to the degree of Doctor of Medicine as well as those 
leading to the degrees of Bachelor of Science, Master of Science, and Doctor of Phi- 
losophy. 

With the definite organization of the Medical School there have been added on the 
Quadrangles clinics and departments devoted to the clinical medical sciences, similarly 
related to the Ogden Graduate School of Science and with the same general character 
and purpose. The work of these departments leads to the degrees of Doctor of Medicine, 
Bachelor of Science, Master of Science, and Doctor of Philosophy. 

Candidates for the degree of Doctor of Medicine do the work of the first two years 
in the Graduate School of Medicine of the Ogden Graduate School of Science on the 
Quadrangles of the University. The work of the third and fourth years may be done 
either in the Graduate School on the Quadrangles or in Rush Medical College at 1758 
West Harrison Street. 

The requirements for the fifth year may be satisfied either by a year of advanced 
work in some branch of medical science acceptable to the Faculty of the Graduate 
School of Medicine, or by a year of successful interneship in an approved hospital. 

For information concerning the courses in physics, chemistry, botany, and other 
departments whose work is closely associated with Medicine and in which Medical 
Students may elect courses, see the Announcements of the Colleges and Graduate Schools 
of Arts, Literature, and Science. 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOLS 



L THE GRADUATE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE OF 
THE OGDEN GRADUATE SCHOOL 

OF SCIENCE 

OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

Robert Maynard Hutchins, President of the University. 

Frederic Woodward, Vice-President and Dean of Faculties. 

Franklin Chambers McLean, Director of Clinics and Assistant to the President in 

Medical Affairs. 
Henry Gordon Gale, Dean of the Ogden Graduate School of Science. 
Basil Coleman Hyatt Harvey, Dean of Medical Students. 
Walter A. Payne, University Recorder and Examiner. 
Edith Foster Flint, Chairman of the Women's University Council. 
Ralph Berger Seem, Director of Hospitals. 

OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

George William Bartelmez, Ph.D., Professor of Anatomy. 

Robert Russell Bensley, A.B., M.B., Sc.D., Professor of Anatomy. 

Frank Billings, Sc.D., M.D., Professor Emeritus of Medicine. 

Edward Vail Lapham Brown, S.B., M.D., Professor of Ophthalmology. 

Joseph A. Capps, A.M., M.D., Clinical Professor of Medicine. 

Anton Julius Carlson, Ph.D., M.D., LL.D., Professor of Physiology; Chairman of 

the Department of Physiology. 
Isidore Sydney Falk, Ph.D., Professor of Bacteriology. 
Basil Coleman Hyatt Harvey, A.B., M.D., Professor of Anatomy. 
Albert Baird Hastings, Ph.D., Professor of Biochemistry. 
Ludvig Hektoen, M.D., Sc.D., LL.D., Professor and Head of the Department of 

Pathology; Director of the John McCormiek Institute for Infectious Diseases. 
Charles Judson Herrick, Ph.D., Professor of Neurology. 
Paul Chesley Hodges, Ph.D., M.D., Professor of Roentgenology. 
Edwin Oakes Jordan, Ph.D., Sc.D., Professor of Bacteriology; Chairman of the 

Department of Hygiene and Bacteriology. 
Fred Conrad Koch, Ph.D., Professor of Physiological Chemistry; Chairman of the 

Department of Physiological Chemistry. 
Preston Kyes, A.M., M.D., Sc.D., Professor of Preventive Medicine. 
Frank Rattray Lillle, Ph.D., Sc.D., Professor of Embryology; Chairman of the 

Department of Zoology. 
Ralph Stayner Lillie, Ph.D., Professor of Physiology. 
Esmund Ray Long, Ph.D., M.D., Professor of Pathology. 
Arno Benedict Luckhardt, Ph.D., M.D., Professor of Physiology. 
Joseph Leggett Miller, M.D., Clinical Professor of Medicine. 
Franklin Chambers McLean, Ph.D., M.D., Professor of Medicine. 
Carl Richard Moore, Ph.D., Professor of Zoology. 
Dallas B. Phemister, M.D., Professor of Surgery; Chairman of the Department of 

Surgery. 



THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO 



Dudley Billings Reed, M.D., Professor of Hygiene; Director of the Health Service. 

Oswald Hope Robertson, S.M., M.D., Professor of Medicine. 

William Hay Taliaferro, Ph.D., Professor of Parasitology. 

Harry Gideon Wells, Ph.D., M.D., Professor and Chairman of the Department of 

Pathology; Director of the Otho S. A. Sprague Memorial Institute. 
Russell Morse Wilder, Ph.D., M.D., Professor and Chairman of the Department 

of Medicine. 

Herman Niels Bundesen, M.D., Professorial Lecturer in Public Health Administra- 
tion. 

Richard Jaffe, M.D., Professorial Lecturer on Pathology. 

Alton S. Pope, M.D., D.P.H., Professorial Lecturer in Epidemiology; Chief, Bureau of 
Communicable Diseases, Department of Health, Chicago. 



Edmund Andrews, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 
Perctval Bailey, Ph.D., M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 
Paul Roberts Cannon, Ph.D., M.D., Associate Professor of Pathology. 
George Morris Curtis, Ph.D., M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 
Lester Reynold Dragstedt, Ph.D., M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 
Milton Theodore Hanke, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Pathology (Sprague Insti- 
tute). 
Friedrich Hiller, M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 
Nathaniel Kleitman, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Physiology. 
Peter Clemens Kronfeld, M.D., Associate Professor of Ophthalmology. 
David Judson Lingle, Ph.D., Associate Professor Emeritus of Physiology. 
Maud Slye, A.B., Associate Professor of Pathology (Sprague Institute). 
Charles Henry Swift, Ph.D., M.D., Associate Professor of Anatomy. 
Harry Benjamin van Dyke, Ph.D., M.D., Associate Professor of Pharmacology. 



Emmet Blackburn Bay, S.B., M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine. 

Samuel William Becker, M.D., Assistant Professor of Dermatology. 

Robert Gustav Bloch, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 

William Bloom, A.B., M.D., Assistant Professor of Anatomy. 

Louis Bothman, S.B., M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology. 

Charles Stilwell Capp, A.M., M.D.. Assistant Professor of Roentgenology. 

William Ernest Cary, Ph.D., M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine. 

Ralph Waldo Gerard, Ph.D., M.D., Assistant Professor of Physiology. 

Junius Claibourne Gregory, M.D., Colonel, Medical Corps, F.A.M.C, Assistant 

Professor of Military Medicine. 
Roy Richard Grinker, S.B., M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine. 
Bela Halpert, M.D., Assistant Professor of Pathology. 

Martin Edward Hanke, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Physiological Chemistry. 
Harry Lee Huber, Ph.D., M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine. 
Charles Brenton Huggins, S.B., M.D., Assistant Professor of Surgery. 
Alfred E. Koehler, Ph.D., M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine 
Stewart Armend Koser, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Bacteriology. 
Louis Leiter, Ph.D., M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
Julian Herman Lewis, A.M., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Pathology (Sprague 

Institute). 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOLS 



John Ralston Lindsay, S.B., M.D., Assistant Professor of Otolaryngology. 
Siegfried Maurer, S.B., M.D., Assistant Professor of Pathology (Sprague Institute). 
Charles Philip Miller, Jr., S.M., M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
Marie Ortmayer, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine. 
Walter Lincoln Palmer, Ph.D., M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
William Robinson, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Pathology (Sprague Institute). 
Stewart B. Sniffen, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychiatry. 

S. V. Abraham, A.B., Instructor in Ophthalmology. 

Lotta Jean Bogert, Ph.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

Hilmeyer Cohen, Ph.D., Instructor in Pathology (Sprague Institute). 

Edward Lyon Compere, S.M., M.D., Clinical Instructor in Surgery. 

Willis Eugene Gouwens, Ph.D., M.D., Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 

Hallie Hartgraves, M.D., Instructor in Ophthalmology. 

Sylvia Gates Holton, A.B., Instructor in Anatomy. 

Normand Hoerr, Ph.D., Instructor in Anatomy. 

Dewey Katz, S.B., M.D., Instructor in Ophthalmology. 

Elizabeth Miller Koch, Ph.D., Research Instructor in Physiological Chemistry 

under the Douglas Smith Foundation. 
Margarete Meta Kunde, Ph.D., M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 
Alfred Larson, Ph.D., M.D., Instructor in Medicine, Resident Physician, Edward 

Sanitarium. 
Marion Smoot Needles, A.B., Instructor in Pathology (Sprague Institute). 
Eloise Parsons, Ph.D., M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 
Ida Kraus-Ragins, Ph.D., Instructor in Physiological Chemistry. 
Knute Axel Reuter, Ph.D., M.D., Instructor in Medicine, Resident Physician. 
Earl Bradford Ritchie, M.D., Instructor in Dermatology. 
John C. Rogers, A.B., Ph.D., Instructor in Preventive Medicine. 
Paul Armour Rosborough, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 
Felix Wadsworth Saunders, Ph.D., Instructor in Physiological Chemistry. 
Henry L. Schmitz, Ph.D., M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 
Gordon H. Scott, M.D., Instructor in Otolaryngology. 

Florence Barbara Seibert, Ph.D., Instructor in Pathology (Sprague Institute). 
Howard John Shaughnessy, Ph.D., Instructor in Hygiene. 

Mercy Aurora Southwick, M.D., Curator and Instructor in Pathological Technic. 
J. Murray Steele, Jr., M.D., Instructor in Medicine; Associate Resident Physician, 

Edward Sanitarium. 
William Brooks Steen, S.B., Instructor in Anatomy. 
Eugene Updyke Still, Ph.D., Instructor in Physiology. 
Emory Ross Strauser, Ph.D., Instructor in Anatomy. 
Adah Elizabeth Verder, Ph.D., Instructor in Bacteriology. 
Beatrice Lovett, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 
George E. Miller, Ph.D., M.D., Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 



Frances Coventry, Sc.D., Research Associate in Bacteriology on the Logan Fund. 

Lillian S. Eichelberger, Ph.D., Research x^ssociate in Medicine. 

Marie Agnes Hinrichs, Ph.D., Research Associate in Physiology. 

Harriett F. Holmes, A.B., Research Associate in Pathology (Sprague Institute). 

Edmund Jacobson, Ph.D., M.D., Research Associate in Physiology. 



THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO 



Bertha Kaplan, S.M., Research Associate in Medicine. 

Mary Eugenie Maver, Ph.D., Research Associate in Bacteriology under the Douglas 

Smith Foundation. 
Jeannette B. Obenchain, Ph.D., Research Associate in Anatomy. 
Lucy Graves Taliaferro, Sc.D., Research Associate in Parasitology. 

W. E. Adams, S.B., M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Caroline May Bensley, S.B., Research Assistant in Anatomy. 

Zachary A. Blier, S.B., Assistant in Physiology. 

Alexander Brunschwig., S.M., M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

P. C. Bucy, S.M., M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Earl S. Carey, Ph.D., M.D., Research Assistant in Medicine. 

James E. Davis, M.A., Research Assistant in Medicine. 

Chester Davis, S.B., Assistant in Physiological Chemistry. 

Clarence Kilgore Elliott, A.B., Assistant in Physiological Chemistry. 

J. C. Ellis, S.B., M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Edith Farrar, A.B., Assistant in Pathology. 

Milner Richard Freeland, S.B., Assistant in Physiological Chemistry. 

Lucille Ruth Grant, M.D., Clinical Assistant in Medicine. 

James B. Greaser, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

John Gregg Hand, A.B., Assistant in Pharmacology. 

Roland Wendell Harrison, S.M., Assistant in Bacteriology. 

Ruth Herrick, M.D., Assistant in Dermatology. 

Eleanor Mary Humphreys, A.B., Assistant in Pathology. 

Hilger Perry Jenkins, S.B., M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Victor E. Johnson, S.B., Assistant in Physiology. 

Livingstone Eli Josselyn, S.B., Assistant in Anatomy. 

Ruth Kern, S.B., Technical Assistant in Physiology. 

Kathryn Knowlton, S.M., Assistant in Physiological Chemistry. 

Carl Oswald Lathrop, Sc.M., A.M., Assistant in Bacteriology. 

Einar Leifson, S.B., Assistant in Bacteriology. 

Huberta M. Livingstone, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Robert E. Lyons, M.D., Assistant in Medicine; Assistant Resident. 

George Morris McClure, A.B., Assistant in Anatomy. 

Archibald Ross McIntyre, S.B., Assistant in Pharmacology. 

Margaret Day McIntyre, S.B., Technical Assistant in Physiology. 

T. W. Martin, M.D., Assistant in Medicine; Assistant Resident. 

Alfonso Fararo Massaro, M.D., Assistant in Roentgenology; Assistant Resident. 

Kathleen Muir, M.D., Research Assistant in Dermatology. 

William Westbrook Redfern, S.B., Sc.D., Research Assistant in Medicine. 

T. D. Rivers, M.D., Assistant in Medicine; Assistant Resident. 

A. O. Rewbridge, S.B., M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Hillyer Rudisill, M.D., Assistant in Roentgenology; Assistant Resident. 

Martin E. Rudolph, M.D., Assistant in Medicine; Assistant Resident. 

Richard Klatte Schmitt, A.B., Assistant in Pharmacology. 

Evan Shute, M.D., Assistant in Medicine; Assistant Resident. 

Arthur Stenn, M.D., Clinical Assistant in Medicine. 

S. A. Szurek, S.B., Assistant in Physiology. 

Harold Tannenholz, M.D., Assistant in Dermatology; Assistant Resident. 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOLS 



Edward Eugene Terrell, S.B., Research Assistant in Medicine. 

Arthur John Vorwald, S.B., Assistant in Pathology. 

T. E. Walsh, A.B., Assistant in Otolaryngology. 

Denis Raymond A. Wharton, B.S., Assistant in Bacteriology. 

Philip Shih-Chi Kao, S.B., Curator. 

Eleanor Blish, S.B., Laboratory Assistant in Medicine. 

Mary Agnes Corn well, A.B., Laboratory Assistant in Medicine. 

Helen Howard, Laboratory Assistant in Medicine. 

Evelyn White Stevens, S.M., Laboratory Assistant in Neurology. 

Helen Van Sant, Laboratory Assistant in Medicine. 

FELLOWS, 1929-30 

Lotta Jean Bogert, Ph.D., Lasker Fellow in Medicine. 

Versa Viola Cole, A.B., Fellow in Physiological Chemistry. 

Octavio Barbosa Coutosilva, M.D., Rockefeller Foundation Fellow in Physiology. 

Katherine Elizabeth Cox, A.B., Logan Fellow in Bacteriology. 

James E. Davis, M.A., Lasker Fellow in Medicine. 

Patrick Arthur Delaney, Ph.D., M.D., National Research Council Fellow in Pathol- 
ogy. 

Robert Barton Dienst, A.M., Fellow in Bacteriology. 

Lillian Eichelberger, Ph.D., Lasker Fellow in Medicine. 

Rose Z. Felsher, S.B., Fellow in Physiological Chemistry. 

Dorothy Fetter, S.B., John Jelke, Jr. Fellow in Physiology. 

Thomas Francis Gallagher, A.B., Sex Research Fellow in Physiological Chemistry. 

William J. Gallagher, M.D., Seymour Coman Fellow in Physiology. 

Norman Edwin Gibbons, A.M., Fellow in Bacteriology. 

Lucille Ruth Grant, M.D., Douglas Smith Fellow in Medicine. 

James B. Greaser, M.D., Douglas Smith Fellow in Medicine. 

George Frederick Harsh, A.B., Mead Johnson Fellow in Physiological Chemistry. 

Millicent Louise Hathaway, A.M., Fellow in Physiological Chemistry. 

John Theobald Hauch, S.B., Mead Johnson Fellow in Physiological Chemistry. 

Erwin Jungherr, Fellow in Bacteriology. 

Bertha Kaplan, M.S., Douglas Smith Fellow in Medicine. 

Aaron Baker Kendrick, A.B., Meat Packers' Institute Fellow in Physiological Chem- 
istry. 

Alfred E. Koheler, Ph.D., M.D., Lasker Fellow in Medicine. 

Margarete Meta Kunde, Ph.D., M.D., Douglas Smith Fellow in Medicine. 

Heinrich Necheles, Ph.D., M.D., Rockefeller Foundation Fellow in Physiology. 

Truman S. Potter, M.D., Seymour Coman Fellow in Anatomy. 

William Westbrook Redfern, S.B., Sc.D., Douglas Smith Fellow in Medicine. 

Leo Tolstoi-Samuels, A.B., Evaporated Milk Association Fellow in Physiological 
Chemistry. 

Henry Schmitz, Ph.D., M.D., Douglas Smith Fellow in Medicine. 

Everette I. Solomon, S.B., T. J. Williams Fellow in Physiology. 

Li Sribyatta, M.D., Rockefeller Foundation Fellow in Physiology. 

Edward E. Terrell, S.B., Douglas Smith Fellow in Medicine. 

Winston Harris Tucker, S.M., Lowenstein Fellow in Hygiene and Bacteriology. 

Zonja Wallen-Lawrence, S.B., Evaporated Milk Association Fellow in Physiological 
Chemistry. 



THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO 



II. RUSH MEDICAL COLLEGE 

Rush Medical College is devoted to the clinical medical sciences. This college is 
situated on the West Side of Chicago in connection with the Presbyterian Hospital, 
the medical service of which is supplied by the College Faculty. Among the courses 
offered are all those of the third and fourth years required for the degree of Doctor of 
Medicine as well as elective courses in all departments. 

HISTORY 

Rush Medical College was chartered by a special act of the legislature of the state 
of Illinois in February, 1837. It was founded by Daniel Brainerd, who was its first 
president. The first course of lectures was delivered in the second story of a frame 
building on Clark Street, near Randolph, in 1843. In 1844 a college building was erected 
at the corner of Dearborn Avenue and Indiana Street (now Grand Avenue). In 1867 
a larger building was erected on the site of the old one. This edifice was destroyed in 
the great fire of 1871 and for three years the College occupied a temporary amphitheater 
on the ground of the Cook County Hospital, then located at Arnold and Eighteenth 
streets. In 1875 a Clinical Building was erected at the corner of Wood and Harrison 
streets, and in 1893 a Laboratory Building was erected on the south side of Harrison 
Street, opposite the Clinical Building. The Senn Building, adjoining the Clinical 
Building on the east, was erected in 1903. In 1887 the College became the medical 
department of Lake Forest University, retaining, however, its automony. This rela- 
tion was dissolved by mutual consent in April, 1898, and in the same month affiliation 
with the University of Chicago was established. In 1883 the Presbyterian Hospital, 
adjoining the College, was established in affiliation with Rush Medical College. In 
1908 an affiliation was entered into with the Children's Memorial Hosp tal similar to 
that obtaining with the Presbyterian Hospital. This was transferred in 1919 to the 
University of Chicago. In 1911 a similar affiliation was entered into with the Home for 
Destitute Crippled Children, and in 1915 with the Country Home for Convalescent 
Children. 

In May, 1924, a new contract was executed between the corporation of Rush 
Medical College and the University of Chicago in accordance with which the affiliation 
of 1898 was superseded and the University took over the work of Rush Medical College 
as a department of the University. This contract went into effect June 16, 1924. The 
old Clinical Building was removed in 1924, and has been replaced by the Rawson Clinical 
Laboratory and the Norman Bridge Laboratories of Pathology. 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

Robert Maynard Hutchins, President of the University. 
Frederic Woodward, Vice-President and Dean of Faculties. 
Ernest Edward Irons, Dean of Rush Medical College. 
Walter A. Payne, University Recorder and Examiner. 
James H. Harper, Registrar of Rush Medical College. 
Catherine A. MacAuliff, Librarian of Rush Medical College. 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOLS 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

Peter Bassoe, M.D., Clinical Professor of Neurology. 

William Thomas Belfield, M.D., Professor Emeritus of Surgery (Genito-urinary). 

Arthur Dean Bevan, A.M., M.D., Clinical Professor and Chairman of the Depart- 
ment of Surgery. 

Frank Billings, Sc.D., M.D., Professor Emeritus of Medicine. 

Edward Vail L. Brown, M.D., Clinical Professor and Chairman of the Department of 
Ophthalmology. 

Ralph Crissman Brown, M.D., Clinical Professor of Medicine. 

Vernon Cyrenius David, M.D., Clinical Professor of Surgery. 

George Frederick Dick, M.D., Clinical Professor of Medicine. 

John Milton Dodson, A.M., M.D., Professor Emeritus of Medicine. 

Arthur R. Elliott, M.D., Clinical Professor of Medicine. 

James Cornelius Gill, M.D., Clinical Professor of Neurology. 

Clifford Grosselle Grulee, A.M., M.D., LL.D., Clinical Professor and Chairman 
of the Department of Pediatrics. 

George Washington Hall, A.M., M.D., Clinical Professor of Neurology. 

Noble Sproat Heaney, M.D., Clinical Professor and Chairman of the Department of 
Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

Ludvig Hektoen, M.D., Sc.D., LL.D., Professor of Pathology. 

Robert Harry Herbst, M.D., Clinical Professor of Surgery (Genito-urinary). 

James Bryan Herrick, A.M., M.D., Professor Emeritus of Medicine. 

Ernest Edward Irons, M.D., Ph.D., Clinical Professor of Medicine; Dean of Rush 
Medical College. 

Herman Louis Kretschmer, M.D., Clinical Professor of Surgery (Genito-urinary). 

Sydney Kuh, M.D., Clinical Professor of Neurology. 

Edwin Raymond LeCount, M.D., Professor and Chairman of the Department of 
Pathology. 

Oliver Samuel Ormsby, M.D., Clinical Professor and Chairman of the Department 
of Dermatology. 

Wilber E. Post, M.D., Clinical Professor of Medicine. 

Thor Rothstein, M.D., Clinical Professor of Neurology. 

George Elmer Shambaugh, Ph.B., M.D., Clinical Professor and Chairman of the 
Department of Laryngology and Otology. 

Samuel Robert Slaymaker, A.B., M.D., Clinical Professor of Medicine. 

Kellogg Speed, M.D., Clinical Professor of Surgery. 

Frederick Tice, M.D., Clinical Professor of Medicine. 

Theodore Tieken, Ph.D., M.D., Clinical Professor of Medicine. 

George Howitt Weaver, M.D., Professor of Pathology. 

John Clarence Webster, M.D., F.R.C.P., Sc.D., LL.D., Professor Emeritus of 
Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

Ralph Waldo Webster, M.D., Ph.D., Clinical Professor of Medicine (Medical Juris- 
prudence). 

William Hamlin Wilder, A.M., M.D., Professor Emeritus of Ophthalmology. 

Rollin Turner Woodyatt, S.B., M.D., Clinical Professor and Chairman of the De- 
partment of Medicine. 

Donald Putnam Abbott, M.D., Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine. 



10 THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO 

Thomas Dyer Allen, M.D., Associate Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology. 

Joseph Louis Baer, S.M., M.D., Associate Clinical Professor of Obstetrics and Gyne- 
cology. 

Carey Culbertson, M.D., Associate Clinical Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

Charles Gilchrist Darling, M.D., Associate Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology. 

Carl Braden Davis, S.B., M.D., Associate Clinical Professor of Surgery. 

John Bernard Ellis, M.D., Associate Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology. 

Bernard Fanttjs, S.M., M.D., Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine (Thera- 
peutics). 

John Favill, M.D., Associate Clinical Professor of Neurology. 

Earle B. Fowler, M.D., Associate Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology. 

Gatewood Gatewood, A.M., M.D., Associate Clinical Professor of Surgery. 

Lee Connel Gatewood, A.M., M.D., Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine. 

Isabella Coler Herb, M.D., Associate Clinical Professor of Surgery (Anaesthetics). 

Archibald Hoyne, M.D., Associate Clinical Professor of Pediatrics. 

Aaron Elias Kanter, S.M., M.D., Associate Clinical Professor of Obstetrics and 
Gynecology. 

Ernest Lewis McEwen, S.M., M.D., Associate Clinical Professor of Dermatology. 

Edwin Morton Miller, M.D., Associate Clinical Professor of Surgery. 

William Franklin Moncrief, M.D., Associate Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology. 

Albert Horr Montgomery, M.D., Associate Clinical Professor of Surgery. 

Frederick Brown Moorehead, D.D.S., M.D., Associate Clinical Professor of Surgery 
(Oral and Dental). 

Edward Allen Oliver, M.D., Associate Clinical Professor of Dermatology. 

Charles Aubrey Parker, M.D., Associate Clinical Professor of Surgery (Orthopedic). 

Arthur Hawley Parmelee, M.D., Associate Clinical Professor of Pediatrics. 

William George Reeder, M.D., Associate Professor of Ophthalmology. 

Cassie Belle Rose, M.D., Associate Clinical Professor of Surgery (Radiology). 

Solomon Strouse, M.D., Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine. 



Frank Wesley Allin, A.M., M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Pediatrics. 
Carl Wesley Apfelbach, M.D., Assistant Professor of Pathology. 
Loren William Avery, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Neurology. 
Elven James Berkheiser, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Surgery (Orthopedic). 
Leon Bloch, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine. 
Arthur F. Byfield, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine. 
Frank Amos Chapman, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine. 
George Howell Coleman, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine. 
George Gilbert Davis, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Surgery. 
Clark Wylie Finnerud, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Dermatology. 
Morris Fishbein, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine. 
Francis Leo For an, M.D., S.M., Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine. 
Frederick Olaf Fredrickson, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine. 
James Richard Greer, M.D., Ph.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine. 
Walter Wile Hamburger, S.M., M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine. 
Daniel Bernard Hayden, A.M., M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Laryngology 
and Otology. 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOLS 11 

Edwin Frederick Hirsch, Ph.D., M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Pathology. 

Harry Richard Hoffman, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Neurology. 

Harry Lee Huber, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine. 

Harry J. Isaacs, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine. 

Frank Brazzil Kelly, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine. 

Elmer Lawton Ken yon, A.B., M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Laryngology and 

Otology. 
Bertha Klein, M.D., Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology. 
Disraeli William Kobak, M.D., F.R.C.R. (London), Assistant Clinical Professor of 

Medicine (Physiotherapy). 
Grant Harrison Laing, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine. 
Yale Norman Levlnson, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine. 
Edward James Lewis, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Surgery. 
Thomas Williams Lewis, S.B., M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Laryngology and 

Otology. 
Ludwig Mannheimer Loeb, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine. 
Clarence James McMullen, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine. 
William Duncan McNally, A.B., M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine 

(Materia Medica). 
Golder Lewis McWhorter, M.D., Ph.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Surgery. 
James Herbert Mitchell, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Dermatology. 
Homer King Nicoll, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine. 
Harry Alvin Oberhelman, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Surgery. 
Paul Oliver, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Surgery. 

Hugh James Polkey, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Surgery (Genito-urinary). 
Carl 0. Rinder, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine. 
John Ritter, M.D., Assistant Professor Emeritus of Medicine. 
Kamil Schulhoe, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine. 
Howard Martin Sheaef, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine; Dane 

Billings Memorial Fellow in Medicine. 
LeRoy Hendrick Sloan, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine. 
George Oliver Solem, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine. 
Robert Sonnenschein, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Laryngology and Otol- 
ogy. 
Edward Julius Stieglitz, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine. 
Charles Klaus Stulik, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Pediatrics. 
David C. Straus, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Surgery. 
Francis Howe Straus, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Surgery. 
William Alexander Thomas, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine. 
George Abraham Torrison, A.B., M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Laryngology 

and Otology. ' 

Ralph W. Trimmer, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine. 
Roger Throop Vaughan, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Surgery. 
Robert Von der Heydt, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology. 
Emil George Vrtiak, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine. 
Josephine Estabrqok Young, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Neurology. 



Harry Eugene Kelly, A.M., Lecturer on Medicine (Medical Jurisprudence). 



12 THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO 

Joseph Allegretti, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 

Edward Dudley Allen, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

Stephen Pantelis Anthony, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 

Margaret Howard Austin, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 

Hillier L. Baker, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Surgery. 

Carl Philip Bauer, S.B., M.D., Clinical Instructor in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

Morris Braude, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Neurology. 

Edward Buckman, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Surgery (Genito-urinary). 

William L. Buhrman, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Pediatrics. 

Faris Franklin Chesley, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 

Arthur Ralph Colwell, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 

Thomas Cottrell, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Surgery (Genito-urinary). 

Gerritt Cotts, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

Herman Porter Davidson, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Ophthalmology. 

Michael Higglns Ebert, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Dermatology. 

James Bryan Eyerly, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 

James P. Fitzgerald, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Ophthalmology. 

Paul Christopher Fox, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

Richard Cotter Gamble, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Ophthalmology. 

Max Peter Gethner, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 

Victor E. Gonda, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Medicine (Neurology). 

Elmer William Hagens, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Laryngology and Otology. 

Harry G. Hardt, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Neurology. 

Ralph Lee Harris, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 

George Fielding Hibbert, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

William George Hlbbs, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 

George Henry Jackson, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Surgery. 

Fiske Jones, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

Merrill H. Killip, D.D.S., Clinical Instructor in Surgery (Oral). 

Alva A. Knight, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 

Ross Stanley Lang, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 

Vernon Mayne Leech, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Ophthalmology. 

Eleanor I. Leslie, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Pediatrics. 

Meyer R. Lichtenstein, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 

Will Ferson Lyon, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 

Mary M. Lyons, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Surgery (Anaesthetics). 

Mabel Marie Matthies, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 

Edwin McGinnis, A.B., M.D., Clinical Instructor in Laryngology and Otology. 

George E. Miller, Ph.D., M.D., Clinical Instructor in Medicine (Materia Medica 

and Toxicology). 
Howard C. Miller, D.D.S., Clinical Instructor in Surgery (Oral). 
Jacob Myers, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Surgery (Orthopedic). 
Evans W. Pernokis, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 
Richard B. Richter, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Medicine (Neurology). 
Abraham B. Rimmerman, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 
David B. Rotman, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Medicine (Neurology). 
George J. Rukstinat, S.B., M.D., Instructor in Pathology. 
Heyworth N. Sanford, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Pediatrics. 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOLS 13 

Ferdinand A. Seidler, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Surgery (Orthopedic). 

Asher F. Sd?py, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 

Arthur Churchill Strong, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Laryngology and Otology. 

Georgianna Dvorak Theobald, M.D., Instructor in Ophthalmology. 

Kay L. Thompson, D.D.S., Clinical Instructor in Surgery (Oral). 

Irving Treiger, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 

Thomas Gervase Walsh, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 

John Frank Waugh, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Dermatology. 

Earl Alfred Zaus, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 



Arthur J. Atkinson, M.D., Clinical Associate in Medicine. 

Charles Melville Bacon, M.D., Clinical Associate in Medicine. 

Fred Ball, M.D., Clinical Associate in Medicine. 

Knowlton E. Barber, M.D., Clinical Associate in Surgery (Genito-urinary). 

George Alvin Barnett, M.D., Clinical Associate in Pediatrics. 

Craig D. Butler, M.D., Clinical Associate in Medicine. 

Leo K. Campbell, M.D., Clinical Associate in Medicine. 

Eduard L. Chainski, M.D., Clinical Associate in Laryngology and Otology. 

Roy Herndon Cox, M.D., Clinical Associate in Surgery (Genito-urinary). 

Louis T. Curry, M.D., Clinical Associate in Laryngology and Otology. 

Ethel Mildred Davis, M.D., Clinical Associate in Medicine. 

Marion S. Fink, M.D., Clinical Associate in Dermatology. 

Alexander Garegin Gabrielianz, M.D., Clinical Associate in Obstetrics and Gyne- 
cology. 

William John Gallagher, M.D., Clinical Associate in Surgery. 

Jay McKinley Garner, M.D., Clinical Associate in Medicine. 

John Jacob Hesser, M.D., Clinical Associate in Medicine. 

Howard Jean Hollo way, S.B., M.D., Clinical Associate in Obstetrics and Gyne- 
cology. 

Jay Ireland, M.D., Clinical Associate in Surgery. 

Clayton J. Lundy, M.D., Clinical Associate in Medicine. 

Earl Roach McCarthy, M.D., Clinical Associate in Surgery. 

Arthur Sophus Juul Peterson, M.D., Clinical Associate in Medicine. 

Willis J. Potts, M.D., Clinical Associate in Surgery. 

Dean L. Rider, M.D., Clinical Associate in Surgery. 

Jesse H. Roth, M.D., Clinical Associate in Laryngology and Otology. 

Mary Gritzner Schroeder, M.D., Clinical Associate in Medicine (Neurology). 

Abraham M. Serby, M.D., Clinical Associate in Medicine. 

Maurice Simkin, M.D., Clinical Associate in Medicine. 

William Simkin, M.D., Clinical Associate in Medicine. 

Andrew Joseph Sullivan, M.D., Clinical Associate in Surgery (Genito-urinary). 

Frank V. Theis, M.D., Clinical Associate in Surgery. 

Eugene Fagan Traut, M.D., Clinical Associate in Medicine. 

Alfred L. Van Dellen, M.D., Clinical Associate in Ophthalmology. 

Howard Wakefield, M.D., Clinical Associate in Medicine. 

Richard W. Watkins, M.D., Clinical Associate in Laryngology and Otology. 

Anders J. Weigen, M.D., Clinical Associate in Medicine. 

Charles Graften Weller, M.D., Clinical Associate in Surgery (Genito-urinary). 



14 THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO 

James Lisle Williams, A.M., M.D., Clinical Associate in Medicine. 
Maude Hall Winnett, M.D., Clinical Associate in Medicine, 
William J. Yonker, M.D., Clinical Associate in Laryngology and Otology. 
John Joseph Zavertnik, M.D., Clinical Associate in Pediatrics. 



John Sherman Ashby, S.M., M.D., Clinical Assistant in Medicine. 

Jacob J. Baratz, M.D., Clinical Assistant in Medicine. 

Nora B. Brandenburg, M.D., Clinical Assistant in Surgery (Anaesthetist). 

Joseph H. Chivers, M.D., Clinical Assistant in Surgery. 

Leo Matthew Czaja, M.D., Clinical Assistant in Surgery. 

Arthur E. Diggs, M.D., Francis A. Hardy Fellow in Surgery; Assistant House Sur- 
geon, Presbyterian Hospital. 

Dorothy Edwards, S.B., M.D., Clinical Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

Esther Frankel, M.D., Clinical Assistant in Medicine (Physiotherapy). 

Harry Friedman, M.D., Clinical Assistant in Medicine. 

Harold Goldthorpe, Ph.D., Assistant in Pathology. 

Daniel T. Goudy, M.D., Research Fellow in Dermatology, Hyde Memorial Fund. 

Benjamin H. Hilkovitch, M.D., Clinical Assistant in Medicine. 

G. Howard Irwin, M.D., Clinical Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

Clyde Reynolds Jensen, M.D., Assistant in Pathology. . 

Jennie Kantor-Amtman, M.D., Clinical Assistant in Pediatrics. 

Stanley E. Lawton, M.D., Clinical Assistant in Surgery. 

Samuel A. Leader, M.D., Clinical Assistant in Medicine. 

Arnold L. Lleberman, M.D., Clinical Assistant in Medicine. 

Mark L. Loring, M.D., Thomson-Bevan Fellow in Surgery; Assistant House Surgeon, 
Presbyterian Hospital. 

Roland Parks Mackay, M.D., Clinical Assistant in Medicine (Neurology). 

John McDavid, M.D., Clinical Assistant in Pediatrics. 

Lawrence L. McLellan, M.D., Clinical Assistant in Medicine. 

Alice McNeal, M.D., Clinical Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology (Anaesthetist). 

Florence M. Meader-Rees, M.D., Clinical Assistant in Pediatrics. 

Vernon E. L. Mrazek, M.D., Clinical Assistant in Dermatology. 

Julius J. Mussil, M.D., Clinical Assistant in Surgery. 

Glenway W. Nethercut, M.D., Clinical Assistant in Ophthalmology. 

George F. O'Brien, M.D., Clinical Assistant in Medicine. 

Randolph Francis Olmsted, M.D., Clinical Assistant in Surgery. 

Charles N. Pease, M.D., Clinical Assistant in Surgery (Orthopedic). 

Chester A. Perrodin, M.D., Clinical Assistant in Surgery (Genito-urinary). 

Clarence W. Rainey, M.D., Clinical Assistant in Ophthalmology. 

William B. Raycrapt, M.D., Clinical Assistant in Pediatrics 

G. Bernice Rhodes, A.M., Assistant in Pathology. 

Yetta Scheftel, M.D., Clinical Assistant in Medicine (Neurology). 

Ellis Schweid, M.D., Clinical Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

Celestin B. Semerak, S.B., M.D., Assistant in Pathology. 

Charles A. Siler, M.D., Clinical Assistant in Medicine. 

Meyer J. Steinberg, M.D., Clinical Assistant in Medicine. 

Carl Thompson Stephan, M.D., Clinical Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

Joseph Taymor, M.D., Clinical Assistant in Medicine. 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOLS 15 

George C. Turner, M.D., Clinical Assistant in Medicine. 
Elmer A. Vorisek, M.D., Clinical Assistant in Ophthalmology. 
William John Vynalek, M.D., Clinical Assistant in Surgery (Genito-urinary). 
Norman T. Weleord, M.D., Clinical Assistant in Pediatrics. 
Leroy William Yolton, A.M., Fellow in Pathology. 

Ruben Nomland, M.D., Research Fellow in Dermatology (James Nevins Hyde Me- 
morial Fund). 

III. THE RUSH POST-GRADUATE SCHOOL 
OF MEDICINE 

The Rush Post-Graduate School of Medicine is devoted to investigation and 
advanced training in Clinical Medicine. Three lines of work are emphasized: investi- 
gation in special subjects by both students and staff; clinics and bedside studies in 
special fields of medical or surgical practice in conjunction with the laboratory studies 
pertaining to those fields for practitioners who wish to devote a year or more to prepara- 
tion for practice in a specialty or in general medicine; short terms of intensive clinics 
for practitioners who can devote less time, but who will thus be enabled to keep in- 
formed of important advances in medical practice. It is provided that the Faculty shall 
consist of: (a) the President of the University; (b) the Dean of Faculties; (c) the Dean 
of the School; (d) the Chairmen of Departments in the School; (e) those members of 
the Faculty of Rush Medical College substantially half of whose work for the current 
year is in the Rush Post-Graduate School of Medicine. This Faculty controls the work 
of the Rush Post-Graduate School of Medicine and recommends its students to the 
Graduate Faculties of the University for admission to candidacy for the Master's degree 
and the Doctor of Philosophy degree and for those degrees. Courses in otolaryngology, 
ophthalmology, dermatology, surgery, and radiology are now offered as outlined in a 
separate announcement. Other courses are being organized and will be offered in the 
Autumn Quarter, 1929. Correspondence is invited. 



16 THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO 

BOARDS 

BOARD OF MEDICAL AFFAIRS 

Members ex officio: 

The President. 

The Vice-President and Dean or Faculties. 

The Recorder. 

The Vice-Chairman of the Faculty oe the Graduate School of Medicine. 

The Dean of the Ogden Graduate School of Science. 

The Dean of Medical Students. 

The Dean of Rush Medical College. 

The Dean of the Rush Post-Graduate School of Medicine. 

The Director of University Hospitals. 

The Director of the Otho S. A. Sprague Memorial Institute. 

The Director of the John McCormick Institute for Infectious Diseases. 
Vernon C. David, representing the Presbyterian Hospital. 
Joseph Brennemann, representing the Children's Memorial Hospital. 
Oliver S. Ormsby, 4epresenting the Central Free Dispensary. 
Arthur D. Bevan, representing the Home for Destitute Crippled Children. 
Charles A. Parker, representing the Country Home for Convalescent Children. 
Members by appointment: 

Robert R. Bensley. 

E. V. L. Brown. 

Anton J. Carlson. 

Edwin O. Jordan. 

Dallas B. Phemister. 

George E. Shambaugh. 

Julius Stieglitz. 

Russell Morse Wilder. 

BOARD OF HOSPITALS 

Members ex officio: 

The President. 

The Vice-President and Dean of Faculties. 
The Recorder. 

The Vice-Ch airman of the Faculty of the Graduate School of Medicine. 
The Dean of the Ogden Graduate School of Science. 
The Dean of Medical Students. 
The Director of Hospitals. 

The Dean of the Graduate School of Social Service Administration. 
Members by appointment: 
Frank Billings 
Anton J. Carlson. 
Ludvig Hektoen. 
Ernest Edward Irons. 
Edwin O. Jordan. 
Joseph L. Miller. 
Dallas B. Phemister. 
Harry Gideon Wells. 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOLS 17 



GENERAL REGULATIONS 

1. Changes in rules and regulations. — The right is reserved by the University to 
make changes at any time in requirements for admission, curriculum, fees, or any rules 
and regulations, and to refuse further registration to a student whom his instructors be- 
lieve to be incompetent in scholarship or otherwise unfit to continue his course. 

2. Physical and medical examination. — Every medical student must report at the 
office of the Health Service for physical and medical examination during the third week 
of his first quarter in residence in the Medical School. Each student must show evidence 
of satisfactory vaccination against smallpox. The University seeks to maintain the best 
possible sanitary and hygienic conditions in the matter of (1) purity of water and 
food supply, (2) sanitary conditions of all buildings and rooms used in any way by 
students, (3) preventing the entrance and spread of contagious diseases, (4) restraining 
students from undertaking work for which they are physically unfit. The co-operation 
of all students is requested in carrying out this purpose. 

The Student Health Service of the University in co-operation with the University 
clinics provides for the physical examination of students and for the care of those who 
become ill. Charge is made only for special service or prolonged hospitalization. (See 
Health Service Bulletin.) 

3. The University year. — The University year is divided into four quarters of 
about twelve weeks each. The Autumn, Winter, and Spring Quarters begin about the 
first day of October, January, and April, respectively, and the Summer Quarter im- 
mediately after the close of the Spring Quarter. The Summer Quarter is divided into 
two equal terms. At the close of the Autumn and Winter Quarters there is a recess. 
At the close of the Spring Quarter there is no recess. At the close of the Summer 
Quarter there is a recess of about four weeks. Students are admitted at the opening of 
any quarter including the Summer Quarter, but medical students must commence 
the medical curriculum with the Autumn or Spring Quarters in order to pursue the 
initial medical courses in proper sequence. The work of the third year in Rush Medical 
College must commence also with the Autumn or Spring Quarter. 

4. Attendance of undergraduates. — It is expected that students will regard an 
engagement with an instructor or other University appointment as they regard any 
other engagement and that the customary rules of courtesy will be observed. 

ADMISSION 

1. Limitation of classes. — First- and second-year classes are limited to 100 in each 
class; the third- and fourth-year classes in Rush Medical College to 140 in each class. 

2. Admission. — It is recommended that students begin the medical work in either 
the Autumn or Spring Quarter. The Committee on Admissions meets regularly in May 
and February of each year to consider admission to the Graduate School of Medicine at 
the University and to Rush Medical College. Applications for admission in the Autumn 
Quarter should be submitted by May 15. The Committee selects from among the appli- 
cants students who can be admitted on a basis of scholarship and the possession of other 
qualifications judged necessary or desirable in the study and practice of medicine. 



18 THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

1. A Bachelor's degree, equivalent or approximately equivalent to that conferred 
by leading colleges and universities, is required for admission to the Graduate School 
of Medicine of the University of Chicago. The college work must have included the 
equivalent of 10 majors (33% semester hours) of work in the natural and physical 
sciences. The applicant must have a reading knowledge of one modern language other 
than English (German or French preferred) ; this knowledge is tested by an examination 
(largely scientific in character) given by the appropriate department two days before 
the work of the Spring or Autumn Quarters is started, or it may be taken during the year 
preceding admission. 

2. Evidence of interest and ability in research will commend applicants to the 
Committee on Admission. 

SUGGESTIONS REGARDING COLLEGE PREPARATION 
FOR MEDICINE 

Attention is called to the prerequisites for certain medical courses as stated in the 
departmental announcements, particularly to those for Physiological Chemistry 
(Quantitative Chemical Analysis and Organic Chemistry), Embryology (Comparative 
Anatomy of Vertebrates), Pathogenic Bacteriology (General Bacteriology), Physiology 
(a college course in Physiology with laboratory work). The courses in brackets should 
be elected in college if practicable, or they may be taken in Graduate Schools or after 
entering the Medical School. The study and practice of medipine is so wide a field that 
it offers opportunity for exercise of many different kinds of special interest and ability. 
No college training can fail to find possible usefulness. Some of the lines along which 
training may well be sought in college because of general value in medical study and 
work are : the use of the English language, Psychology, Physical Chemistry, Advanced 
Biology, Advanced Mathematics, History, Economics, Sociology, Latin, Greek, Draw- 
ing. 

The Council on Education of the American Medical Association has made some 
suggestions regarding individual subjects to be included in college work preparatory for 
medicine. These have been adopted by many state boards of medical licensure and re- 
quired. The state boards require only two years (or sixty semester hours) of college 
work, and students completing four years of college work will go far beyond these sug- 
gestions in some or all lines. 

a) Chemistry. — Twelve semester hours required of which at least eight semester hours 
must be in general inorganic chemistry, including four semester hours of laboratory work 
and four semester hours in organic chemistry, including two semester hours of laboratory 
work. In the interpretation of this rule, work in qualitative analysis may be counted as 
general inorganic chemistry. 

b) Physics. — Eight semester hours required, of which at least two must be laboratory 
work. It is urged that this course be preceded by a course in trigonometry. 

c) Biology. — Eight semester hours required, of which four must consist of laboratory 
work. This requirement may be satisfied by a course of eight semester hours in either general 
biology or zoology, or by courses of four semester hours each in zoology and botany, but not 
by botany alone. 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOLS 19 

d) English composition and literature. — The usual introductory college course of 
six semester hours, or its equivalent, is required. 

e) Non-science subjects. — Of the sixty semester hours required as the measurement 
of two years of college work, at least eighteen, including the six semester hours of English, 
should be in subjects other than the physical, chemical, or biologic sciences. 

f) Foreign Language. — A reading knoivledge of a modern foreign language is strongly 
urged. French and German have the closest bearing on modern medical literature. If the 
reading knowledge in one of these languages is obtained on the basis of high-school work, 
the student is urged to take the other language in his college course. It is not considered 
advisable, however, to spend more than twelve of the required sixty semester hours on foreign 
languages. 

Licensing boards of the various states require evidence of the completion of cer- 
tain preliminary education in advance of matriculation in a recognized medical school 
before candidates are admitted to examinations for license to practice. The require- 
ments in any particular state may be ascertained in the office of the Dean of Medical 
Students. 

In addition to the work outlined previously, students who so desire may study 
medical subjects in the fourth year of their college work if offered. The subjects which 
may ordinarily be so studied are Embryology, Histology, Dissection, Physiological 
Chemistry, Physiology. Credit in these subjects may be given for such work satis- 
factorily completed in an approved college. Such credit would not shorten the time 
required to be spent in the Medical School, but would permit taking more elective 
advanced medical courses. 

ADMISSION AS UNCLASSIFIED STUDENTS 

Students not seeking a degree may be admitted, through the office of the Univer- 
sity Examiner, as unclassified students on the following conditions : 

1) They shall present (a) credentials showing the completion of work equivalent 
to the admission requirements of the College or School in which they desire to register, 
or (b) evidence of the satisfactory completion of prerequisites for the courses desired. 

2) They shall give satisfactory reason for not classifying and becoming candidates 
for degrees. 

3) They enter the University for the purpose of making a study of a definite sub- 
ject or group of subjects for which adequate preparation has been received. In case of 
doubt as to the applicant's ability to pursue successfully the work desired, the approval 
of the instructor to whose courses admission is sought, or of an official representative 
of the department concerned, will be required. 

4) They may not register for elementary courses only. 

5) They are subject to the general regulations pertaining to other students. 

6) They are ineligible for public appearance. 

7) Registration of unclassified students in the medical courses is subject to the 
approval of the Dean of the School or College concerned. In the case of students coming 
from other medical schools, a statement from the Dean of good standing, a recommenda- 
tion from the Dean for registration in the courses desired here, and an official transcript 
showing the satisfactory completion of courses prerequisite to those desired here are 
required. 



20 THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO 

ADMISSION WITH ADVANCED STANDING IN THE 
MEDICAL COURSES 

Students from other medical schools may receive credit for work successfully com- 
pleted in such institutions, provided it is equivalent to corresponding work in the courses 
of the University of Chicago. They must have fulfilled the requirements for admission 
to the Medical Courses of this University. 

A student seeking admission with advanced standing should write to the University 
Examiner for the blank form of application, complete it and submit it, together with a 
letter of honorable dismissal from the college previously attended, to the Examiner, 
who will, if the conditions above stated are met, present it to the Committee on Admis- 
sion. The student will be promptly notified of the action taken. The Committee meets 
regularly in May and February of each year. Credit in undergraduate and graduate 
schools does not reduce the time required to be spent in the medical schools. 

PROCEDURE FOR ADMISSION 

Any student seeking admission to the Medical School is requested to write to the 
University Examiner for an application blank which should be rilled out fully and 
returned, together with an official itemized transcript of his college record, including a 
statement of his high-school record and a letter of honorable dismissal. The Examiner 
will evaluate these credentials, and will notify the student and the appropriate Dean 
promptly if the requirements for admission are fulfilled. If the requirements are not 
fulfilled the Examiner will send a list of deficiencies to the student. 

Students are not necessarily admitted even though their records meet the specific 
requirements. The Committee on Admission selects from among the applicants those 
who can be admitted on the basis of scholarship and the possession of other qualifica- 
tions judged necessary or desirable for the study and practice of medicine. 



REGISTRATION 

1. Registration includes (1) the selection of courses of study, (2) the filing of the 
registration card, and (3) the payment of fees to the University Cashier. Courses are 
selected and the registration card issued in the office of the Dean of the School or 
College. 

2. Advanced courses may not be taken before prerequisite courses have been com- 
pleted. With the approval of his Department, an instructor may make the completion 
of studies in related Departments a prerequisite for any course. 

3. The Cashier issues receipts for the payment of University bills and certifies 
payment upon the student's registration card. 

4. A student is not permitted to attend any course for which he is not registered. 

5. Change of registration, without charge, is permitted up to the end of the first 
week of a quarter, if the consent of the Dean is obtained. After the first week, a fee of 
one dollar is paid to the Cashier for each change of registration, unless the initiative 
for the change comes from a University officer. If the change involves additional tu- 
ition, this must be paid. 

6. Credit for more than 4 majors in one quarter requires special permission of the 
Faculties. 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOLS 21 

CONTINUANCE 

Continuance of students is subject to the recommendation of the Committee on 
Promotions. Students may be refused further registration in the medical courses if in the 
judgment of the Committee they are incompetent in scholarship or otherwise unfit to 
continue the course. 

DEFICIENCIES IN MEDICAL COURSES 

1. A student's work is deficient when either the quality or quantity of work done 
is unacceptable to the instructor. A qualitative deficiency is indicated by the grade 
reported. A quantitative deficiency is reported either as "incomplete" with indication 
of the deficiency or "lacks final examination." The instructor may, at his option, reduce 
the grade or the amount of credit because of inadequate work throughout the quarter or 
excessive absence from whatever cause. 

2. If a deficiency is not removed within the student's next quarter of residence, or, 
if the student is not meanwhile in residence within twelve months of the time it was 
incurred, the student must repeat the course to receive credit. A course lacking final 
examination may be completed, with the consent of the Dean and the instructor, by 
passing either (1) a special examination administered through the office of the Univer- 
sity Recorder or of the Dean of Rush Medical College, or (2) the regular class exami- 
nation at the end of the student's next quarter of residence, provided the course is again 
offered in that quarter. A course lacking work other than the final examination must 
be completed to the satisfaction of the instructor. 

DEGREES 

Graduate study in the Graduate School of Medicine of the Ogden Graduate 
School of Science may lead to the degree of Doctor of Medicine, of Master of Science, 
or of Doctor of Philosophy under the conditions specified below (for detailed statement 
as to candidacy and requirements see the Handbook of the Graduate Schools, supplied at 
the office of the Dean upon request). Graduate study in Rush Medical College leads to 
the degree of Doctor of Medicine. 

I. THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF MEDICINE 

This degree will be awarded on the recommendation of the Faculty of the Graduate 
School of Medicine of the Ogden Graduate School of Science or of the Faculty of Rush 
Medical College. 

1. GRADUATE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE OF THE OGDEN GRADUATE 
SCHOOL OF SCIENCE 

The candidate must be not less than twenty-one years of age and must be of good 
moral character. 

He must have been in attendance during twelve full quarters or an equivalent 
amount of time and must have completed satisfactorily 36 majors, or an equivalent 
amount of work, in a medical school approved by the University of Chicago. The work 
of at least three of the twelve quarters must have been done under this Faculty and the 
work of the last three must have been done in the University of Chicago. 

He must have satisfied the minimum departmental and departmental group re- 



22 THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO 

quirements as follows: 4 majors in Anatomy; 4 majors in Physiology, Physiological 
Chemistry and Pharmacology; 3 majors in Hygiene, Bacteriology, and Pathology; 6 
majors in Medicine (including Therapeutics, Pediatrics, Dermatology, and Neurology) ; 
5 majors in Surgery (including Orthopedics, Ophthalmology, and Otolaryngology) ; 2 
majors in Obstetrics and Gynecology. These requirements are stated in detail in the 
departmental statements. No individual course is specifically required for the M.D. 
degree. 

He must have satisfied the special requirements of at least one department, as 
follows: Work accepted by the department in excess of the minimum requirements as 
stated above, leading to the preparation of a thesis or dissertation acceptable to the 
department concerned and constituting an actual contribution to knowledge. With the 
approval of the Faculty of the Graduate School of Medicine any Department may ac- 
cept a Ph.D. thesis as fulfilment of the thesis requirement. 

He must have passed successfully final examinations in various groups of subjects, 
as follows: Anatomy and Embryology; Physiology, Physiological Chemistry and 
Pharmacology; Hygiene and Bacteriology, Pathology; Medicine; Surgery; Gynecology 
and Obstetrics. These examinations may be taken at any time when offered. The group 
examinations in the Anatomy and Physiology groups must be passed before beginning 
the second eighteen majors of work for the M.D. degree. Medical credit in all courses 
numbered 300 or higher is conditional upon passing the appropriate group examination. 

On completion of the foregoing requirements a four-year certificate will be issued 
qualifying the student for service as interne in a hospital. He must then have served 
a year of successful interneship in an approved hospital, or have completed a year of 
acceptable advanced work in some branch of medical science. 

See note on p. 26. 

2. RUSH MEDICAL COLLEGE 

The candidate must be not less than twenty-one years of age and must have 
studied medicine the legal period. He must have paid all dues, must have complied 
with all the requirements, and must have maintained unexceptionable conduct while in 
the University. 

He must have attended twelve full quarters, or an equivalent amount of time, in a 
recognized medical school, of which at least the last three quarters must have been taken 
in this institution, and fifty-two months must have elapsed between the beginning of his 
first session in a medical school and the date of his graduation. 

He must have completed successfully all of the work required, as follows : 18 majors 
of work in the Freshman and Sophomore years, comprising a minimum of 6| majors in 
Anatomy (from courses offered in the Department of Anatomy and the subdepartment 
of Embryology) ; these courses include both Gross and Microscopic Anatomy; 1 6 majors 
in Physiology (from courses offered in the Departments of Physiology and of Physiologi- 
cal Chemistry and Pharmacology) ; 2 majors in the Department of Pathology; If majors 
in the Department of Bacteriology; 2 majors in one or more of the departments of his 
choice. 

His work for the first two years must be pronounced satisfactory by the Com- 
mittee on Promotions, when a certificate of the completion of the first 18 majors of 
medical work will be issued to him. 

Twenty-two majors of work in the Junior and Senior years, comprising a minimum 
of 1 major in Pathology, 7 majors in Medicine (including Materia Medica, Thera- 

i They must include the dissection of the lateral half of the human body. 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOLS 23 

peutics, and Medical Jurisprudence), 1 major in Pediatrics, 5 majors in Surgery; 3 
majors in Obstetrics and Gynecology, 1 at least 2 majors of which must be in Obstetrics; 
1.2 majors in Laryngology and Otology; .8 major in Ophthalmology; 1 major in Derma- 
tology; 2 additional majors in any branch or branches of his choice. These requirements 
are presented in detail in the departmental statements. 

He must have passed successfully a final examination, both written and practical, 
in Pathology; Materia Medica, Therapeutics, Medicine; Pediatrics; Surgery; Obstetrics 
and Gynecology; Laryngology and Otology; Ophthalmology; and Dermatology. 

On the successful completion of four years of work, and of the final examinations, 
a four-year certificate is issued which qualifies the student to serve as an interne in a 
hospital. 

He must serve a year of successful interneship in an approved hospital. 

He must attend the graduation exercises and receive his diploma in person, unless 
excused for cause by special action of the Faculty. 



MEDICAL COURSES FOR THE FIRST AND SECOND YEARS AS REQUIRED 
BY THE FACULTY OF RUSH MEDICAL COLLEGE 

1. Outline of the courses. — The work of the first two years in Medicine consists 
mainly of study of the fundamental medical sciences: Human Anatomy, including 
Gross Anatomy, Histology, Neurology, and Embryology; Physiology, Physiological 
Chemistry , Pharmacology, Bacteriology, and Pathology. 

2. Amount of work. — The minimum amount of work is 18 majors. 

Note. — A major course in laboratory work is defined as a course occupying 10 hours a week for the 
quarter (a total of 120 hours). A major is in general equivalent to 3| semester hours. A double major oc- 
cupies twice the number of hours per week for the quarter. 

A minor course in laboratory work is a course occupying 10 hours a week for one-half a quarter, of 
six weeks. The value of each course in the following departmental statement is stated as a major (Mj.), a 
double major (DMj.), a minor (M.), a double minor (DM.), or the decimal fraction of a major or minor. 

3. The curriculum. — Satisfactory completion of the work outlined below is pre- 
requisite for admission to the clinical work of the third year in Rush Medical College. 

a) Anatomy, 6| majors as follows: Human Anatomy (Dissection), 3| majors 
(Anatomy 201, 202, 303, 304); Splanchnology, Histology, and Cytology, 1 major 
(Anatomy 211); Embryology, 1 major (Zoology 220); Neurology, 1 major (Anatomy 
317). 

b) Physiology | 6 majors as follows: Physiology, 3 majors (Physiology 251, 

c) Physiological I 252, 303); Physiological Chemistry, 2 majors (Physiological 
Chemistry and f Chemistry 201 and 302) ; Pharmacology, 1 major (Physiological 
Pharmacology J Chemistry 351). 

d) Pathology, 2 majors as follows: Pathology 301 and 302. 

e) Hygiene and Bacteriology, 1| majors including: Bacteriology 202. 

/) At least 2 additional elective majors in preclinical subjects. Advanced work in 
any related scientific departments of the University (Physics, Chemistry, Zoology, 
Botany, Psychology, Geology, etc.) may be counted as medical electives if approved 
by the Dean of Medical Students. Attention is called to the list of courses in each 
department and to the conditions under which the degrees of Master of Science or 
Doctor of Philosophy are awarded for work in these departments. 

An elective courses in Military Medicine is offered by a medical officer detailed by 
the Surgeon General of the Army. This course gives \ major of credit a year. 

1 Each student must have personally attended not less than twelve patients in confinement. 



24 THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO 

MEDICAL COURSES FOR THE THIRD AND FOURTH YEARS AS REQUIRED 
BY THE FACULTY OF RUSH MEDICAL COLLEGE 

1. Outline of courses. — The work of the third and fourth years consists mainly of 
study of the clinical medical sciences: Pathology, Medicine (including Materia Medica, 
Therapeutics, and Medical Jurisprudence), Pediatrics, Surgery, Obstetrics and Gyne- 
cology, Laryngology and Otology, Ophthalmology and Dermatology. 

2. Amount of work. — The amount of work required is 22 majors of which 2 majors 
are entirely elective. The remaining 20 majors are assigned to specific departments. 
There is an increasing freedom of election within departments. 

Optional courses in addition to those required above are offered to students who 
desire them. Students are encouraged to spend additional time in special work involving 
original investigation. 

THE FIFTH OR INTERNE YEAR, AS REQUIRED BY THE 
FACULTY OF RUSH MEDICAL COLLEGE 

Information, Rules, and Regulations 

GENERAL 

1. Since 1914 a fifth year has been required for graduation, consisting of an in- 
terneship in a hospital approved by the Faculty of Rush Medical College, and taken 
under conditions prescribed by that Faculty. 

2. On successful completion of the first four years including the usual final exami- 
nations the student receives a certificate, which qualifies him to enter upon the work 
of the fifth year. On completing successfully the fifth year he will be entitled, on recom- 
mendation of the Faculty, to the diploma conferring upon him the degree of Doctor in 
Medicine. 

3. Every student must secure an interneship by examination or appointment and 
must notify the Dean within two weeks after entering the hospital on special blank 
supplied for this purpose. The list of Approved Hospitals is divided into two groups — 
students desiring to apply for interneships in hospitals on the "B" list must consult the 
Dean before making application; arrangements for interneships in hospitals on the "A" 
list can be made without consultation. If the hospital is not on either of these lists the 
student should submit to the Dean a request for action by the Committee on Fifth Year 
as to whether or not that hospital will be approved. 

4. Upon receipt of notification from the student that the latter has selected a 
hospital, in which he will serve his required interneship, the Dean of the College shall 
communicate immediately by letter with the superintendent of said hospital, which 
communication shall cover the following points: (a) that prospective interne is a candi- 
date for the degree of Doctor in Medicine from the University of Chicago; (b) that as 
such he is accountable to the Faculty of Rush Medical College for the proper fulfilment 
of his fifth-year work; (c) that the College desires at all times that a mutual spirit of 
co-operation shall obtain between the college and the hospital. 

5. All internes during their service shall be under the' supervision of the Com- 
mittee on Fifth Year, aided by such members of the Faculty as the Committee may 
select to act as "supervisors." 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOLS 25 

INTERNES 

6. Each interne shall be assigned to a supervisor and shall be required, wheresoever 
he may be taking his interneship, to report to his supervisor as set forth herewith 
(a) Immediately upon receiving notification from the Committee on Fifth Year of his 
assignment to a supervisor he shall communicate with the latter in writing, giving the 
date of the beginning of his interneship, the service entered upon, the name of the 
hospital superintendent, and the names of his first attending men. He shall also see 
that the name of his supervisor is given to the hospital superintendent and to these 
attending men, and subsequently to other attending men as he shall come into relation- 
ships with them, (b) Thereafter the interne shall report in writing to his supervisor 
every two months. These bi-monthly reports shall include a reasonably detailed account 
of his hospital work to date, and the names of any new attending men under whom he 
may have come by change of services. 

7. If, at any time during the hospital service, the interne is confronted with a prob- 
lem which might affect his fifth-year standing and upon which he feels the need of advice 
and counsel, he shall communicate with his supervisor, who will give the matter immedi- 
ate consideration and if necessary will bring it at once to the attention of the Committee 
on Fifth Year. 

8. An interne will be expected to conform to the rules for the conduct of internes 
prescribed by the hospital in which he is serving. 

9. The attention of the internes is called to the clause in the Announcements 
under "Requirement for Graduation," which states that the candidate for a degree 
must have maintained unexceptionable conduct while at the University. This is and will 
be construed to include all fifth-year internes wheresoever they may be taking their 
fifth-year work. 

10. An interne abandoning, without the consent of the hospital authorities, an 
interneship which he has accepted, shall be denied his degree unless he satisfies the Fac- 
ulty that there were valid and ample reasons for his leaving said interneship. No interne 
may transfer his service to another hospital until he has received the consent of the 
Committee on Fifth Year in writing. In order to enforce this rule the College withholds 
the actual diploma of a student who may have completed a year of interneship in two 
hospitals until he has completed a full year of service for which he has contracted in 
the second hospital. 

11. A student may, at the discretion of the Committee on Fifth Year, be required 
to pass an examination at the end of his term of service as interne. 

12. The student shall be required to be present at the Convocation when his degree 
is to be conferred unless the Faculty grants his request that the degree be conferred 
in absentia. 

13. A copy of these regulations will be given each student entering the fifth-year 
work, which copy he shall keep for future reference. 

SUPERVISORS 

14. The Committee on Fifth Year, appointed by the Faculty, shall have charge 
of the supervision of the work of the fifth-year internes, shall determine the quality of 
that work, and shall judge whether the interne is entitled to be recommended to the 
University for the degree of Doctor in Medicine at the end of his service. 

15. The Committee on Fifth Year shall appoint "supervisors" from the Faculty, 
and, when deemed advisable, from the attending staff of the hospital in which the 
interne is serving. 



26 THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO 

16. One or more internes shall be assigned to each supervisor, who shall be notified 
at once of such assignment or assignments by the secretary of the Committee on Fifth 
Year. The supervisor should, if possible, have a personal interview with the students 
assigned to him. before they enter upon their interne service. 

17. Where possible the supervisor shall visit, for purposes of supervision and 
inspection, the hospital or hospitals where the internes under him are serving. 

18. The supervisor shall require each interne under him to carry out the provisions 
relative to reports in paragraph 6 above, and shall communicate with and secure re- 
ports from hospital superintendents and attending men as to the quality of work done 
by the interne, using the blanks provided for that purpose. 

19. He shall make quarterly individual reports on the work of the internes under 
him to the Committee on Fifth Year on blanks provided for that purpose, and shall 
make such comments and recommendations based on the reports received by him as 
will aid the Committee in each instance to act intelligently and justly in recommending 
to the University whether a degree is to be granted, an examination required, or a degree 
deferred or denied. 

20. The supervisor will be expected also to serve the internes under him in the 
capacity of counselor and helper. He shall give careful attention to and promptly 
answer all communications from internes requesting advice; and, if in doubt as to the 
course of action to recommend, shall place the matter at once before the Committee on 
Fifth Year through the Secretary of that body. 

21. The supervisor shall keep all correspondence, reports, etc., relative to each 
interne on file; shall be ready at any time on request to turn the same over to the 
Committee on Fifth Year, and at the end of the interne's year shall deliver intact to the 
Committee all such correspondence, reports, etc., that may remain in his hands. 

22. A copy of these regulations shall be sent each supervisor with his first notifica- 
tion of interne assignment, which copy he should file for future reference. 

23. The list of "Approved Hospitals" is made up of those which meet the require- 
ments laid down by the Faculty as to size, equipment, services, staff, etc., and which 
in their judgment offer an adequate interneship for fifth-year students. This list is 
subject to additions and changes at any time. 

24. The list of "Approved Hospitals" corrected to date will be found posted in 
the office of the Dean. 

Communications relative to the fifth year are to be referred to the secretary of the 

Committee on Fifth Year, Rush Medical College, 1758 West Harrison Street, Chicago. 

Note. — Admission to State Board Examinations for license to practice medicine is contingent in 
some states on the satisfactory completion of certain courses in the Medical School. Specific information 
concerning the requirements in any state may be obtained in the office of the Dean of Medical Students, 
or by writing the American Medical Association, 535 N. Dearborn Street, Chicago, for "Abstract of Laws 
and Board Rulings" (price sixty cents). The Illinois law governing license to practice in this state requires 
evidence that the minimum time between the commencement of the work of the Freshman year and the 
ending of the work of the Senior year, on which all students are required to be in attendance, shall be not 
less than forty months, and evidence of attendance on four full courses of lectures of at least nine months in 
four separate years. The Illinois law requires further that all applicants who graduated since July, 1923, 
must also have completed a course of training of not less than twelve months in a hospital approved by the 
Department of Registration and Education. 

IL THE MASTER'S DEGREE 1 

Two degrees are conferred, viz., Master of Arts and Master of Science. 

1. Candidacy. — Any member of any Graduate School who has been in attendance 

one quarter or more, whose undergraduate course is equivalent to that required for a 

1 In order to avoid misunderstandings, candidates for higher degrees should consult their Deans con- 
cerning all technical requirements for such degrees, including foreign-language requirements, before appli- 
cation is made for admission to candidacy. In all cases candidates should consult early with the chairman 
of the department of their specialization. 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOLS 27 

corresponding Bachelor's degree in the University of Chicago, 1 and whose dissertation 
subject has been approved by the department of specialization, may, on recommenda- 
tion by the Department, be admitted to candidacy for a Master's degree. Admission 
is by vote of the Graduate Faculty. Application for admission to candidacy must be 
made on the blank provided for the purpose. This blank may be obtained by the appli- 
cant at the Dean's Office, and the application must be on file in that office at least two 
months before the degree is conferred. 

2. Requirements. — Students thus accepted as candidates will be given a Master's 
degree on fulfilment of the following requirements: 

a) At least three quarters' residence at the University subsequent to a Bachelor's 
degree equivalent to that of the University of Chicago. A candidate for the Master's 
degree is not credited with "residence" if he enters a course scheduled for a quarter 
later than the seventh day of graduate instruction in the quarter, or a course scheduled 
for a term later than the fifth day of graduate instruction in that term. Withdrawals 
from courses a corresponding length of time before the close of the quarter or term have 
the same effect. 

b) At least eight majors of satisfactory graduate work taken in residence at the 
University of Chicago, of which not more than the equivalent of three majors may be 
taken as minor (| major) courses. These eight majors need not be all in one department, 
but are selected from courses taken in residence at the University of Chicago according 
to some rational plan approved by the Head (or Chairman) of the Department and by 
the Dean at least six months before the degree is conferred. 

At the discretion of the Department concerned, and corresponding registration in 
advance with the Deans, wide reading or other special work carried out by the student 
under the supervision of the Department and subject to such tests as the Department 
may prescribe, may be accepted as one or more majors of the required work. 

c) A satisfactory dissertation on a subject approved by the Head (or Chairman) 
of the Department at least three months (earlier at the option of the Department) be- 
fore graduation. 

d) The delivery of three printed or typewritten copies of the dissertation, together 
with a certificate signed by the Head (or Chairman) of the Department, that the work, 
as submitted, is accepted as the candidate's dissertation for the Master's degree, to the 
University Library at least two weeks before the Convocation at which the degree is 
to be conferred. 

e) A satisfactory examination on the work taken for the degree. 

/) Additional qualitative and specific requirements for the degree may be pre- 
scribed by any Department or Faculty. 

ILL THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

The Degree of Doctor of Philosophy is given in recognition of high attainments and 
ability in the candidate's chosen field, shown, first, by a dissertation evincing power of 
independent investigation and forming an actual contribution to existing knowledge; 
and, secondly, by passing an examination covering the general field of the candidate's 
subject. It is to be explicitly understood that this degree is not conferred on the com- 
pletion of a specific number of courses, or after a given period of residence. 

* Attention is particularly called to the fact that the term "equivalent" in this connection refers to 
quantity only. It does not affect the question of the specific Master's degree (Arts or Science) to which a 
given student's work would lead. In case the candidate did not obtain his Bachelor's degree at the Univer- 
sity of Chicago, he will present to the Examiner, on blanks furnished for the purpose, a detailed statement 
of his undergraduate work. The Examiner cannot always report upon these statements during the opening 
week of the quarter. 



28 THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO 

A. Candidacy. — Any student in a Graduate School of the University who has been 
in attendance one quarter or more (one month, in the case of a student entering with 
two years of residence graduate credit from another institution) whose thesis subject has 
been accepted by the Head (or Chairman) of the Department, and who has a reading 
knowledge of French and German, may, on recommendation of the Department, be 
enrolled by vote of the Graduate Faculty as a candidate for the degree of Doctor of 
Philosophy. On recommendation of a Department, approved by the Dean, any other 
Germanic language may be substituted for German and any other Romance language 
for French. A reading knowledge of the foreign languages must be certified by the 
appropriate Departments and the application for admission to candidacy must be filed 
by the applicant at the Dean's office on the blank provided for that purpose not less 
than eight calendar months before the convocation at which the degree is conferred. 
Responsibility for admission at the proper time rests with the student. 

B. Requirements. — 

a) Normally three years of residence work in pursuance of an accepted course of 
study, at least one year (3 quarters) of which shall be in residence at the University of 
Chicago. A candidate for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy is not credited with 
"residence" if he enters a course scheduled for a quarter later than the seventh day of 
graduate instruction in the quarter, or a course for a term later than the fifth day of 
graduate instruction in that term. Withdrawals from courses a corresponding length of 
time before the close of the quarter or term have the same effect. 

b) The work offered in fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of 
Philosophy in any Department is outlined by that Department and approved by the 
Dean, for each candidate, not later than the first quarter of his last year of residence 
work. The work required includes such courses in allied departments as may be deemed 
necessary by the department of specialization. The work is selected with regard to the 
needs of the individual student, with the double purpose (1) of giving him a knowledge 
of the relations of his subject to cognate branches of learning, and (2) of preparing him 
for productive scholarship. 

c) The presentation of a satisfactory dissertation upon a subject which has been 
approved by the Head (or Chairman) of the Department. 

d) A satisfactory final oral examination on the subject presented for the degree. 

C. Dissertation. — 

a) Each candidate prepares a dissertation upon some topic connected with the 
subject of his specialization. This production constitutes an actual contribution to 
knowledge. Its subject is submitted for approval to the Head (or Chairman) of the 
Department concerned at least twelve months before the date of the final examination. 

b) The dissertation is submitted to the Department in typewritten form at least 
one month before the date of the final examination, unless otherwise recommended by 
the Department. 

c) Three weeks before the Convocation at which the degree is to be conferred, three 
printed or typewritten copies of the dissertation, together with a certificate signed by 
the Head (or Chairman) of the Department that the work, as submitted, is accepted as 
the candidate's dissertation for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy and approved for 
publication without alteration, are delivered at the Dissertation Desk in the Acquisition 
Department of the University Libraries, Room W21, Harper Memorial Library. 

For details concerning the publication and distribution of dissertations, the can- 
didate is referred to the Handbook of the Graduate Schools, obtainable in the office. 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOLS 29 

D. Final examination. — After admission to candidacy the student may present 
himself for the final oral examination as soon as he has fulfilled the other general and 
departmental requirements. The candidate prepares a typewritten or printed brief of 
his work, including an analysis of the dissertation, and files six copies of the same with 
his Dean one week before the time for the examination. 

The examination for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy shall be taken at least ten 
days before the Convocation at which the degree is to be conferred. 

E. Non-resident work. — After being admitted, the student may be allowed to sub- 
stitute non-resident work for resident work to a limited extent, under conditions to be 
arranged in consultation with the Dean and the heads of the departments concerned. 

F. Work done in other universities. — Graduate work done in another university will 
be accepted as equivalent to resident work in the University of Chicago, provided the 
institution in which the work was done is of high standing, and adequate evidence is 
furnished that the work done there was satisfactorily performed. Graduate work done 
in other institutions, and credit allowed for non-resident work, cannot reduce the resi- 
dence requirement at the University of Chicago to a period of less than one year. 1 

GENERAL INFORMATION FOR STUDENTS ENTERING THE 

THIRD- AND FOURTH-YEAR CLASSES AT 

RUSH MEDICAL COLLEGE 

Attendance. — In order to be credited properly with attendance on any given term 
or course, it is imperative that students be present at the opening of each quarter. 
After the second day of any quarter no student can register except by special consent of the 
Dean and the payment of $5.00 late registration fee. The state boards of medical licensure 
require that the student must be in attendance during 80 per cent of the scheduled hours 
in any course for which he is registered in order to receive credit for the course. 

Matriculation. — Each student matriculates on entering the University for the first 
time, but not for subsequent quarters. The matriculation fee of the University is 
$10.00. The University Cashier has a representative at Rush Medical College. 

Registration. — Each student registers before or at the beginning of each quarter 
by filing a registration card. 

In case of early registration this card is retained at the Registrar's office and must 
be reclaimed by the student in person on the first or second day of the quarter. If not re- 
claimed at the time,Jhe student's registration for the quarter will be canceled, and can be 
restored only by the consent of the Dean and the payment of $5.00 late registration fee. 

The Dean will issue a card certifying admission to the proper class and will advise 
respecting the courses of study to be taken. 

THE YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 
The headquarters of the West Side Young Men's Christian Association are situated 
within a short distance of the College buildings. Membership in the Association, with 
the privilege of gymnasium, bathrooms, lecture courses, etc., may be obtained by appli- 
cation. 

_ J In order to avoid misunderstandings, candidates for higher degrees should consult their Deans con- 
cerning all technical requirements for such degrees before application is made for admission to candidacy, 
fn all case? candidates should consult early with the heads of the departments of their major and minor 
subjects. 



30 THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO 

THE DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY 

OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

Frank Rattray Lillie, Chairman of the Department of Zoology. 
Warder Clyde Allee, Secretary of the Department. 



Frank Rattray Lillie, Ph.D., Sc.D., Professor of Embryology. 

Charles Manning Child, Ph.D., Sc.D., Professor of Zoology. 

Horatio Hackett Newman, Ph.D., Professor of Zoology. 

Warder Clyde Allee, Ph.D., Professor of Zoology. 

Carl Richard Moore, Ph.D., Professor of Zoology. 

Sewall Wright, Sc.D., Professor of Zoology. 

Benjamin Harrison Willier, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Zoology. 

Libbie Henrietta Hyman, Ph.D., Research Associate in Zoology. 

Mary Juhn, Ph.D., Research Associate in Zoology. 

Lincoln V. Domm, Ph.D., Research Associate in Zoology. 

Herlue Strandskov, S.M., Assistant in Zoology. 

Everett Duane Sayles, S.M., Assistant in Zoology. 

Edith S. Boven, S.M., Assistant in Zoology. 

William A. Dreyer, A.B., Assistant in Zoology. 

Jesse F. Schuett, S.M., Assistant in Zoology. 

Ralph Buchsbaum, S.B., Assistant in Zoology. 



Alfred E. Emerson, Associate Professor of Zoology, University of Pittsburgh (Sum- 
mer, 1929). 

Thomas E. Snyder, Specialist in Forest Entomology, United States Department of 
Agriculture (Spring, 1929). 

FELLOWS, 1929-30 
Frances Church, S.M. Joseph Paul Eldred Morrison, S.B. 

Warren Norwood Keck, S.M. Dorothea Rudnick, Ph.B. 

Joel Carl Welty, A.M. 

INTRODUCTORY 

The courses in Zoology are intended to meet the needs of those students who desire 
to obtain some knowledge of Zoology as part of their general education, those who need 
work in Zoology to satisfy the requirements of other departments, and those who pro : 
pose to specialize in Zoology. The leading purpose of the courses is to present the 
subject-matter of the science, its guiding ideas, its principal subdivisions, its scope, 
methods, and history, and its relations to other sciences. 

It is advisable that students who propose to specialize in Zoology should obtain a 
broad scientific foundation, including work in the cognate sciences, and a reading knowl- 
edge of French and German. More specifically, students specializing in Zoology should 
take 4 or 5 majors in Chemistry, 2 or 3 in Physics, and 1 or 2 in Geology; they should also 
obtain knowledge of the general principles of microscopical Anatomy, Paleontology, Bot- 
any, and Physiology. These courses may be taken concurrently with the work in Zoology. 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOLS 31 

THE BACHELOR'S DEGREE 

Course 103 is a basic course prerequisite to all courses in Zoology except 105, and 
should be taken in the Junior Colleges. If a student presents credit for a full year of 
Zoology taken in third or fourth year of high school, he may begin with course 201 or 
207 with the consent of the Departmental Counselor. 

On admission to the Senior Colleges, each student specializing in the Department 
will arrange, in consultation with the Departmental Counselor, a program of approxi- 
mately 12 additional majors to be taken in the Department, or in the Department and 
related departments, including the following fundamental courses: Zoology 105, 201, 
202, 205, and 207. With the consent of the Departmental Counselor, certain courses in 
related fields may be used to complete the sequence in Zoology. 

HIGHER DEGREES 
Students proposing to be candidates for the Master of Science or the Doctor of 
Philosophy degrees in Zoology must have passed the requirements for the Bachelor of 
Science degree in this Department. For a detailed statement concerning University 
requirements for higher degrees, see the Handbook of the Graduate Schools. 

THE MASTER OF SCIENCE DEGREE 

Departmental prerequisites. — Nine additional majors in Zoology including a satis- 
factory thesis. 

THE DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY DEGREE 

Departmental prerequisites. — (1) An examination on the fundamentals of Zoology 
before admission to candidacy; (2) 3 or 4 formal courses and 3 majors or more of seminar 
courses in the Department, depending on previous preparation. 

The principal emphasis is placed on research, in connection with which all require- 
ments necessary for a scholarly piece of work will be demanded. 

THE ZOOLOGY CLUB 

The members of the staff and the advanced students of the Department form a club 
which meets weekly for the presentation of the research work of members of the Depart- 
ment and for review and discussion of important new literature. The meetings are open 
to all students in the Department. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Zoology 103 or its equivalent is prerequisite for all the Senior College courses in 
the Department. But courses 105 or 207 may be accepted as its equivalent for advanced 
work in the Department at the option of the instructor offering advanced courses. 

103. General Zoology. — Lectures and laboratory work constituting an introduc- 
tion to the general principles and concepts of Zoology. Mj. Summer, Emerson; Mj. 
Autumn, Wright and Assistants; Winter, and Assistants. 

105. Evolution, Genetics, and Eugenics. — An elementary course dealing with the 
history and principles of evolution and genetics and their application to modern experi- 
mental evolution and eugenics. Lectures, reading, and recitations. Prerequisite: 6 
majors. Mj. Summer, Wright; Autumn, Newman; Spring, sec. a, Wright; sec. b, 
Newman. 

201. Invertebrate Zoology I. — Study of representatives of the lower invertebrate 
groups (Protozoa, Porifera, Coelenterata, Plathelminthes, Nemathelminthes, Bryozoa, 
Brachiopoda), including the anatomy of the adult and the life-history, together with 
some discussion of the habits and distribution. Prerequisite: Zoology 103, or equiva- 
lent. Lectures, laboratory work, and demonstrations. Mj. Autumn, Professor Child. 



32 THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO 

202. Invertebrate Zoblogy II. — Comparative anatomy, development, and phytog- 
eny of higher invertebrate groups (Echinodermata, Mollusca, Annelida, Arthropoda). 
Prerequisite: Zoology 103 or equivalent. Mj. Winter, Willier. 

203. Entomology. — A general basis of morphology and classification for a consider- 
ation of the biology of insects, without special reference to economic problems. Pre- 
requisite: Zoology 103 or equivalent. Mj. Summer, Emerson; Spring, . 

205. Vertebrate Zoology. — Comparative anatomy, development, and phytogeny 
of vertebrates. Prerequisite: Zoology 103, or equivalent. Mj. Summer, Winter 
Moore; Spring, Newman. 

207. Field Zoology. — An introduction to local animal life based upon classification, 
distribution, and natural history of representatives of the different animal phyla living 
in this region. Prerequisite: Zoology 103 or Botany 103 or equivalent. Mj. Autumn, 

220. Vertebrate Embryology (for medical students). — Birds and mammals. Lec- 
tures, demonstrations, and laboratory work. Prerequisite: Zoology 103 and 205, or 
their equivalents. Mj. Summer, Autumn, Spring, Moore and Assistants. 

231. Animal Geography. — A study of the world-distribution of animals, together 
with factors causing and limiting distribution. Lectures, conferences, and assigned 
topics. Prerequisite: 18 majors. Mj. Winter, Allee. 

240. Parasitology. — The biology, anatomy, and life-histories of animal parasites. 
Prerequisite: Zoology 103 or 207, or equivalent. Mj. Winter, . 

290, 291, 292, 293. Undergraduate Honors in Zoology. — Informal, individual 
supervision of laboratory, library, or field work in zoology leading to a comprehensive 
examination for departmental honors. Open to qualified students with their major 
sequence in zoology. Registration only after consent of the Department and of the 
instructor concerned. Mj.-3Mjs., Child, Newman, Allee, Wright, Willier. 

301. Comparative Histology. — A comparative study of the structure and function 
of tissues of both invertebrates and vertebrates. Principles and methods of histological 
technique. Prerequisite: Zoology 201, 202 and 205, or their equivalents. Mj. Summer, 
Spring, Willier. 

304. Animal Ecology. — A general survey of the relations between animals and 
their environment, illustrated by field and laboratory studies upon the nature and evolu- 
tion of animal communities in the Chicago area. Prerequisite : Zoology 207, or equiva- 
lent. Mj. Spring, Allee. 

305. Animal Behavior. — Analysis of animal activities with reference to the physi- 
ology and comparative psychology of animals in general, but with particular emphasis 
upon invertebrates and lower vertebrates. Prerequisite: Zoology, 3 majors; Chemistry, 
3 majors. Mj. Summer, Autumn, Allee. 

310. Fundamental Genetics. — Discussion of the mechanism of heredity, involving 
consideration of segregation and random assortment of genes, linkage systems, muta- 
tion, and the relation of these to visible cell processes. Prerequisite : Zoology 103 and 
105. Lectures M., Tu., W., and laboratory. Mj. Summer, Autumn, Wright. 

311. Biometry. — A study of the application of statistical methods to biological 
problems with especial reference to the genetic phenomena of populations. Prerequisite: 
Zoology 310 and Mathematics (Differential, and Integral Calculus) or equivalents. Mj. 
Spring, Wright. 

312. Physiological Genetics. — Discussion of the effects of genes on the develop- 
ment of characteristics involving consideration of the kinds of processes known to be 
influenced by genes and of such phenomena as dominance, multiple allelomorphism, 
polymery and chain effects and of interrelations of genetic and environmental factors. 
Prerequisites: Zoology 310 and 318. Lectures M.,Tu.,W., and laboratory. Mj. Winter, 
Wright. 

313. Statistical Genetics.— Mj. Wright. [Not given in 1929-30.] 

318. Embryology. — The early stages of development of invertebrates and verte- 
brates, including maturation and fertilization of the ovum, cleavage, and the formation 
of the germ layers; origin of the embryo. Embryological theories. Embryological tech- 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOLS 33 

nique. Prerequisite: Zoology 201, 202, 205, or their equivalents. Mj. Autumn, Wil- 
lier. 

319. Embryology. — Continuation of course 318. Later development, especially of 
vertebrates. Prerequisite: Zoology 318. Mj. Winter, Willier. 

320. Physiological Zoology. — The course is concerned with the physiological and 
dynamic aspects of Zoology and consists primarily of laboratory work with some of the 
simpler animals, which is supplemented by lectures, conferences, and reading. Indi- 
vidual work, intended as training in methods, illustration of principles, and preparation 
for research may be assigned to each student. This course is intended primarily for 
graduate students in the Department of Zoology. Conference with the instructor before 
registration is desirable as size of class is limited. In special cases those desiring to 
attend lectures and conferences will be allowed to register for § major. Prerequisite: 
Zoology 103 (or 201), 202, 205, Chemistry 101, 102, 103, or their equivalent. Mj. or 
DMj. Autumn, Child. 

340. Problems in Experimental Embryology. — For advanced students who are pre- 
pared to undertake an individual study of laboratory or library problems in experi- 
mental embryology. Prerequisite: Zoology 318 and 319 or equivalents. Mj. Summer, 
Spring, Willier. 

350. Problems in the Biology of Sex. — Individual instruction and investigation 
of special topics in the biology of sex. Prerequisites: Zoology 103, 205, 220, or equiva- 
lents. Registration only after consultation with instructor. Mj. each Quarter, Moore. 

360. Problems in Animal Behavior and Ecology. — Individual instruction in begin- 
ning research in laboratory, field, or library problems for advanced undergraduate or 
graduate students. Prerequisite: Zoology 231, or 304 or 305. Mj. each Quarter, 
Allee. 

401. Physiology of Development. — A consideration of existing data and views as 
material for a theory of development. Lectures, conferences, assigned topics. Prerequi- 
site: Zoology 318 and 319, or equivalent. Mj. Autumn, Lillie. 

403. Individuation and Reproduction. — A consideration of the problem of organic 
individuality and the processes and conditions of individuation and reproduction. The 
relations between regulatory processes, experimental reproduction, and the various 
processes of reproduction in nature. Lectures, reviews, and discussion of literature. 
Mj. Summer, Spring, Child. 

405. Cytological Problems. — Mj. Child. [Not given in 1929-30.] 

407. Organic Symmetry and Twinning. — An analysis of the basis of symmetry in 
organisms, of the phenomena of asymmetry and reversed symmetry, and especially of 
the causes and consequences of twinning. Mj. Winter, Newman. 

408. Problems in Organic Evolution. — Newman. [Not given in 1929-30.] 

411. Animal Aggregations. — A study of the different types of social organization 
and relations of animals, their origin and effect upon the individual and the species. Mj. 
Autumn, Allee. 

422. The Biology of Sex. — A consideration of the biological problems of sex. Pre- 
requisite: Zoology 401, 407, and either 403 or 405. Mj. Spring, Lillie. 

425. The Problem of Reproduction in Organisms. — Child. [Not given in 1929- 
30.] 

426. Senescence and Rejuvenescence. — Mj. Child. [Not given in 1929-30.] 

452. Zoological Problems. — Research. 1 to 3Mjs. Summer, Child, Allee, Moore, 
Wright, Willier, Emerson. 

453, 454, 455. Zoological Problems. — Research work. For graduate students. Pre- 
requisite: training essential to the special topic undertaken. 1 to 3Mjs. Autumn, 
Winter, Spring, Lillie, Child, Newman, Allee, Moore, Wright, Willier. 

Students interested in the teaching of Zoology should see Special Methods 289, 
page 56, Announcements of the School of Education. 



34 



THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO 



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36 THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO 

THE DEPARTMENT OF ANATOMY 

OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

Robert Russell Bensley, A.B., M.B., Sc.D., Professor of Anatomy. 

Charles Judson Herrick, Ph.D., Professor of Neurology. 

Basil Coleman Hyatt Harvey, A.B., M.D., Professor of Anatomy. 

Preston Kyes, A.M., M.D., Sc.D., Professor of Preventive Medicine. 

George William Bartelmez, Ph.D., Professor of Anatomy. 

Charles Henry Swift, M.D., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Anatomy. 

William Bloom, A.B., M.D., Assistant Professor of Anatomy. 

Normand Hoerr, Ph.D., Instructor in Anatomy. 

William Brooks Steen, S.B., Instructor in Anatomy. 

Emory R. Strauser, Ph.D., Instructor in Preventive Medicine. 

Sylvia Gates Holton, A.B., Instructor in Anatomy. 

Jeannette B. Obenchain, Ph.D., Research Associate in Anatomy. 

Caroline May Bensley, S.B., Research Assistant in Anatomy. 

George Morris McClure, A.B., Assistant in Anatomy. 

Livingstone Eli Josselyn, S.B., Assistant in Anatomy. 



John C. Rogers, Ph.D., Instructor in Preventive Medicine (Summer Quarter, 192Q) 
Emory R. Strauser, Ph.D., Instructor in Anatomy (Summer Quarter, 1929). 

FELLOW 

Truman S. Potter, M.D., Seymour Coman Fellow in Preventive Medicine. 

INTRODUCTORY 

The Department of Anatomy is organized to provide for instruction and research 
in vertebrate anatomy, including human anatomy, histology, embryology, and neurol- 
ogy. 

Students of medicine and other students desiring to study anatomy are strongly 
recommended to plan their work so that courses in vertebrate anatomy (Zoology 205) 
and vertebrate embryology precede the work in human anatomy. 

All students taking courses in Anatomy should have a good knowledge of French 
and German. For graduate students this is indispensable. 

THE BACHELOR'S DEGREE 

On admission to the Senior Colleges, each student specializing in the Department 
will arrange, in consultation with the Departmental Counselor, a program of approxi- 
mately 12 majors to be taken in the Department, or in the Department and related 
departments, in addition to work completed in the Junior Colleges. 

HIGHER DEGREES 

For detailed statement concerning University requirements for higher degrees, see 
the Handbook of the Graduate Schools. 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOLS 37 

THE MASTER OF SCIENCE DEGREE 

Departmental prerequisites. — Candidates for the degree of Master of Science in 
Anatomy are required to take courses in Anatomy amounting to 9 majors, of which 3 
majors must be in research work chosen from courses 428, 433, 441. Not more than 
2 majors from the 200 group of courses may be counted toward this degree. 

THE DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY DEGREE 

Departmental prerequisites. — Candidates for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in 
Anatomy should have undergraduate credit for courses 201, 202, 203, 204, 210, 317, or 
their equivalents. Graduate courses will be selected after consultation with the Depart- 
ment. 

THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF MEDICINE 

All candidates for the degree of Doctor of Medicine are required to take courses 
in Anatomy (including Embryology) amounting to 4 majors, and to pass an examination 
covering Embryology, Histology, and Organology, Gross Anatomy, and Neurology. 
This examination will be given at the end of each Spring Quarter and candidates will 
apply for it at least one month in advance. 

201-2. Dissection of the Upper and Lower Extremities. — The student makes a 
complete dissection of these parts using atlases to learn the nomenclature. The skeleton 
is studied coincidently in conference classes. The work is demonstrated daily to instruc- 
tors and there are frequent conferences in the laboratory. l|Mjs. Summer, Harvey, 
Swift, Josselyn; Autumn, Winter, Spring, Harvey, Swift, Hoerr, Josselyn, 
McClure. 

210. Histology. — A brief course on the structure of the cell and elementary tissues 
will be followed by a systematic study of the structure of organs. Mj. Summer, 
Strauser. 

211. Cytology and Histology. — The structure of the cell and of the elementary 
tissues. Mj. Autumn, Bensley, Holton. 

231. Preventive Medicine and Immunology. — Introductory course on the produc- 
tion of disease by bacterial parasites, with especial consideration of the host reactions 
which favor the prevention and cure of such diseases. Lectures and demonstrations. 
Mj. Autumn, Kyes. 

In these courses the student makes a complete dissection of the parts. Atlases and 
textbooks will be used as guides. Special conference classes deal with the osteology. 
There are frequent conferences in the laboratory. Principles of morphology, considera- 
tion of development, and the adaptation of structure to function will be taken up in 
these conferences and in the lectures. Summer, Harvey, Swift, Josselyn; Autumn, 
Winter, Spring, Harvey, Swift, Hoerr, Josselyn, McClure. 

303. Dissection of Thorax and Abdomen. — lMj. and, 

304. Dissection of Head and Neck. — lMj. 

311. Microscopic Anatomy. — Structure of the more complex tissues and organs. 
Mj. Winter, Bensley, Bloom, Holton. 

312. Histology of the Organs of Internal Secretion. — Mj. Spring, Bensley, 
Holton. 

314. History, Methods, and Results of Tissue Culture. — Lectures and Demon- 
stration. Mj. Autumn, Bloom. 

316. Elementary Neurology. — Course designed especially for graduate students 
in psychology. Others may be admitted after consultation with the instructor. Mj. 
Autumn, Herrick. 

317. Anatomy of the Nervous System. — An introductory course for medical stu- 
dents and others. Prerequisite: Anatomy 304, Histology, and Zoology 220. Mj. Sum- 
mer, Hoerr; Autumn, Winter, Bartelmez, Steen. 



38 THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO 

319. Comparative Neurology. — Mj. Herrick. [Not given in 1929-30.] 

321. Development of the Skeleton. — A laboratory study of the development of the 
cartilaginous and bony skeleton in man on the basis of gross preparations and serial 
sections. May include the histogenesis of bone. Prerequisite: Histology and Zool- 
ogy 219 or 220. Mj. or |Mj. Spring, Bartelmez. 

322. Anatomy of the Foetus and Infant. — Mj. Autumn, Winter, Spring, Swift, 

HOERR, SXEEN. 

323. Structure of the Female Reproductive Organs. — Prerequisite: Zoology 220 
and Histology. Mj. Spring, Bartelmez. 

324. Organogeny. — This course affords an opportunity to work on material in the 
Human Embryological Collection which comprises about twelve hundred specimens 
ranging from three weeks old to full term. A single system of organs may be studied 
in detail or several systems may be selected according to individual needs. Prerequisite : 
Histology and Zoology 219 or 220. Mj. or DMj. Spring, Bartelmez. 

331. Preventive Medicine and Immunology. — Lecture and laboratory course on 
host susceptibility and resistance to infection. Mj. or DMj. Summer, Rogers; Winter, 
Kyes, Rogers, Strauser. 

332. Preventive Medicine and Immunology. — Continuation of course 331 with 
special consideration of immune sera and of the qualitative and quantitative estima- 
tions of toxins and antitoxins. Mj. or DMj. Spring, Kyes, Strauser. 

333. Morphology and Histogenesis of the Blood and Connective Tissues. — Mj. 
Spring, Bloom. 

341. Advanced Work. — Opportunities are afforded for advanced work in all 
branches of anatomy. Bensley, Herrick, Harvey, and Others. 

349, 350, 351. History of Anatomy. — §Mj. Autumn, Winter, Spring, Swift. 

428. Neurological Research. — Admission to this course may be obtained only after 
consultation with the instructor in neurology. A good knowledge of general anatomy, 
physiology, and neurology will be required. Mj. or DMj. Summer, Autumn, Winter, 
Herrick. 

433. Research in Preventive Medicine and Immunology. — Mj. or DMj. Summer, 
Autumn, Winter, Spring, Kyes, Rogers, Strauser. 

441. Research Work. — The laboratory is equipped for the investigation of ana- 
tomical problems. Suitably trained persons, who have the time to do such work, will 
be encouraged to undertake it. Summer, Autumn, Winter, Spring, Bensley, Harvey, 
Swift. 

442. Research in Tissue Culture. — General problems of histology are studied by 
the method of cultivation of tissues in Vitro. 3Mjs. Autumn, Winter, Spring, Bloom. 

443. Research in Human Embryology. — The human embryological collection is 
available for the study of problems in developments to students who are adequately 
trained. Mj. or DMj. Autumn, Winter, Spring, Bartelmez. 

445, 446, 447. Seminar. — A limited number of students may, by arrangement with 
the Professor of Anatomy, be admitted to a seminar in which subjects of current 
interest in anatomy will be discussed. |Mj. Autumn, Winter, Spring, Bensley, Swift. 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOLS 



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201, 202. Dissection of Arm and Leg 
Lect.: M.,2:30 -(Harvey, Swift) 
Lab.: M., 3:30-5:30 

Tu.,W.,Th.,F.,2:30-5:30 
1| Mjs. 

303. Dissection of Thorax and Abdo- 
men (Harvey, Swift) 
Lect.: Tu.,2:30 

Lab.: 8 hrs. per week 

304. Dissection of Head and Neck 
Lect.: W., 2:30 (Harvey, Swift) 
Lab.: 8 hrs. per week 




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317. Anatomy of the Nervous System 
(Bartelmez) 
Lect.: W., 11:00 
Lab.: M., Tu., Th., F., 11:00- 
1:00 


201, 202. Dissection of Arm and Leg 
Lect.: M., 2:30 (Harvey, Swift) 
Lab.: M., 3:30-5:30 

Tu.,W.,Th.,F.,2:30-5:30 
U Mjs. 

303. Dissection of Thorax and Abdo- 
men (Harvey, Swift) 
Lect.: Tu.,2:30 

Lab.: 8 hrs. per week 

304. Dissection of Head and Neck 
Lect.: W., 230 (Harvey, Swift) 
Lab.: 8 hrs. per week 




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211. Cytology and Histology 

(Bensley, Holton) 

W.,Th.,F.,8:00-10:00 
316. Elementary Neurology (Herrick) 

Lect.: M., 9:00-10:00 

Lab.: Tu., W., Th., 8:00-10:00 




' 


317. Anatomy of the Nervous System 
(Bartelmez) 
Lect.: W., 11:00 
Lab.: M., Tu., Th., F., 11:00- 
1:00 


201, 202. Dissection of Arm and Leg 
Lect.: M., 2:30 (Harvey, Swift) 
Lab.: M., 3:30-5:30 

Tu.,W.,Th.,F.,2:30-5:30 
1§ Mjs. 

303. Dissection of Thorax and Abdo- 
men (Harvey, Swift) 
Lect.: Tu.,2:30 

Lab.: 8 hrs. per week 

304. Dissection of Head and Neck 
Lect.: W., 2:30 (Harvey, Swift) 
Lab.: 8 hrs. per week 




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317. Anatomy of the Nervous System 
(Hoerr) 
Lect.: M.,Tu., 11:00 
Recit.: Tu., 12:00 
Lab.: W.,Th.,F., 11:00-1:00 


201, 202. Dissection of Arm and Leg 
1J Mjs. (Harvey, Swift) 

303. Dissection of Thorax and Abdo- 
men (Harvey) 
2:30-5:30 

304. Dissection of Head and Neck 
2:30-5:30 (Harvey, Swift) 




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THE MEDICAL SCHOOLS 41 



THE DEPARTMENT OF PHYSIOLOGY 

OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

Anton Julius Carlson, Chairman of the Department of Physiology. 
Nathaniel Kleitman, Secretary of the Department. 



Anton Julius Carlson, Ph.D., M.D., LL.D., Professor of Physiology. 

Arno Benedict Luckhardt, Ph.D., M.D., Professor of Physiology. 

Ralph Stayner Lillie, Ph.D., Professor of Physiology. 

Nathaniel Kleitman, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Physiology. 

Ralph Waldo Gerard, Ph.D., M.D., Assistant Professor of Physiology. 

Eugene Updyke Still, Ph.D., Instructor in Physiology. 

Marie Agnes Hinrichs, Ph.D., Research Associate in Physiology. 

Edmund Jacobson, Ph.D., M.D., Research Associate in Physiology. 

Victor E. Johnson, S.B., Assistant in Physiology. 

S. A. Szurek, S.B., Assistant in Physiology. 

Zachary A. Blier, S.B., Assistant in Physiology. 

Ruth Kern, S.B., Technical Assistant in Physiology. 

Margaret Day McIntyre, S.B., Technical Assistant in Physiology. 



Davdd Judson Lingle, Ph.D., Associate Professor Emeritus of Physiology. 

FELLOWS, 1929-30 

Octavio Barbosa Couto-Silva, M.D. (Rockefeller Foundation). 
William John Gallagher, M.D. (Seymour Coman Fellow). 
Li Sribyatta, M.D. (Rockefeller Foundation). 
Dorothy Fetter, S.M. (John Jelke, Jr., Fellowship). 
Everette I. Solomon, S.B. (T. J. Williams Fellow). 
Heinrich Necheles, Ph.D., M.D. (Rockefeller Foundation). 



INTRODUCTORY 

The courses of the Department of Physiology are arranged for four classes of 
"students: 

I. Junior and Senior College students who desire some knowledge of human 
physiology, foods, and personal hygiene as an educational equipment for life. 

II. Junior or Senior College students who wish to acquire a more extensive knowl- 
edge of the structure and functions of the human body, or who wish to study biology 
from the physiological side. To satisfy the needs of these students and enable them 
to cover the subject satisfactorily, a three-major course is given: courses 102, 103, and 
104, Introductory Physiology. 

III. Students wishing to specialize in Physiology, or students of other biological 
sciences who wish to take minor work in advanced Physiology. 

IV. Medical students. 



42 THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO 

THE BACHELOR'S DEGREE 

On admission to the Senior Colleges, each student specializing in the Department 
will arrange, in consultation with the Departmental Counselor, a progressive, sequen- 
tial program of approximately 12 courses in the Department or in the Department and 
related departments in addition to those completed in the Junior Colleges. 

The required courses in the Department are 202 or 203, 204, 251, and 252. With 
the approval of the Counselor, courses may be selected from the following: Psychol- 
ogy 111; Chemistry 240, 261; Physiological Chemistry 201, 302; Botany 120; Anat- 
omy 210; Zoology 220, 301, 319; Bacteriology 201. 

HIGHER DEGREES 
For detailed statement concerning University requirements for higher degrees, see 
the Handbook of the Graduate Schools. 

THE MASTER OF SCIENCE DEGREE 

Departmental prerequisites. — (1) Research, at least 3 majors (course 411); (2) 2-5 
majors from the courses numbered 300 or higher in Physiology and related sciences. 
Courses 251, 252 may be counted in these 5 majors; (3) thesis. 

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY DEGREE 

Departmental prerequisites. — Courses 251, 252, 303, and Physiological Chemistry 
201 and 302, or their equivalents, and 2-4 additional majors in the 300-400 group in 
Physiology and Physiological Chemistry are required of all candidates for the Doctor's 
degree. The candidate must also participate in the weekly seminar in the Physiology 
group. The further selection of work is arranged in each case by consultation. 

THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF MEDICINE 

Four majors of work in the Departments of Physiology, Physiological Chemistry 
and Pharmacology is the minimum requirement of all candidates for the degree of 
Doctor of Medicine. For these candidates practical, written, and oral examinations 
covering the subject matter of Physiology 251, 252, and 303 will be offered during the 
Winter Quarter. 

A candidate for the degree of Doctor of Medicine who elects to do his research 
leading to the required thesis in the Department of Physiology will be guided in the 
selection and experimental development of his research problem. The candidate should 
plan to give at least four to five majors consecutive time to this work. He should also 
complete two to four majors in the 300 and 400 courses in addition to the minimum 
requirement in the Physiology group, and participate in the weekly seminar of the 
Physiology group for at least three quarters. 

Courses 202, 203, and 204 are intended for college students who aim to secure a 
more detailed and comprehensive knowledge of physiology. These courses prepare the 
student for advanced work in physiology and are useful to students who intend to 
specialize in other branches of biology. Course 203 is particularly helpful to students in 
Home Economics. 

202. Physiology of Muscle, Nerve, Reflexes, Blood, and Circulation. — Prerequi- 
site: Physics 102, Chemistry 101. Mj. Autumn, Kleitman and Assistant. 

203. Physiology of Respiration, Digestion, Secretion, Absorption, and Metabolism. 

— Prerequisite: Physics 102, Chemistry 101. Mj. Winter, Kleitman and Assistant. 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOLS 43 

204. Physiology of Central Nervous System, Special Senses, Internal Secretion, 
and Reproduction. — Prerequisite: Physics 102, Chemistry 101. Mj. Spring, Kleitman 
and Assistant. 

205. Undergraduate Honors Course in Physiology. — An introduction to research. 
Mj. Prerequisite: Physiology 202, 203, 204 or equivalents, and consent of instructor. 
Each quarter, Kleitman, Gerard. 

25 1. 1 Physiology of Blood, Circulation, and Respiration. — Lectures and recitations, 
3 hours a week; laboratory work, 6 hours a week. Prerequisite: Physiology 202 or 
equivalent. Mj. Summer, Spring, Carlson and Assistants. 

252. 1 Physiology of Digestion, Metabolism, Absorption, Secretion, Excretion, 
Muscles, and Heat. — Lectures and recitations, 3 hours a week; laboratory, 6 hours a 
week. Prerequisite: Physiology 251. Mj. Summer, Autumn, Luckhardt, Still, and 
Assistants. 

303. 1 Physiology of the Nervous System and the Senses. — Lectures, two a week; 
recitation and conference, one a week; laboratory, 6 hours a week. Prerequisite: 
Anatomy 317 and Physiology 251. Mj. Summer, Kleitman and Assistants; Winter, 
Luckhardt, Kleitman, Gerard, and Assistants. 

304. Special Physiology of Mammals. — Including the experiments not given in 
the general courses. Prerequisite: Physiology 251, 252, or 303, or equivalent. |Mj. 
Winter, Luckhardt. 

305. The Principles of Physiology. — As they are applied to the clinical examination 
of the central nervous system and special senses. Laboratory work limited to ten stu- 
dents; registration for laboratory by conference with instructor. |Mj. or lMj. Spring, 
Luckhardt. 

307. Principles and Problems of Human Nutrition and Dietetics. — Prerequisite: 
Physiology 252. Laboratory work limited to ten students; registration for laboratory 
by conference with instructor. Mj. Autumn, Still. 

312. Advanced Physiology of the Central Nervous System. — Prerequisite: Physi- 
ology 303. |Mj. or lMj. Autumn, Kleitman. 

401. Advanced Physiology of the Gastrointestinal Tract. — Mj. Summer, Still. 

403, 404, 405. General Physiology of Protoplasm. — Properties and physico- 
chemical constitution of living matter; role of surface processes in living matter; relation 
of colloids to protoplasmic structure; permeability and dependent phenomena; influence 
of chemical and physical agents on protoplasm; irritability and its modifications; 
stimulation and inhibition; transmission in nerve and other protoplasmic systems; 
special activities (contraction, secretion, etc.). Prerequisite: Inorganic and Organic 
Chemistry, General Physics, General Zoology or Botany, Introductory Physiology. 
3Mjs. Autumn, Winter, Spring, Lillie and Assistants. 

407. Special Physiology of the Glands of Internal Secretion. — Laboratory work 
limited to ten students; registration for laboratory by conference with instructor. |Mj. 
or Mj. Summer, Winter, Carlson, Luckhardt, and Assistants. 

409. Seminar in Physiology Group. — Weekly. No credit. Summer, Autumn, Win- 
ter, Spring, Carlson, Luckhardt, Koch, Lillie, Van Dyke, Kleitman, Hanke. 

411. Research in Physiology. — Mj. or DMj. each Quarter, Carlson, Luckhardt, 
Kleitman, Gerard. 

413. Research in General Physiology. — Mj. or DMj. Autumn, Winter, Spring, 
Lillie. 

1 Courses 251, 252, and 303 will be repeated in the Summer Quarter, 1929. 



44 



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THE MEDICAL SCHOOLS 45 



THE DEPARTMENT OF PHYSIOLOGICAL 
CHEMISTRY AND PHARMACOLOGY 

A. OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION IN PHYSIOLOGICAL 
CHEMISTRY 

Fred Conrad Koch, Chairman of the Department of Physiological Chemistry and 
Pharmacology. 

Fred Conrad Koch, Ph.D., Professor of Physiological Chemistry. 

Martin Edward Hanke, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Physiological Chemistry. 

Ida Kraus-Ragins, Ph.D., Instructor in Physiological Chemistry. 

Elizabeth Miller Koch, Ph.D., Research Instructor in Physiological Chemistry 

under the Douglas Smith Foundation. 
Felix Wadsworth Saunders, Ph.D., Instructor in Physiological Chemistry. 
Milnor Richmond Freeland, S.B., Assistant in Physiological Chemistry. 
Chester Davis, S.B., Assistant in Physiological Chemistry. 
Kathryn Knowlton, S.M., Assistant in Physiological Chemistry. 
Clarence Kilgore Elliott, A.B., Assistant in Physiological Chemistry. 

Reuben Gilbert Gustavson, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry, University of Denver 
(Summer, 1929). 

FELLOWS, 1929-30 
Versa Viola Cole, S.M. 
Rose Z. Felsher, S.B. 
Millicent Louise Hathaway, A.M. 

Leo Tolstoi Samuels, A.B., Evaporated Milk Association Fellow. 
Zonja Wallen-Lawrence, S.B., Evaporated Milk Association Fellow. 
Aaron Baker Kendrick, A.B., Meat Packers Institute. 
Thomas Francis Gallagher, A.B., Fellow in Sex Research. 
George Frederick Harsh, A.B., Mead Johnson Fellow. 
John Theobald Hauch, S.B., Mead Johnson Fellow. 

B. OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION IN PHARMACOLOGY 

Harry Benjamin van Dyke, Ph.D., M.D., Associate Professor of Pharmacology. 
Archibald Ross McIntyre, Assistant in Pharmacology. 
Richard Klatte Schmitt, A.B., Assistant in Pharmacology. 
John Greggs Hand, A.B., Assistant in Pharmacology. 

INTRODUCTORY 

Physiological Chemistry, or Biochemistry, has as its field the chemistry of the cells 
and tissues of plants and animals, the principles of nutrition, the chemistry of the 
internal secretions, the chemical correlation of the organs of the body, the chemistry 
of the digestive processes and of the secretions and excretions; the chemical basis of 
such problems as those of pigmentation, inheritance, fertilization, irritability, and so 
on. It has to do also with the derangement of chemical processes in disease. The science 
thus stands in a close and complementary relation with zoology, botany, anatomy, 



46 THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO 

pathology, physical physiology, and bacteriology on the one hand and with chemistry 
on the other. 

Pharmacology is primarily concerned with the changes in the physiology of all 
organisms as a result of the administration of substances not primarily used as foods. 
Its subject matter is in part identical with that of toxicology. Pharmacology also at- 
tempts to furnish a general physiological basis for the application of drugs in the 
treatment of disease. 

Of the courses offered in this Department, 201 and 302 are intended for medical and 
graduate students. They embrace the chemistry of the cells and tissues, of digestion, 
and of excretions. They are the minimum requirement for students of medicine in 
Physiological Chemistry. Medical students who wish to take more advanced work are 
advised to take courses 303 or 311. Many of the methods learned in these courses are 
of value in medical research and in clinical work. 

Graduate students in Physiological Chemistry or in other departments must take 
courses 201 and 302 or the equivalent. For more advanced work they are advised to 
choose from courses 303, 311, 313, 315, 321, 322, and 331, depending on the nature of 
their field of work. Course 303 is strongly recommended for all graduate students taking 
Physiological Chemistry as a minor. Courses 311 and 313 give the practical training in 
methods as applied to blood, urine, and tissue. Course 313 is good training for those 
who intend to enter government service or commercial laboratories dealing particularly 
with foods and drugs and their control. Students requiring more special training in 
Physiological Chemistry should take courses 303, 311, 315, 321, and 322. 

In Pharmacology, course 351 covers the principles of the pharmacodynamic action 
of drugs and is particularly intended for medical students. 

The Department is particularly desirous of stimulating research, but only when 
the student has been properly prepared to do the work well. After the research is 
under way the student is advised to devote practically all of his time to that study rather 
than to taking unrelated courses of instruction. 

It is advisable that a student who proposes to specialize in this Department should 
obtain a broad scientific foundation, including work in the cognate sciences. Specifically, 
it is recommended that the student pursue the following courses in introduction: Phys- 
ics 101, 102, 111, 112; Chemistry 104, 105, 120, 140, 240; Physiology 202, 203, or Zoology 
103 or 201; Botany 101 and 102; Geology 101; in addition, modern languages, one or 
more courses in Histology and the Comparative Anatomy of Vertebrates, and a course 
in Calculus. 

THE BACHELOR'S DEGREE 

Since Physiological Chemistry presupposes a thorough training in both chemistry 
and biology it can only be studied after preparation in these other sciences. For that 
reason it cannot usually be undertaken before the third college year. 

HIGHER DEGREES 
For detailed statement concerning the University requirements for higher degrees, 
see the Handbook of the Graduate Schools. 

THE MASTER OF SCIENCE DEGREE 

Departmental prerequisites. — (1) Research, 3 majors (courses 401, 402 or 451); (2) 6 
majors from graduate courses; (3) thesis; (4) take part in the Departmental Seminar. 
The graduate courses that may be counted toward the Master's degree are 201, 302, 
351,303,311,321. 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOLS 47 

THE DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY DEGREE 

Departmental prerequisites. — In Physiological Chemistry courses 201, 302, and 303, 
or their equivalent, and 3 or 4 majors in special methods and preparations, are required 
of all candidates for the Doctor's degree. In Physiology, courses 251, 252, and 303 or 
the equivalent are required. Knowledge of physical and organic chemistry and of the 
literature and history of physiological chemistry are also required. Main emphasis is 
laid,, however, upon ability to do original and accurate research work. Candidates must 
take part in the seminars. 

For the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Pharmacology a thorough knowledge 
of physiology, physiological chemistry, toxicology, as well as of the history and liter- 
ature of pharmacology and the completion of original research work, are required. 
Candidates must take part in the seminars. 

THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF MEDICINE 

The requirements for the degree of Doctor of Medicine include (a) a minimum of 
four majors in the group consisting of the Departments of Physiology and Physio- 
logical Chemistry and Pharmacology; (b) the successful passing of a final examination 
in the Department of Physiological Chemistry and Pharmacology. This department 
will offer its final examination to candidates for the foregoing degree at the close of 
the Autumn and Spring Quarters respectively and the subject matter covered will be 
equivalent to that covered by courses 201, 302, and 351. Credit for the individual 
majors will be withheld until the passing of this final examination. 

If a candidate wishes to conduct his research, leading to the required thesis for the 
degree of Doctor of Medicine, in this department it is suggested that he taken course 201 
or the equivalent before entering the medical school. It is furthermore desirable that 
he take additional courses as far as possible in chemistry and in physiological chemistry 
prior to undertaking the actual researches in this department. The student's program 
should be so arranged that the research problem will require from three to six majors, 
extended over a period of from three to four quarters. The thesis should fulfil the 
general requirements for the degree of Doctor of Medicine. The candidate should also 
take part in the seminars of the Physiology Group. 

A. COURSES OF INSTRUCTION IN PHYSIOLOGICAL 
CHEMISTRY 

20 1. 1 Physiological Chemistry. — Chemistry of the carbohydrates, lipins, and pro- 
teins and the general chemistry of the cell. Lectures, two a week; recitations, one a 
week; laboratory, 6 hours a week. Prerequisite : General Chemistry, Qualitative Analy- 
sis, Organic Chemistry, and Quantitative Analysis. Mj. Summer, Hanke and Assist- 
ants; Autumn, Saunders and Assistants; Winter, Gustavson, Kraus-Ragins, and 
Assistants. 

302. 1 Physiological Chemistry. — Chemistry of digestion, metabolism, and excre- 
tion. Lectures and recitations, three a week; laboratory, 6 hours a week. Prerequisite: 
Physiological Chemistry 201. Mj. Summer, Gustavson and Assistants; Autumn, 
Hanke and Assistants; Spring, Gustavson and Assistants. 

303. Physico-Chemical Methods Applied to Biochemical Problems. — Freezing- 
points; electric conductivity; surface tension; hydrogen ion determination; polarimetry, 
viscosity, etc. Practical work. Lectures, two a week; laboratory about 9 hours a week. 
Prerequisites: Physiological Chemistry 201 and 302, Physical Chemistry and Quanti- 
tative Analysis. £Mj. or Mj. Summer, Winter, Spring, Hanke, Saunders. 

1 Courses 201 and 302 cover the work required of medical students in Physiological Chemistry. 



48 THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO 

311. Quantiative Methods of Urine and Blood Analysis. — Determination of im- 
portant constituents of the urine and blood. Prerequisite: Physiological Chemistry 
302, or equivalent, and quantitative analysis. JMj. or Mj. Summer, Koch; Autumn, 
Gustavson; Spring, Koch. 

313. Methods of Quantitative Analysis in Physiological Chemistry as Applied to 
Plant and Animal Tissues. — Prerequisite: quantitative analysis and Physiological 
Chemistry 201. Mj. Summer, Koch. 

315. Methods of Quantitative Analysis of a Protein. — Prerequisite: quantitative 
analysis and Physiological Chemistry 201. Mj. Summer, Autumn, Winter, Kraus- 
Ragins. 

321. Biochemical Preparations. — Prerequisite: Physiological Chemistry 201. Mj. 
Summer, Koch; Autumn, Winter, ; Spring, Koch. 

322. Biochemical Preparations. — Continuation of 321. Mj. Summer, Spring, 
Koch. 

331. The Biochemistry of Internal Secretions. — Koch. [Not given in 1929-30.] 

401. Research in Physiological Chemistry. — Mj. or DMj. each Quarter, Koch, 
Gustavson, Hanke, Kraus-Ragins, Saunders. 

402. Research in Physical-Chemical Aspects of Physiological Chemistry. — Each 
Quarter, Hanke, Saunders. 

410. Seminar in the Physiology Group. — A joint seminar in Physiology, Physio- 
logical Chemistry, and Pharmacology. Discussion of important books, papers, and 
research reports. Weekly. No credit. Conducted by the instructors of the Depart- 
ments. 

B. COURSES OF INSTRUCTION IN PHARMACOLOGY 

251. Introductory Pharmacology. — Open to all students of medicine. An intro- 
ductory and supplementary course to Pharmacology 351. It consists of the principles 
of prescription writing, the chemistry of drugs, and the study of such drugs as are not 
readily adaptable to laboratory demonstration, but are commonly used in medicine. 
The laboratory work in the course consists essentially in the study of the chemical 
and pharmacological detection of the more powerful medicinal drugs and poisons. 
Lectures only, |Mj. Lectures and Laboratory, Mj. Autumn, van Dyke and Assist- 
ant. 

351. Pharmacology. — This course consists of the physiological analysis or interpre- 
tation of the action of the more important drugs. Lectures and recitations, 3 hours a 
week; laboratory, 6 hours a week. It is essential that the student be well acquainted 
with the subject matter and methods of physiology (e.g. courses 251, 252, and 303), 
and Physiological Chemistry (e.g. courses 201 and 302). Mj. Summer, Winter, Spring, 
van Dyke and x\ssistants. 

352. Special Problems in Pharmacology. — Laboratory work of advanced character 
in special problems in pharmacology. Mj. Summer, Autumn, Spring, van Dyke. 

451. Research in Pharmacology. — Mj. or DMj. each Quarter, van Dyke. 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOLS 



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THE MEDICAL SCHOOLS 51 

THE DEPARTMENT OF PATHOLOGY 

OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

Ludvig Hektoen, Head of the Department of Pathology, Director of the John McCor- 

mick Institute for Infectious Diseases. 
Harry Gideon Wells, Chairman of the Department; Director of the Otho S. A. 

Sprague Memorial Institute. 



Ludvig Hektoen, M.D., Sc.D., LL.D., Professor of Pathology. 

Harry Gideon Wells, Ph.D., M.D., Professor of Pathology. 

Esmond Ray Long, Ph.D., M.D., Professor of Pathology. 

Paul Roberts Cannon, Ph.D., M.D., Associate Professor of Pathology. 

BelA Halpert, M.D., Assistant Professor of Pathology. 

Mercy Aurora Southwick, M.D., Curator and Instructor in Pathological Technic. 

Patrick Arthur Delaney, Ph.D., M.D., Douglas Smith Fellow in Pathology. 

Eleanor Mary Humphreys, A.B., Assistant in Pathology. 

Arthur John Vorwald, S.B., Assistant in Pathology. 



MEMBERS OF THE OTHO S. A. SPRAGUE MEMORIAL INSTITUTE STAFF 

Maud Slye, A.B., Associate Professor of Pathology. 

Milton Theodore Hanke, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Biochemistry. 

Harriet F. Holmes, A.B., Research Associate in Pathology. 

Julian Herman Lewis, Ph.D., M.D., Assistant Professor of Pathology. 

Siegfried Maurer, S.B., M.D., Assistant Professor of Pathology. 

Florence Barbara Seibert, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Pathology. 

William Robinson, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Pathology. 

Hilmeyer Cohen, Ph.D., Instructor in Pathology. 

Marion Smoot Needels, A.B., Instructor in Pathology. 

Edith Farrar, A.B., Assistant in Pathology. 



AT RUSH MEDICAL COLLEGE 

Ludvig Hektoen, M.D., Sc.D., LL.D., Professor of Pathology. 
Edwin Raymond LeCount, M.D., Professor and Chairman of the Department of 
Pathology. 

George Howitt Weaver, M.D., Professor of Pathology. 
Edwin Frederick Hirsch, Ph.D., M.D., Assistant Professor of Pathology. 
Carl Wesley Apfelbach, M.D., Assistant Professor of Pathology; Resident Patholo- 
gist, Presbyterian Hospital. 
George J. Rukstinat, Ph.D., Instructor in Pathology. 
Celestin B. Semerak, M.D., Assistant in Pathology. 
Harold Goldthorpe, M.D., Assistant in Pathology. 
G. Bernice Rhodes, A.M., Assistant in Pathology. 



Richard Jaffe, M.D., Professorial Lecturer on Pathology. 



52 THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO 



INTRODUCTORY 

The courses offered in the University by the Department include the required 
work in Pathology in the curriculum of the study of Medicine, as well as advanced 
courses arranged for those desiring a more extended knowledge of the subject, and for 
those wishing to qualify themselves for research. 

HIGHER DEGREES 

For detailed statement concerning the University requirements for higher degrees, 
see the Handbook of the Graduate Schools. 

THE MASTER OF SCIENCE DEGREE 

Departmental prerequisites. — A dissertation and 8 majors of graduate work in 
Pathology are required, if all the work is in Pathology. Substitution of courses in 
Bacteriology and Immunity may be made with the approval of the Head of the Depart- 
ment, but courses 301, 302, 303, and at least 3 majors of research must be taken in 
Pathology. 

THE, DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY DEGREE 

Departmental prerequisites. — Courses required of all candidates are Pathology 
301, 302, and at least 3 majors in course 303; also Bacteriology 202, and a course cover- 
ing the fundamental principles and methods of Immunology. Courses in Hygiene and 
Bacteriology may be accepted as equivalent to courses in Pathology to a maximum of 5 
majors with the approval of the Head of the Department. A dissertation^must be 
presented representing the results of original research under the direction of an officer 
of the Department, but so conducted as to indicate the ability of the candidate to con- 
duct independent original investigation. 

THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF MEDICINE 

The minimum course requirement for the degree of Doctor of Medicine in the 
Departments of Hygiene and Bacteriology, and Pathology consists of three majors in 
these departments. 

Before being recommended for the degree of Doctor of Medicine the student will 
be required to pass an examination to determine that he has secured a reasonable 
familiarity with the general principles of Hygiene, Bacteriology, and Pathology, ir- 
respective of whether this knowledge has been acquired through work in these depart- 
ments or in other departments of the Graduate School of Medicine. Credits for indi- 
vidual majors taken in these departments are conditional upon passing the general 
examination. This examination will be given only to students who have completed at 
least two and one-half years of work in medicine, at times to be announced by the de- 
partments. 

Students who elect to meet the special requirements for the degree of Doctor of 
Medicine in the Department of Pathology must have done advanced work in excess of 
the minimum requirements as stated above during at least three quarters, leading to 
the preparation of a dissertation acceptable to the Department of Pathology, and con- 
stituting an actual contribution to knowledge. 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOLS 53 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

301. General Pathology and Pathological Histology. — A practical laboratory course 
in general pathologic histology, supplemented by the study of gross specimens, attend- 
ance at necropsies, and by recitations in general pathology. Prerequisite: Histology, 
Bacteriology, Physiology, Physiological Chemistry, and Visceral Anatomy. Laboratory, 
recitations, and lectures; 9 hours a week. DM. Summer, First Term; Mj. Autumn, 
Winter, Long, Cannon, Halpert, and Assistants. 

302. Pathology of Infectious Granulomas and Tumors. — DM. Summer, Second 
Term; Mj. Winter, Spring, Long, Cannon, Halpert, and Assistants. 

303. Advanced Pathology. — Open to a limited number of students who have credit 
in general pathology. Laboratory work will be given in pathological technique, the 
study and recording of necropsies, and special pathological material. Hours to be ar- 
ranged for each student. Mj. each Quarter, Wells, Southwick. 

304. Special Pathology. — Supplementary to and paralleling course 302. A study of 
the pathological changes affecting different organs and tissues. Prerequisite: Pathology 
301. Mj. Spring, Long, Halpert, and Assistants. 

305. Defensive Mechanisms of the Body. — A conference and laboratory course 
on the methods employed by the body in defense against disease. Prerequisite: General 
Bacteriology. Mj. Autumn, Wells, Cannon. 

306. Clinical-Pathological Conferences. — Joint conferences of clinical departments 
with the department of Pathology on correlation of clinical studies with necropsy find- 
ings. No credit. Wells, McLean, Phemister, and Others. 

401. Research in Pathology. — Open to a limited number of qualified students and 
graduates in medicine. Hours to be arranged for each student. Mj. or DMj. each 
Quarter, Hektoen, Wells, Long, Cannon, Halpert. 



54 



THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO 



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THE MEDICAL SCHOOLS 55 



THE DEPARTMENT OF HYGIENE AND 
BACTERIOLOGY 

OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

Edwin Oakes Jordan, Chairman of the Department of Hygiene and Bacteriology. 

Edwin Oakes Jordan, Ph.D., Sc.D., Professor of Bacteriology. 

William Hay Taliaferro, Ph.D., Professor of Parasitology. 

Dudley Billings Reed, M.TP., Professor of Hygiene; Director of the Health Service. 

Isddore Sydney Falk, Ph.D., Professor of Bacteriology. 

Stewart Armend Koser, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Bacteriology. 

Lucy Graves Taliaferro, Sc.D., Research Associate in Parasitology. 

Gail Monroe Dack, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Bacteriology. 

Howard John Shaughnessy, Ph.D., Instructor in Hygiene. 

Adah Elizabeth Verder, Ph.D., Instructor in Bacteriology. 

George William Stuppy, S.M., Instructor under the Douglas Smith Foundation. 

Frances Coventry, Sc.D., Research Associate on the Logan Fund. 

Mary Eugenie Maver, Ph.D., Research Associate on the Logan Fund. 

Roland Wendell Harrison, S.M., Assistant in Bacteriology. 

Carl Oswald Lathrop, Sc.M., A.M., Assistant in Bacteriology. 

Einar Leifson, S.B., Assistant in Bacteriology. 

Denis Raymond A. Wharton, B.S.A., Assistant in Bacteriology. 

Philip SHm-Cm Kao, S.B., Curator. 

Herman N. Bundesen, M.D., Professorial Lecturer in Public Health Administration. 
Alton Stackhouse Pope, M.D., D.P.H., Professorial Lecturer in Epidemiology, Chief, 

Bureau of Communicable Diseases, Department of Health, Chicago. 
Roland Wendell Harrison, S.M., Extension Instructor in Bacteriology. 

Stanhope Bayne-Jones, A.M., M.D., Professor of Bacteriology, University of 

Rochester (Summer, 1929). 
Emery Roe Hayhurst, Ph.D., M.D., Professor of Hygiene, Ohio State University 

(Summer, 1929). 
William Barnard Sharp, Ph.D., M.D., Professor of Bacteriology and Preventive 

Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Texas (Summer, 1929). 
Abel Wolman, B.S.E., Lecturer on Sanitary Engineering, Johns Hopkins University 

(Summer, 1929). 

FELLOWS, 1929-30 
Winston Harris Tucker, S.M., Lowenstein Fellow. 
Katherine Elizabeth Cox, A.B., Logan Fellow. 
Robert Barton Dienst, A.M. 
Norman Edwin Gibbons, A.M. 

INTRODUCTORY 

THE BACHELOR'S DEGREE 
On admission to the Senior Colleges, each student specializing in the Department 
will arrange, in consultation with the Departmental Counselor, a program of approxi- 
mately 12 majors to be taken in the Department or in the Department and related 
departments, in addition to work completed in the Junior Colleges. 



56 THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO 

HIGHER DEGREES 
A dissertation must be submitted as part of the requirement for the degrees of 
Doctor of Philosophy and Master of Science. The work on which this dissertation is 
based may be done in any of the fields represented in the Department, such as Public 
Health, Bacteriology, Parasitology, or Immunology. For detailed statement concerning 
University requirements for higher degrees, see Handbook of the Graduate Schools. 

THE MASTER OF SCIENCE DEGREE 

Departmental prerequisites. — A dissertation and 8 majors of graduate work are re- 
quired. The majors must be selected with the approval of the Chairman of the Depart- 
ment. 

THE DOCTOR OP PHILOSOPHY DEGREE 

Departmental prerequisites. — A dissertation presenting the results of original re- 
search is required. This research must be conducted under the direction of the Depart- 
ment. In addition, courses 301, 315, 320, and 330 must be satisfactorily completed 
together with such other courses offered by this or related departments as may be 
determined in consultation with the Chairman of the Department. 

THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF MEDICINE 

For the degree of Doctor of Medicine the minimum course requirement in the 
Departments of Hygiene and Bacteriology and Pathology consists of three majors in 
these departments. 

Before being recommended for the degree of Doctor of Medicine the student will be 
required to pass an examination to determine that he has secured a reasonable familiar- 
ity with the general principles of Hygiene and Bacteriology and Pathology, irrespective 
of whether this knowledge has been acquired through work in these departments or in 
other departments of the Graduate School of Medicine. Credits for individual majors 
taken in these departments are conditional upon passing the general examination. This 
examination will be given only to students who have completed at least two and one- 
half years of work in medicine, at times to be announced by the departments. 

Students who elect to meet the special requirements for the degree of Doctor of 
Medicine in the Department of Hygiene and Bacteriology must have done advanced 
work in excess of the minimum requirement as stated above, during at least three 
quarters, leading to the preparation of a dissertation acceptable to the Department of 
Hygiene and Bacteriology, and constituting an actual contribution to knowledge. 

DEPARTMENTAL CLUBS 
The Bacteriology Club, the Bacteriology Journal Club, and the Parasitology 
Journal Club are under the direction of members of the Department. Graduate students 
are expected to attend the meetings of the Bacteriology Club. Advanced students in 
the Department are expected to attend the journal clubs in their respective fields. All 
students are invited to attend the Bacteriology Club and the two journal clubs. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

101. Personal Hygiene. — The elements of normal growth, functions, toleration 
imits, physical diagnosis, prodromes of disease conditions, and the essentials of personal 
health maintenance and of corrective therapeutics. For non-medical students. Lectures 
and demonstrations. M. Summer, First Term. Sharp. 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOLS 57 

201. General Bacteriology. — Lectures on the fundamental facts of bacteriology, 
including brief discussions of the industrial and hygienic applications of bacteriology. 
Yeasts and molds and several groups of bacteria are studied in the laboratory. Designed 
for general scientific students. Prerequisite: Chemistry 101, 102, and 103 (or 104 and 
105), and Zoology 103 or equivalent. Mj. Summer, Bayne- Jones; Autumn, Falk: 
Spring, Koser. 

202. The Pathogenic Bacteria. — This course deals with the characteristics of 
pathogenic micro-organisms, with infection and immunity and with specific infectious 
diseases. In the laboratory the student has opportunity to isolate and identify bacteria 
from pathologic material, to study the effect of bacteria and their products on animals, 
and to obtain practice in clinical laboratory methods. Prerequisite: Bacteriology 201; 
for non-medical students, consent of instructor. Mj. Summer, Dack; Autumn, Jordan, 
Dack; Winter, Dack. 

209. School Hygiene. — This course considers the more important problems relating 
to the individual school child and his environment. It includes discussions of posture, 
neuro-muscular co-ordinations, physical defects, and some phases of personal hygiene. 
The heating, lighting, ventilation of schoolhouses, and other facts of the common school 
life are also taken up. Consideration is given to the questions of school programs, school 
recreations, communicable diseases, and first aid. Admission to this course is limited to 
students in the College of Education and to students taking a sequence in Bacteriology. 
Mj. Summer (or M. either Term), Shaughnessy; Winter (see School of Education). 

210. Public Hygiene. — An introductory course dealing with problems of communi- 
ty hygiene such as water supply, sewage disposal, food supply, infant welfare, tubercu- 
losis, insect-borne diseases, etc. The elements of vital statistics are presented. Pre- 
requisite: 9 majors. Mj. Summer, Falk, Lathrop; Autumn, Koser. 

301. Public Health Laboratory Methods. — Diagnosis of diphtheria, typhoid fever, 
and rabies; Wasserman test, etc. Prerequisite: Bacteriology 202. Limited to 15. Mj. 
Summer, Winter, Spring, Verder. 

304. Bacteriology of Water Supplies. — Mj. [Not given in 1929-30.] 

308. Bacteriology of Foods. — Bacteriology of the commoner food products; funda- 
mental relationships of bacteria, yeasts, and molds to food preservation and food spoil- 
age; food poisoning. Prerequisite: Bacteriology 202. Mj. Winter, Koser. 

315. Immunity in Relation to Preventive Medicine. — Historical and current views 
on the nature and mechanisms of immunity; methods of artificially producing immunity, 
the use of antitoxic and other sera in the treatment of disease; the use of antibodies in 
identification of bacteria and in the diagnosis of diseased conditions. Prerequisite:. 
Bacteriology 301. Mj. Summer, Winter, Falk. 

320. Parasitology. — Designed to give a general survey of our knowledge of the 
parasites of man. It consists of three approximately equal parts dealing with (1) insects 
of medical importance, (2) helminthology, and (3) protozoology. Particular stress is 
laid upon the diagnostic and public-health aspects of those diseases which are caused 
by animal parasites or are carried by insects. Prerequisite: Consent of the Department 
and Zoology 103. Class is limited to 15. Mj. Summer, Autumn, Taliaferro. 

330. Vital Statistics and Epidemiology. — Mj. [Not given in 1929-30.] 

332. Epidemiology. — This course aims to give a general view of the occurrence of 
infectious diseases in nature and the influences of age, sex, season, and environment. 
Methods of epidemiological investigation, the recording of contagious-disease data in 
health-department practice and the evaluation of control measures are discussed. Case 
histories of actual epidemics are given the students for study and discussion. Prerequi- 
site: Bacteriology 202 and 210. Mj. Summer, Spring, Pope. 

370. Advanced Bacteriology, Parasitology, Immunology, and Public Health. — This 
course is open to a limited number of qualified students and to graduates in medicine 
who wish to prepare for research or to obtain special training in some of the branches 
of public health work. The facilities of the University and of local health agencies are 
available for work in the laboratory, field inspection and sanitation, vital statistics, 
public health administration, etc. Prerequisite: Bacteriology 301 or equivalent. Mj. 
each Quarter, hours to be arranged, Jordan, Taliaferro, Falk, Koser, Bayne- Jones, 
Hayhurst, Wolman, Dack, Verder. 



58 THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO 

375. Public Health Problems.— Mj. [Not given in 1929-30.] 

376. Industrial Hygiene. — Prerequisite: Bacteriology 210. M. Summer, First 
Term, Hayhurst. 

377. Public Health Engineering. — Prerequisite: Bacteriology 210. M. Summer, 
Second Term, Wolman. 

401. Sanitary Surveys. — A limited number of advanced students may register with 
the Head of the Department for the sanitary survey of some selected city or town, the 
work to cover a detailed study of vital statistics, water supply, milk supply, food supply, 
health administration, and other factors. Registration for this course after consultation 
only. May be taken out of residence by special permission. Mj. each Quarter, Jordan. 

405. Problems in Theoretical Bacteriology and Immunology. — A Seminar course 
dealing with fundamental problems in the analysis of the physical and chemical proper- 
ties of bacteria and their products; of the dynamics of metabolism, disinfection, infec- 
tion, serum reactions, and immunity. Prerequisite: Bacteriology 301 and 315. Mj. 
Spring, Falk. 

410. Research (Masters' Dissertations). — Mj. or DMj. each Quarter, hours to be 
arranged, Taliaferro, Falk, Koser. 

420. Research (Doctors' Dissertations). — Mj. or DMj. each Quarter, hours to be 
arranged, Jordan, Taliaferro, Falk, Koser. 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOLS 



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60 THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO 

THE DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE 

OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

Russell Morse Wilder, Chairman of the Department of Medicine. 

Albert Baird Hastings, Ph.D., Professor of Biochemistry. 

Paul Chesley Hodges, Ph.D., M.D., Professor of Roentgenology. 

Franklin Chambers McLean, Ph.D., M.D., Professor of Medicine. 

Oswald Hope Robertson, M.D., Professor of Medicine. 

Russell Morse Wilder, Ph.D., M.D., Professor of Medicine. 

Joseph Almarin Capps, A.M., M.D., Clinical Professor of Medicine. 

Joseph Leggett Miller, M.D., Clinical Professor of Medicine. 

Friedrich Hiller, M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 

Samuel William Becker, M.D., Assistant Professor of Dermatology. 

Charles Stilwell Capp, A.M., M.D., Assistant Professor of Roentgenology. 

Alfred Edward Koehler, Ph.D., M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 

Louis Leiter, Ph.D., M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 

Charles Phillip Miller, S.M., M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 

Walter Lincoln Palmer, Ph.D., M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 

Robert Gustav Bloch, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 

Emmet Blackburn Bay, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine. 

William Ernest Cary, Ph.D., M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine. 

Roy Richard Grinker, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Neurology. 

Harry Lee Huber, Ph.D., M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine. 

Marie Ortmayer, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine. 

Stewart B. Sniffen, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychiatry. 

Lotta Jean Bogert, Ph.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

Marg arete Meta Kunde, Ph.D., M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

Alfred Larson, Ph.D., M.D., Instructor in Medicine; Resident Physician, Edward 

Sanatorium. 
Eloise Parsons, Ph.D., M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

Knute Axel Reuter, Ph.D., M.D., Instructor in Medicine; Resident Physician. 
Earl Bradford Ritchie, M.D., Instructor in Dermatology. 
Henry Lenzen Schmitz, Ph.D., M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 
John Murray Steele, M.D., Instructor in Medicine; Associate Resident Physician, 

Edward Sanatorium. 
Willis Eugene Gouwens, Ph.D., M.D., Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 
Beatrice Lovett, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 
George E. Miller, Ph.D., M.D., Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 
Paul Armour Rosborough, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 
Ruth Elaine Taylor, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 
Lillian S. Eichelberger, Ph.D., Research Associate in Medicine. 
Bertha Kaplan, S.M., Research Associate in Medicine. 
James B. Graeser, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 
Ruth Herrick, M.D., Assistant in Dermatology. 
Robert E. Lyons, M.D., Assistant in Medicine; Assistant Resident. 
T. W. Martin, M.D., Assistant in Medicine; Assistant Resident. 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOLS 61 

Alfonso Fararo Massaro, M.D., Assistant in Roentgenology; Assistant Resident. 

T. D. Rivers, M.D., Assistant in Medicine; Assistant Resident. 

Martin E. Rudolph, M.D., Assistant in Medicine; Assistant Resident. 

Hillyer Rudisill, Jr., M.D., Assistant in Roentgenology; Assistant Resident. 

Evan Shute, M.D., Assistant in Medicine; Assistant Resident. 

Harold Tannenholz, M.D., Assistant in Dermatology; Assistant Resident. 

Lucille Ruth Grant, M.D., Clinical Assistant in Medicine. 

Arthur Stenn, M.D., Clinical Assistant in Medicine. 

Earl S. Carey, Ph.D., M.D., Research Assistant in Medicine. 

James E. Davis, M.A., Research Assistant in Medicine. 

Kathleen Muir, M.D., Research Assistant in Dermatology. 

William Westbrook Redfern, S.B., Sc.D., Research Assistant in Medicine 

Edward Eugene Terrell, S.B., Research Assistant in Medicine. 

Eleanor Blish, S.B., Laboratory Assistant in Medicine. 

Mary Agnes Cornwell, A.B., Laboratory Assistant in Medicine. 

Helen Howard, Laboratory Assistant in Medicine. 

Evelyn White Stevens, S.M., Laboratory Assistant in Neurology. 

Helen Van Sant, Laboratory Assistant in Medicine. 

FELLOWS, 1929-30 

Lotta Jean Bogert, Ph.D., Lasker Fellow. 

James E. Davis, M.A., Lasker Fellow. 

Lillian Eichelberger, Ph.D., Lasker Fellow. 

James B. Graeser, M.D., Douglas Smith Fellow. 

Lucille Ruth Grant, M.D., Douglas Smith Fellow. 

Roy Richard Grinker, M.D., Douglas Smith Fellow. 

Bertha Kaplan, M.S., Douglas Smith Fellow. 

Alfred E. Koehler, Ph.D., M.D., Lasker Fellow. 

Margarete Meta Kunde, Ph.D., M.D., Douglas Smith Fellow. 

William Westbrook Redfern, S.B., Sc.D., Douglas Smith Fellow. 

Henry L. Schmitz, Ph.D., M.D., Lasker Fellow. 

Edward E. Terrell, S.B., Douglas Smith Fellow. 

Frank Billings, Sc.D., M.D., Professor Emeritus of Medicine. 

INTRODUCTORY 

The Department of Medicine as at present organized represents the fields of 
General Medicine, Pediatrics, Neurology, Dermatology, and Roentgenology. Instruc- 
tion in all of these fields, except Pediatrics, will be offered during the academic year 
1929-30. 

The Department of Medicine occupies the Frank Billings Medical Clinic, which 
by virtue of its intimate physical relationship with the Albert Merritt Billings Hospital 
and the Max Epstein Clinic concentrates all of the activities of the department in a 
single architectural unit. 

The Albert Merritt Billings Hospital provides approximately one hundred beds 
for the Department of Medicine, while the Max Epstein Clinic provides space and 
facilities for the examination and treatment of out-patients. The laboratories of the 
department are equipped for the methods now usually employed in the investigation 



62 THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO 

of disease, either in the study of the individual patient or the advancement of knowl- 
edge concerning disease. They include laboratories of Physiology, Bacteriology, Serol- 
ogy, and Chemistry. 

PLAN OF INSTRUCTION 

The Department of Medicine aims to present the subject matter of medicine, 
that is to say of disease, as a branch of human knowledge. It recognizes that instruction 
in this subject may be sought by the student for diverse reasons and with diverse ends 
in view. For this reason the courses have been planned with the view of presenting the 
range and variety of the subject matter of disease, in so far as personnel and facilities 
permit, rather than of attempting to compress the whole of medicine into a standardized 
curriculum. Various orderly sequences are possible to meet various needs, and the De- 
partment will undertake to advise students in the selection and arrangement of courses 
when such advice is desired. A series of courses is suggested which will enable the 
average student studying for the degree of doctor of medicine to cover the ground 
required by the Department of Medicine in six majors. 

Each student whose work in the Department warrants it will be assigned laboratory 
space according to his requirements, and he will have access to this at all hours of the 
day or night. He will also have access to equipment which is provided for common 
use, as centrifuges, balances, sterilizers, incubator rooms, refrigerators, and hoods. It 
is the intention to provide each student with the facilities of a medical laboratory and 
to put these facilities freely at his disposal. 

Students whose work brings them in contact with patients will be required to wear 
clean white coats, of a design specified by the Department, whenever they enter parts 
of the Clinic to which patients are admitted. 

RESEARCH 

In addition to assuming the task of teaching medicine, the Department places 
emphasis on its study of advancing knowledge with respect to disease. While the prima- 
ry efforts of the Department in investigation will be directed toward the study of disease 
processes, it is recognized that strict adherence to this imposes limits which are too 
narrow, and that investigations in the Department may touch on all branches of science 
contributory to medicine. Students may pursue investigations under the direction of 
members of the Department, or if properly qualified, may work independently, and 
such facilities as the Department has at its disposal will be offered to research students 
and independent investigators. 

For the purpose of carrying on its clinical and teaching duties and its research the 
Department is loosely subdivided into divisions, each with a chief who will have primary 
responsibility for dissertations based on studies pursued within his division and under 
his direction. 

FELLOWSHIPS 

A number of fellowships, open to suitably qualified students, are available for re- 
search in the Department of Medicine. These fellowships, which as a rule provide a 
stipend and the expenses of research, are awarded to graduate students (with or with- 
out the M.D. degree) on recommendation of the Chairman of the Department, to whom 
application for further information should be made. 

VISITORS 
All formal exercises in the Department of Medicine are open to physicians without 
charge for a period not to exceed one week unless by special arrangement. Visitors 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOLS 63 

should register at the office of the Department, where they will be given visitors' cards 
admitting them to the Medical Clinic, and where they will also be furnished with such 
information as they require. 

THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF SCIENCE 1 
The Department of Medicine will recommend students for the degree of Master of 

Science when the following requirements have been met: 

1.- Compliance with the regulations of the Graduate Faculty with regard to the 

technical requirements for the degree. 

2. Presentation of a satisfactory dissertation embodying the results of original re- 
search in General Medicine, Pediatrics, Neurology, Dermatology, or Roentgenology. 

3. Successful completion of the Master's examination, designed to test not merely 
knowledge of particular courses but competency of training and equipment. 

4. Certification by the appropriate departments of the candidate's reading knowl- 
edge of French and German. 

5. Successful completion of a course of study as approved by the Department, to 
include eight majors in advance of 300, of which three must be in advance of 350. 

THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 1 

The Department of Medicine will recommend students for the degree of Doctor of 
Philosophy when the following requirements have been met: 

1. Compliance with the regulations of the Graduate Faculty with regard to the 
technical requirements for the degree. 

2. Presentation of a dissertation embodying the results of original research in 
General Medicine, Pediatrics, Neurology, Dermatology, or Roentgenology. This must 
form an actual contribution to existing knowledge and be worthy of publication in a 
journal devoted to the medical sciences. Simple case studies or reports will not be con- 
sidered as coming within this definition. 

3. Successful completion of the Doctor's examination. The candidate will be exam- 
ined not only as to depth of knowledge in the particular field treated by his dissertation, 
but also as to his breadth of knowledge in general medicine and the medical science 
as a whole. 

4. Certification by the appropriate departments of the candidate's reading knowl- 
edge of both French and German. 

5. Successful completion of a course of study as approved by the Department. 

THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF MEDICINE 

The Department of Medicine will certify students as having received the approval 
of the Department for the degree of Doctor of Medicine in case Medicine is not the 
major subject when the following requirements have been met: 

1 . Satisfactory completion of not fewer than six majors of graduate grade (including 
advanced standing for work done elsewhere) in Medicine, Neurology, Pediatrics, 
Dermatology, and Roentgenology, of which not less than three majors shall have been 
in this Department. 

2. Satisfactory completion of a written, practical, and oral examination covering 
the entire field of General Medicine and Pediatrics, Neurology, Dermatology, and 
Roentgenology. This examination will cover the field to which courses 303, 307, 323, 
326, 328, and 331, and courses in Pediatrics are devoted. 

1 For general university requirements for higher degrees, see the Handbook of the Graduate Schools. 



64 THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO 

When Medicine is the major subject the foregoing requirements must be supple- 
mented by additional work in the Department leading to a dissertation which must have 
been presented to and accepted by the Department. In the examination when medicine 
is the major subject the student will be examined for depth of knowledge in any branch 
of medicine which he may select, as well as for breadth of knowledge in general medicine. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
I. GENERAL MEDICINE 

201. Survey of Medicine. — An introductory and elementary course, designed 
primarily for non-medical students who wish to acquire an intelligent understanding of 
the achievements and limitations of modern medicine as a basis for forming an inde- 
pendent judgment as to its uses and value to the individual and to society. This course 
will include a brief survey of the history of the development of medical thought and 
practice, a consideration of the present status of medicine as a science and as an art, 
and of the directions in which it is tending. Patients will be demonstrated, particularly 
to show the results of the application of the experimental method to problems of diag- 
nosis and treatment. Open to Senior College and graduate students. |Mj. Spring. 
McLean. 

*303. Clinical Clerkships. — Includes fMj. credit in Therapeutics and Medicine 
307, 325, Surgery 302, and Ob. Gyn. 000. Limited to eight students in any quarter. 
Thirty hours a week. 3Mjs. Students may not register for more than |Mj. additional. 
Prerequisite: Pathology 302. Summer, Autumn, Winter, Spring. Wilder, Robert- 
son, and Others. 

*307. Clinical Lectures. — This course supplements 303. Summer, miscellaneous 
disease, neurology; Autumn, diseases of heart, arteries, kidneys, and blood; Winter, 
diseases of lungs, gastrointestinal tract, and infectious diseases; Spring, diseases of 
metabolism, neurology. Recommended for three consecutive quarters. |Mj. No credit 
allowed for students taking 303. Wilder, Robertson, and Others. 

310. Allergic Phenomena. — A lecture course on the theoretical and clinical 
aspects of the allergys. Autumn, |Mj. Huber. 

*323. Clerkship in Out-Patient Department: General Medicine. — Limited to 
eight students in any quarter. Prerequisite: 3 Majors of 303 or equivalent. Mj. (4 
days); l^Mjs. (6 days weekly). At least one major recommended. Wilder and 
Others. 

325. Ward Visits: General Medicine. — Limited to eight students. Prerequisite: 
Pathology 302. Wilder and Others. 

343. Diet Therapy. — Lectures and conferences. |Mj. 

351-60. Advanced Systematic General Medicine. — These courses cover more in- 
tensively the ground surveyed in 307. The student will be expected to become familiar 
with some of the technical methods in use in the study of disease and, if more than £Mj. 
is desired, to take some part in investigations in progress. Three lecture periods weekly, 
|Mj.; with additional time spent in laboratory or clinical investigations, 1, 2, or 3 Mjs. 
Prerequisite: 3Mjs. of 303 or equivalent. 

351. Infectious Diseases. — Winter. Miller, Robertson. 

352. Diseases of the Blood and Blood-Forming Organs. — Spring. Robertson. 
355. Tuberculosis. — Limited to six students. Periodic visits to Edward Sana- 
torium. |Mj. Summer, Autumn, Spring, Bloch. 

357. Diseases of the Heart and Vascular System. — Autumn. Bay. 

358. Diseases of Metabolism and Deficiency Diseases. — Autumn, Wilder, 

KOEHLER. 

* Courses that are preceded by an asterisk are offered each quarter of the year, except 326 which 
is not offered in the summer. Courses 303 and 307 are designed to provide a general survey of Medicine 
as well as training in physical and laboratory diagnosis and Therapeutics. It is desirable that Course 303 
be taken in one of the quarters of the third year and that course 307 be taken throughout the third year. 

Courses 323, 326, 328, and 331 are supplementary. It is desirable to take them simultaneously in 
one of the quarters of the fourth year. 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOLS 65 

359. Diseases of the Kidneys. — Winter, Leiter. 

360. Diseases of the Digestive System. — Spring. Palmer. 

390. Physico-chemical Methods Applied to Medicine. — Blood as a physico- 
chemical system under normal and pathological conditions and the principles and 
technique of gas analysis as applied to liquids and gases, including electrometric and 
colorimetric methods. §Mj. or Mj. Spring, Hastings. 

401-3. Research in General Medicine. — Open to qualified students by arrange- 
ment with the chief of the division concerned. 1, 2, or 3 Mjs. a Quarter. 

401. Chemical Division. — Wilder. 

402. Physiological Division. — Hastings. 

403. Biological Division. — Robertson. 
411-20. Seminars in Medicine. — 

411. Seminar in Medicine. — Weekly reports and conferences. Open to all stu- 
dents registered in the department. No credit. W., 4:30, F., 3:30. 

413. Seminar in Infectious Diseases. — A seminar course in which the student 
makes an exhaustive study of one or more of the infectious diseases from the historical 
and developmental viewpoints. ^Mj. Autumn, Winter. By arrangement only. Limited 
to four students. Robertson. 

414. Medical-Surgical Conferences. — Weekly joint ward visits with members of 
the Department of Surgery, with discussion of clinical problems of common interest. 
Open to students on invitation only. One hour a week. No credit. 

415. Clinical-Pathological Conferences. — Weekly conferences with the Depart- 
ment of Pathology and the clinical departments, on correlation of clinical study of 
cases with morbid anatomy. Open to students on invitation only. No credit. F.,4:30. 

416. Clinical-Bacteriological Conferences. — Weekly joint ward visits with mem- 
bers of the Department of Hygiene and Bacteriology with discussion of clinical problems 
of common interest. Open to students on invitation only. One hour a week. No credit. 

420. Clinical-Physiological Conferences. — Weekly joint ward visits with members 
of the Physiological Group, with discussion of clinical problems of physiological interest. 
Open to students on invitation only. One hour a week. No credit. 

II. DERMATOLOGY 

*328. Clerkship in the Out-Patient Department: Dermatology. — Limited to 
eight students. Prerequisite: 3Mjs. of 303 or equivalent. Summer, Autumn, Winter, 
Spring. £Mj. or Mj. Recommended for fMj., Tu, Sat. Becker. 

330. Clinical Lectures on Diseases of the Nervous System. — At Oak Forest 
Infirmary. §Mj., 2 hours a week, Becker. 

345. Therapy of Syphilis. — Limited to small groups of fourth year students. 
Supervised participation in intravenous and intragluteal administration of drugs, and 
lumbar puncture. Fever therapy. Therapy as modified by all types of syphilitic proc- 
esses, contraindications to and complications of therapy, with management thereof. By 
arrangement, 3 hours a week, ^Mj. Becker. 

362. Advanced Dermatology. — Instruction in dermatologic histopathology, bac- 
teriology, parasitology and immunology. Lectures and demonstrations; study of der- 
matoses grouped according to their predominating lesions. By arrangement only. 1, 2, 
or 3 Mjs., Becker. 

405. Research in Dermatology. — Open to qualified students by arrangement with 
Chief of Division. 1, 2, or 3 Mjs. per Quarter, Becker. 

418. Seminar in Dermatology. — Weekly conferences on investigation in progress 
and on current literature and on subjects of current interest. Open to students on 
invitation only. One hour a week. No credit. 

III. DISEASES OF THE NERVOUS SYSTEM (NEUROLOGY) 

*331. Clerkship in the Out-Patient Department: Neurology. — Limited to eight 
students. Prerequisite: 3Mjs. of 303 or equivalent. Summer, Autumn, Winter, Spring. 
|Mj. or lMj. Recommended for |Mj. M., Th. Hiller, Grinker. 

* See note on p. 64. 



66 THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO 

332. Ward Visits: Neurology. — Prerequisite: consent of instructor. |Mj. 

363. Advanced Neurology. — 10, 20, or 30 hours a week. 1, 2, or 3 Mjs. 

364. Neuropathology. — Laboratory exercises and conferences on the general and 
special pathology of the central nervous system. |Mj. each Quarter. Two hours a 
week. General Neuropathology, Grinker. Special Neuropathology, Hiller. 

406. Research in Diseases of the Nervous System. — Open to qualified students by 
arrangement with the Chief of the Division. 1, 2, or 3 Mjs. a Quarter. Hiller. 

419. Seminar in Neurology. — Weekly conferences on investigation in progress and 
on current literature and subjects of current interest. Open to students on invitation 
only. One hour a week. No credit. Grinker. 

IV. ROENTGENOLOGY 

*326. Clinical Roentgenology. — Limited to eight students. Prerequisite: 3Mjs. 
of 303 or equivalent. Autumn, Winter, Spring. ^Mj. Hodges, Capp. 

365. Roentgenology. — The Division of Roentgenology co-operating with the De- 
partment of Physics offers during the summer quarter an intensive course in the physics 
of X-ray, operation and care of X-ray apparatus, and the principles of X-ray diagnosis 
and therapy. Open to graduate physicians and to medical students by arrangement 
only. Daily, 30 hours a week, Second Term, Summer Quarter, 3M. Hodges, with the 
co-operation of Compton, Bearden, and Others. 

366. Advanced Roentgenology. — Theoretical and practical work in Division of 
Roentgenology. 1, 2, or 3 Mjs. By arrangement only. Hodges. 

404. Research in Roentgenology. — Open to qualified students by arrangement. 
1, 2, or 3 Mjs. Hodges. 

* See note on p. 64. 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOLS 



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THE MEDICAL SCHOOLS 69 

THE DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY 

OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

Dallas B. Phemister, Chairman of the Department of Surgery. 

I. GENERAL SURGERY 
Dallas B. Phemister, M.D., Professor of Surgery. 
George Morris Curtis, Ph.D., M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 
Lester Reynold Dragstedt, Ph.D., M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 
Percival Bailey, Ph.D., M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 
Edmund Andrews, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 
Charles Brenton Huggins, S.B., M.D., Assistant Professor of Surgery. 
Edward Lyon Compere, S.M., M.D., Clinical Instructor in Surgery. 
Paul C. Bucy, S.M., M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 
Hilger P. Jenkins, S.B., M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
Alexander Brunschwig, S.M., M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
J. C. Ellis, S.B., M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
W. E. Adams, S.B., M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
Huberta M. Livingstone, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
A. 0. Rewbridge, S.B., M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

II. OPHTHALMOLOGY 
Edward Vail Lapham Brown, S.B., M.D., Professor of Ophthalmology. 
Peter Clemens Kronfeld, M.D., Associate Professor of Ophthalmology. 
Louis Bothman, S.B., M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology. 
Dewey Katz, S.B., M.D., Instructor in Ophthalmology. 
S. V. Abraham, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Ophthalmology. 

III. OTOLARYNGOLOGY 
John R. Lindsay, S.B., M.D., Assistant Professor of Otolaryngology. 
Gordon H. Scott, M.D., CM., Instructor in Otolaryngology. 
T. E. Walsh, A.B., Assistant in Otolaryngology. 

INTRODUCTORY 

Instruction is given in the form of introductory courses, amphitheater clinics, clerk- 
ships in the hospital and out-patient department, and advanced work in the special 
fields of general surgery and in the surgical specialties. Opportunities are offered quali- 
fied students for research work. 

THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF MEDICINE 
All candidates for the degree of Doctor of Medicine are required to complete a 
minimum of five majors in general surgery and the surgical specialties and to pass a 
general examination in general surgery, otolaryngology, and ophthalmology. Examina- 
tions will be offered at the end of each quarter. Candidates who offer surgery as their 
major subject are required to pass an oral examination in the field of their special work. 
A number of interneships are available in the surgical clinic for the fifth or interne year. 



70 THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO 

THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY IN SURGERY 

The degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Surgery will be recommended only for stu- 
dents who have completed the work required for the degree of Doctor of Medicine, 
and who have submitted a thesis embodying original research approved by the Depart- 
ment of Surgery and of a magnitude equivalent to that required for the degree of Doctor 
of Philosophy in the Graduate Schools of the University. 

FELLOWSHIPS 
Fellowships from The Douglas Smith Foundation and The Frank G. Logan Fellow- 
ship Fund may be awarded to properly qualified candidates for research work in the 
Department of Surgery. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
I. GENERAL SURGERY 

301. Principles of Surgery. — An introductory course in general surgery consisting 
of four one-hour lecture, laboratory, and clinical demonstration periods weekly. The 
course will cover wounds, hemorrhage, surgical infections, asepsis and antisepsis. 
Regional surgical diseases will be briefly considered. |Mj. M., Tu., Th., F., 1:30, 
Autumn, Spring, Curtis, Bailey, Dragstedt, Huggins. 

302. Amphitheater Clinic. — M. F., 12:00-1:00 each Quarter. Autumn, mainly 
diseases of the abdomen; Winter, mainly diseases of the head, neck, and thorax; Spring, 
mainly diseases of the extremities; Summer, miscellaneous. Includes practical work in 
anesthesia, in assisting at operations, and the study of the surgical pathology of tissues 
removed at daily operations. jMj. included in Medicine 303 and Surgery 303. 

303. Clinical Clerkship in Hospital. — The student works as a member of a team 
responsible for the care of patients and for the investigation of disease. Daily each 
Quarter. Rounds at 8 : 00 a.m. Work throughout day and night according to demand. 
Includes % major credit in Therapeutics. Includes Medicine 307, Surgery 302, Ob- 
stetrics and Gynecology 000. Prerequisite: Pathology 302. 3£Mjs. Phemister, 
Curtis, Dragstedt, Bailey, Andrews, Huggins. 

304. Clerkship in OPD. — Prerequisite: Surgery 303 or Medicine 303. Under 
supervision the student participates in diagnosis and treatment of conditions presented 
by ambulatory patients. Mj. M. to Sat. Members of the Department. 

307. Ward Visits with Clinical Clerks. — Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Mj. 
Each Quarter. Phemister and Staff. 

350. Surgical Anatomy and Operative Surgery on Cadavers and Dogs. — Two two- 
hour periods weekly. Prerequisite: Surgery 303. |Mj. Winter, Summer, Curtis, 
Dragstedt, Huggins. 

356. Advanced Work in Various Fields of General Surgery. — Prerequisite: con- 
sent of instructor. Each Quarter £Mj. to 2Mjs. Phemister, Curtis, Dragstedt, 
Andrews, Bailey. 

402. Research in Surgery. — Each Quarter Mj. 3Mjs. Phemister, Curtis, 
Dragstedt, Andrews, Bailey. 

411. Seminar. — Weekly. No credit. Phemister. 

II. OPHTHALMOLOGY 

311. Clinical Ophthalmology. — A combined external disease and ophthalmoscopic 
course given in the dispensary, wards, operating rooms, and laboratory. This includes 
training in the use of instruments, in history writing, determination of central and 
peripheral vision, intraocular tension, description of external and fundus diseases, 
diagnosis and therapeutics. The laboratory exercises consist of study and drawing of 
prepared specimens of the more important eye diseases. Laboratory, 5-15 hours weekly. 
Each Quarter. Mj. M., W., F., 8:00-12:00. Katz. 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOLS 71 

315. Clinical Clerkship in Ophthalmology. — The student works as a member of a 
team responsible for the care of patients and investigation of disease in the dispensary 
and hospital. 9:00-5:00 daily, 3Mjs. Each Quarter, Brown, Bothman, Kronfeld, 
Katz. 

353. Special Pathology of the Eye. — Designed for ophthalmologists. This course 
consists of three parts: (1) lectures on the pathogenesis of eye diseases; (2) study of 
pathological specimens illustrating principles; and (3) the correlation of clinical and 
post-mortem findings. 4 hours weekly. Each Quarter. £Mj. Brown. 

355. Medical Ophthalmology. — Designed to meet the needs of consultants 
especially in the fields of internal medicine, neurology, and pediatrics. To be given 
mainly in the wards of the hospital. 4 hours weekly. ^Mj. Bothman, Katz. 

403. Research in Ophthalmology. — This may be undertaken on morphologic prob- 
lems under Professor Brown, on physiological and biochemical problems under Dr. 
Bothman, and in physiological optics under Dr. Kronfeld. 1-3 Mjs. Each Quarter. 

412. Seminar. — Monthly. Brown. 

III. OTOLARYNGOLOGY 

321. Clinical Otolaryngology. — A clinical and lecture course designed to give all 
of the work required in otolaryngology. The course includes a review of the anatomy and 
physiology of the ear, nose, and throat; methods of examination, lectures on diseases of 
the ear, nose, and throat; and study of patients. Tu., Th., Sat., 8:00-12:00. OPD, 
lMj. Each Quarter. Lindsay and Staff. 

404. Research in Otolaryngology. — Mj. to 3Mjs. Lindsay. 



72 



THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO 





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74 THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO 



THE DEPARTMENT OF PATHOLOGY 

RUSH MEDICAL COLLEGE 

OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

Ludvig Hektoen, M.D., Sc.D., LL.D., Professor of Pathology. 
Edwin Raymond LeCount, M.D., Professor and Chairman of the Department of 
Pathology. 

George Howitt Weaver, M.D., Professor of Pathology. 
Edwin Frederick Hirsch, Ph.D., M.D., Assistant Professor of Pathology. 
Carl Wesley Apfelbach, M.D., Assistant Professor of Pathology; Resident Patholo- 
gist, Presbyterian Hospital. 
George J. Rukstinat, S.B., M.D., Instructor in Pathology. 
Celestin B. Semerak, M.D., Assistant in Pathology. 
Harold Goldthorpe, Ph.D., Assistant in Pathology. 
G. Bernice Rhodes, A.M., Assistant in Pathology. 
Clyde Reynolds Jensen, M.D., Assistant in Pathology. 
Leroy William Yolton, M.A., Fellow in Pathology. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

12. Special Pathologic Anatomy and Histology. — Limited to twenty-five students. 
Practical instruction is given in the methods of making post-mortem examinations and 
of recording the results. The student studies and describes the gross and microscopic 
appearance of diseased organs and tissue. Bacteriologic and chemical methods and 
experiments are employed whenever indicated and the clinical relations (pathologic 
physiology) of the morbid conditions are emphasized. Prerequisite: courses Pathology 
1 and 2 and at least one quarter of clinical work. Daily, 2:00-4:00, and autopsies. 
144 hours. 1.2Mjs. each quarter; also daily, 9 : 00-1 1 : 00, Autumn and Winter, LeCount 
and Assistants. 

12A. A Continuation of Course 12 for Students Taking Additional Work Along the 
Same Lines. — Hours to be arranged; two hours daily. 144 hours. 1.2MJ. Autumn, 
Winter, and Spring, LeCount and Assistants. 

13. The Histology and Diagnosis of Tumors. — Prerequisite: Pathology 201 and 
202. 8:00-10:00. 72 hours. Mj. Autumn, LeCount. 

14. Infection and Immunity. — A lecture course. Autumn, Second Term; W., Sat., 
8:00. 12 hours. .2Mj. Hektoen and Assistants. 

17. Advanced Laboratory Work and Research in Pathology. — Open to a limited 
number of specially qualified students and graduates in medicine. Hours arranged for 
each student. Credit given based on time and quality of work. Throughout the year. 
Hektoen and LeCount. 

18. Pathology Conferences at Rush Medical College or Presbyterian Hospital. — 
S. 1 1 : 00-1 : 00; at Cook County Hospital, Th. , 1 1 : 00-1 : 00. Throughout the year. Open 
to all students. No credit. 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOLS 75 

THE DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE 

RUSH MEDICAL COLLEGE 
OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

Rollin Turner Woodyatt, Chairman of the Department of Medicine. 



James Bryan Herrick, A.M., M.D., Professor Emeritus of Medicine. 

Frank Billings, Sc.D., M.D., Professor Emeritus of Medicine. 

John Milton Dodson, A.M., M.D., Professor Emeritus of Medicine. 

John Ritter, M.D., Professor Emeritus of Medicine. 

Samuel Robert Slaymaker, M.D., Clinical Professor of Medicine. 

Rollin Turner Woodyatt, S.B., M.D., Clinical Professor of Medicine. 

Theodore Tieken, Ph.B., M.D. (Ingals), 1 Clinical Professor of Medicine. 

Wilber E. Post, M.D., Clinical Professor of Medicine. 

Ernest Edward Irons, M.D., Ph.D., Clinical Professor of Medicine. 

Ralph Crissman Brown, M.D., Clinical Professor of Medicine. 

Ralph Waldo Webster, M.D., Ph.D. (Medical Jurisprudence), Clinical Professor of 
Medicine. 

George Frederick Dick, M.D., Sc.D., Clinical Professor of Medicine. 

Frederick Tice, M.D., Clinical Professor of Medicine. 

Arthur R. Elliott, M.D., Clinical Professor of Medicine. 

Bernard Fantus, S.M., M.D. (Therapeutics), Associate Clinical Professor of Medi- 
cine. 

Donald Putnam Abbott, M.D., Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine. 

Solomon Strouse, M.D., Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine. 

Lee Connel Gatewood, A.M., M.D., Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine. 

Ludwig Mannheimer Loeb, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine. 

Leon Bloch, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine. 

Arthur F. Byfield, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine. 

James Richard Greer, M.D., Ph.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine. 

Homer King Nicoll, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine. 

George Howell Coleman, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine. 

Walter Wile Hamburger, S.M., M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine. 

Morris Fishbein, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine. 

Clarence James McMullen, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine. 

Disraeli William Kobak, M.D., F.R.C.R. (London), Assistant Clinical Professor of 
Medicine (Physiotherapy). 

William Alexander Thomas, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine. 

Carl 0. Rinder, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine. 

1 The Ingals Professorship of Therepeutics was founded in 1898 by the late Dr. Ephraim Ingals, by 
a gift to Rush Medical College of $25,000 for the promotion of higher education and the advancement of 
medical science. Dr. Ingals was professor of materia medica and medical jurisprudence in Rush Medical 
College from 1859 to 1871, and was a member of the Board of Trustees and treasurer of the College for 
many years. 



16 THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO 

Kamil Schulhof, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine. 

Harry J. Isaacs, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine. 

Yale Norman Levinson, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine. 

Frank Brazzil Kelly, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine. 

Frank Amos Chapman, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine. 

Francis Leo Foran, S.M., M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine. 

Ralph W. Trimmer, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine. 

George Oliver Solem, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine. 

Emil George Vrtiak, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine. 

Grant Harrison Laing, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine. 

LeRoy Hendrick Sloan, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine. 

Howard Martin Sheaff, Ph.D., M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine and 

Dane Billings Fellow. 
Edward Julius Stieglitz, S.M., M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine. 
Harry Lee Huber, Ph.D., M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine. 
Frederick Olaf Fredrickson, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine. 
Harry Eugene Kelly, A.M., Lecturer on Medicine (Medical Jurisprudence). 
Asher F. Sippy, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 
Abraham B. Rimmerman, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 
Mabel Marie Matthtes, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 
Stephen Pantelis Anthony, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 
William George Hibbs, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 
Faris Franklin Chesley, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 
Arthur Ralph Colwell, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 
James Bryan Eyerly, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 
Will Ferson Lyon, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 
Thomas Gervase Walsh, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 
George E. Miller, Ph.D., M.D., Clinical Instructor in Medicine (Materia Medica and 

Toxicology). 
Earl Alfred Zaus, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 
Margaret Howard Austin, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 
Joseph Allegretti, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 
Ross Stanley Lang, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 
Meyer R. Lichtenstein, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 
Evans W. Pernokis, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 
Irving Treiger, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 
Alva A. Knight, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 
Ralph Lee Harris, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 
Max Peter Gethner, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 
Charles Melville Bacon, M.D., Clinical Associate in Medicine. 
Ethel Mildred Davis, M.D., Clinical Associate in Medicine. 
Eugene Fagan Traut, M.D., Clinical Associate in Medicine. 
James Lisle Williams, A.M., M.D., Clinical Associate in Medicine. 
Maude Hall Winnett, M.D., Clinical Associate in Medicine. 
Jay McKinley Garner, M.D., Clinical Associate in Medicine. 
John Jacob Hesser, M.D., Clinical Associate in Medicine. 
Edwin P. Jordan, M.D., Clinical Associate in Medicine. 
Arthur Sophus Juul Peterson, M.D., Clinical Associate in Medicine. 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOLS 77 

Abraham M. Serby, M.D., Clinical Associate in Medicine. 

Howard Wakefield, M.D., Clinical Associate in Medicine. 

Fred A. Ball, M.D., Clinical Associate in Medicine. 

Maurice Simkin, M.D., Clinical Associate in Medicine. 

William Simkin, M.D., Clinical Associate in Medicine. 

Arthur J. Atkinson, M.D., Clinical Associate in Medicine. 

Anders J. Weigen, M.D., Clinical Associate in Medicine. 

Clayton J. Lundy, M.D., Clinical Associate in Medicine. 

Leo K. Campbell, M.D., Clinical Associate in Medicine. 

Paul S. Rhoads, M.D., Clinical Associate in Medicine. 

George C. Turner, M.D., Clinical Assistant in Medicine. 

Arnold L. Lieberman, M.D., Clinical Assistant in Medicine. 

Joseph Taymor, M.D., Clinical Assistant in Medicine. 

Charles A. Siler, M.D., Clinical Assistant in Medicine. 

Benjamin H. Hilkovitch, M.D., Clinical Assistant in Medicine. 

George F. O'Brien, M.D., Clinical Assistant in Medicine. 

Samuel A. Leader, M.D., Clinical Assistant in Medicine. 

Meyer J. Steinberg, M.D., Clinical Assistant in Medicine. 

Jacob J. Baratz, M.D., Clinical Assistant in Medicine. 

John Sherman Ashby, M.S., M.D., Clinical Assistant in Medicine. 

Esther Frankel, M.D., Clinical Assistant in Medicine (Physiotherapy). 

Harry Friedman, M.D., Clinical Assistant in Medicine. 

Lawrence L. McLellan, M.D., Clinical Assistant in Medicine. 

INTRODUCTORY 

In this department instruction is given in the topics usually comprised under the 
terms Internal Medicine, Neurology, Materia Medica, Therapeutics, Toxicology, and 
Medical Jurisprudence. Each student is required to complete 7 majors in the Depart- 
ment of Medicine of which at least .8 major must be in Nervous and Mental Diseases 
and 2 majors in Materia Medica, Therapeutics, and Toxicology. The courses specifi- 
cally required are, in Medicine proper, 0, 2, 5, 6, 50, and 61; in Nervous and Mental 
Diseases, courses 22 or 22 A, and either 3D or 21. .3Mj. of course 6 is credited to 
Nervous and Mental Diseases. 

In addition to courses in Therapeutics dealing with the use of drugs in the treat- 
ment of disease, the student is given practical instruction in Therapeutics during his 
clinical clerkship in the Presbyterian and other hospitals where he follows the course of 
the patient and observes the results of treatment. 

Courses in clinical medicine dealing specifically with Therapeutics (for example, 23) 
or in part with Therapeutics (course 50, .6Mj. credit) may be applied on the required 
credit in Materia Medica and Therapeutics. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
INTERNAL MEDICINE 

JUNIOR COLLEGE 

0. Practice of Medicine. — A conference and recitation course on the essentials 
of the practice of medicine designed to afford a general survey of the more important 
diseases and conditions in preparation for the clinical courses. Limited to 30 students 
in each section. 36 hours. M., W., F.,8:00. .6Mj. Autumn and Spring, Kelly, Rinder, 
Trimmer, Solem, Sloan, Levinson, Laing, Chapman, and Chesley. 



78 THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO 

OA. Practice of Medicine. — A continuation of course 0. M., W., F., 8:00, Winter 
and Summer. 

2. Physical Examination. — A conference and practical course on the methods of 
physical exploration, chiefly of the normal body. Sections a, b, c, d, e, M., Th., 9:00- 
11:00; Sections/, g, h, i,j, W., Sat., 9:00-11:00. All sections will meet on Saturday, 
8:00-9:00. 60 hours. .5Mj. Autumn and Spring, Gatewood and Others. 

5. Laboratory Diagnosis. — A laboratory course in the chemical microscopic, and 
bacteriologic examination of blood, urine, sputum, gastric contents, feces, secretions, 
exudates, etc., and their pathologic and clinical significance, special attention being 
given to the acquisition of an accurate technique. Sec. a, M., Th., 9:00-11:00; sec. c, 
W., Sat., 9:00-11:00. 48 hours. .4Mj. Autumn and Spring, Pernokis and Others. 

6. A Clinical Course. — In the Central Free Dispensary each quarter. In the de- 
partments of Internal Medicine, and of Nervous arid Mental Diseases, conducted by 
members of the Department. Prerequisite: Physical and Laboratory Diagnosis. In 
sections, one quarter for each section. Daily, 9:00-11:00. 144 hours. 1.2Mjs., .3Mj. 
of which is in Nervous and Mental Diseases. 

SENIOR YEAR 

3A. Clinic and Conference Course at the Cook County Hospital. — Topics: Au- 
tumn: gastro-intestinal diseases; Winter: general medicine; Spring: General medicine. 
Limited to 10 students. Tu., F., 11:00-1:00. 48 hours. .4Mj. 

3B. Clinic and Conference Course at the Cook County Hospital. — Topics: Au- 
tumn: respiratory diseases; Spring: cardio- vascular and renal diseases. Limited to 10 
students. M., Th., 9:00-11:00. 48 hours. .4Mj. 

3C. Clinic and Conference Course at the Cook County Hospital. — Topic : General 
medicine. Winter and Spring. Limited to 10 students. W., Sat., 9:00-11 : 00. 48 hours. 
.4Mj. Tice. 

3E. Clinic and Conference Course at the Cook County Hospital. — Topics: Spring, 
heart and respiratory diseases. Limited to 10 students. M., Th., 9:00-11 : 00. 48 hours. 
.4Mj. L. C. Gatewood. 

3F. Clinic and Conference Course at the Cook County Hospital. — Topic: General 
medicine with special reference to heart. Autumn and Spring. Limited to 10 students. 
Tu., F., 9:00-11:00. 48 hours. .4Mj. McMullen. 

3H. Clinic and Conference Course at the Cook County Hospital. — Topics: Au- 
tumn: infectious diseases; Spring: diseases of blood and ductless glands. Limited to 10 
students. Tu., F., 2:00-4:00. 48 hours. .4Mj. Byfield. 

3 J. Clinic and Conference Course at the Cook County Hospital. — Topics: Summer 
and Winter: Respiratory Diseases. Limited to 10 students. Tu., F., 11:00-1:00. 48 
hours. .4Mj. Loeb. 

3R. Clinic and Conference Course at the Cook County Hospital. — Topic: Au- 
tumn and Spring: respiratory diseases with special reference to tuberculosis. W., S., 
9:00-11:00. Limited to 10 students. 48 hours. .4Mj. Isaacs. 

3W. Clinic and Conference Course at the Michael Reese Dispensary. — Topic: 
Diseases of the gastro-intestinal tract. Limited to 6 students. Tu., F., 11:00-1:00. 48 
hours. .4Mj. Each Quarter. Bloch. 

6B. Clinical Course at the Central Free Dispensary. — Topic : Diabetes. Limited to 
2 students. Prerequisite: Course 6. Each quarter, Th., 9:00-11:00. .2Mj. Woodyatt 
and Campbell. 

6C. Clinical Course at the Central Free Dispensary. — Topic: Diseases of the heart 
and blood vessels. Limited to 6 students. Prerequisites: same as for 6B. Each quarter. 
.4Mj. M., Th., 9:00-11:00. Slaymaker, Anthony, and Gethner. Tu., F., Chesley 
and Hesser; W. and S., Laing, Austin, and Zaus. 

6D. Clinical Course at the Central Free Dispensary. — Topic: Diseases of the 
alimentary tract. Limited to four students in each section. Prerequisites : same as for 
6B. Each quarter, sec. a, M., Th., 9:00-11:00. .4Mj. Abbott and Fredrickson; sec. 
b, Tu., F., 9:00-11:00, L. C. Gatewood, Trimmer, and Ashby; sec. c, W., S., 9:00- 
11:00, Eyerly and Harris. 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOLS 79 

6E. Clinical Course at the Central Free Dispensary. — Topic: Diseases of the 
kidney. Limited to four students. Prerequisite: same as for 6B. Each quarter, W., 
S., 9:00-11:00. .4Mj. Stieglitz and Lundy. 

6F. Clinical Course at the Central Free Dispensary. — Topic: "Respiratory Con- 
ditions." Special emphasis on Asthma and allergic phenomena. Limited to 2 students 
in sections. Prerequisite same as for course 6B. Each quarter, Section b, Tu. and F., 
9:00-11:00. .4Mj. Foran; sec. c, W. and S., 9:00-11:00, Huber. 

8. Clinical and Conference Course. — Topic: Diseases of chest with special refer- 
ence to the technique of physical diagnosis. Limited to 15 students. Autumn, Tu., F., 
9:00-11:00. (Winter and Spring days to be announced). 48 hrs. .4Mj. Abbott. 

JUNIOR AND SENIOR YEAR 

9. Clinical Medicine. — A clinic and conference course in Medicine, M., Th., 9:00- 
11:00. 48 hours. .4Mj. 

Summer: General Medicine with special reference to diseases of the alimentary 
tract. Abbott. 

Autumn: General Medicine with special reference to diagnosis and therapeutics. 
Post and Associates. 

Winter: General Medicine with special reference to metabolic aspects of disease. 

WOODYATT. 

Spring: General Medicine with special reference to cardio- vascular and renal 
diseases. Post. 

11. Clinical Medicine. — A clinical and conference course in Medicine. Tu., F., 
9:00-11:00. Each course 48 hours. .4Mj. 

Summer: General Medicine with special reference to diseases of the blood, duct- 
less glands, and metabolism. Greer and Rinder. 

Autumn: General Medicine with special reference to diseases of the heart and 
blood vessels. Herrick and Slaymaker. 

Winter: General Medicine with special reference to Infectious Diseases. Diseases 
of the Respiratory Tract and Therapeutics. Irons and Kelly. 

Spring: General Medicine. Kelly. 

13. Clinical Medicine. — A clinical conference course in medicine. W., Sat., 9:00- 
11:00. Each course 48 hours. .4Mj. 

Summer: General Medicine with special reference to gastro-intestinal diseases. 
Eyerly. 

Autumn: General Medicine with special reference to diseases of the alimentary 
tract. Brown. 

Winter: General Medicine with special reference to diseases of the alimentary 
tract. Brown. 

Spring: General Medicine with special reference to diagnosis and therapeutics. 
Abbott. 

23. Therapeutic Clinic. — A medical clinic at the Cook County Hospital, with 
special reference to therapeutics. Autumn and Winter, W., 6:30-8:30 p.m. 24 hours. 
.2Mj. Gatewood. 

24. Clinical Diagnosis and Differential Diagnosis Courses. — Advanced work in 
clinical diagnosis, differential diagnosis, etc. Each quarter, Th., 7:00-9:00, Cook 
County Hospital. .2Mj. . 

25. A Clinical Course in Electrocardiography at Mount Sinai Hospital. — Limited 
to 10 students. 24 hours. .2Mj. Autumn, F., 4:00-6:00; Winter, W., 9:00-11:00, 
Isaacs. 

26. Vascular and Renal Diseases. — Lecture course. Winter, Spring, W., S., 8:00- 
9:00. lMj. Stieglitz. 

27. Industrial Medicine. — A clinical and conference course to illustrate the diseases 
and injuries peculiar to the industries, including preventive medicine. Limited to 12 
students. Tu. and F., 7:00-9:00 p.m. 48 hours. .4Mj. Pernokis, Avery, Peterson, 
and Others. 



80 THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO 

28. Advanced Physical Diagnosis. — A clinical course with special reference to 
methods and technique of physical diagnosis. 48 hrs. .4Mj. Tu., F., 9:00-11:00, 
Autumn, Winter, Spring. 

33. Variola (extra-mural). — A clinical course in variola, at the Chicago Isolation 
Hospital, at intervals as material is afforded. Class limited to 10 each. .2M. Hoyne. 

37. Hematologic Diagnosis (with demonstrations). — Limited to 10 students. Sec. 
a, M., 2:00-4:00; sec. c, W., 2:00-4:00. .2Mj. Autumn, Winter, Spring; Schulhof. 

38. Conference Course on Current Clinical Problems. — 8:00-9:00, 12 hours. 
lMj. Schulhof. 

41. The Technic of Medication. — A lecture and demonstration course on thera- 
peutic management and the administration of medicines, including practice in prescrip- 
tion-writing. .4Mj. Autumn and Spring. Tu., F., 11:00-12:00, Fantus. 

43. Physiotherapy. — A conference and practical course on the methods of physical 
therapy including methods of reconstruction. Each quarter, Tu. and F., 9:00-11:00, 
48 hours. .4Mj. Limited to 10 students. Kobak. 

50. Clinical Clerkship in Presbyterian Hospital. — One month. 9:00-4:00 daily. 
144 hours. 1-1.2 Mjs. The amount of credit will be determined by quality of work 
done on recommendation of the department. Limited to 12 students. Taken in combi- 
nation with similar courses in other departments. The student will work in the wards 
of the hospital under supervision of the staff of the hospital. His work will include 
taking of the history and the examination of the patient, the making of routine labora- 
tory examinations, observation of the course of the disease and study of the thera- 
peutic methods employed. 

50A. Clinical Clerkship in Michael Reese Hospital. — (Same as Course 50.) Limit- 
ed to 8 students. 

50B. Clinical Clerkship in Washington Boulevard Hospital. — (Same as Course 50.) 
Limited to 4 students. 

50C. Clinical Clerkship in St. Luke's Hospital. — (Same as Course 50.) Limited to 
4 students. 

53. Materia Medica and Therapeutics. — A lecture and conference course dealing 
with the physical, chemical, and pharmaceutical properties of medicinal agents, their 
toxicology, and therapeutic application in the treatment of disease. Lectures and con- 
ferences. Spring Quarter. 48 hours. M., W., Th., 8:00-9:00. .6Mj. Tiekin and As- 
sistants. 

53A. Toxicology and Materia Medica. — A lecture, conference, and laboratory 
course dealing with the practical work in toxicology and materia medica. Autumn and 
Spring. Tu., F., 9:00-11:00. 48 hours. .6Mj. McNally and Miller. 

53B. Toxicology. — An advanced conference and laboratory course dealing with 
the physical and chemical properties of the more important poisons, their effects and 
treatment, and their detection. Conferences and laboratory. 60 hours. .8Mj. Hours to 
be arranged. McNally. 

61. Medical Jurisprudence, Hygiene, and Preventive Medicine. — A lecture course 
supplemented by recitations and conferences. Tu., Th., and S., 8:00-9:00. .6Mj. 
Winter, Ralph Webster and Kelly. 

63. Examinations for Life Insurance. — A lecture and conference course on the 
nature and purpose of life insurance, the duties and essential qualifications of the 
examiner for life insurance, etc. 12 hours. W., 5:00-6:00. .2Mj. Winter, Dodson. 

64. Medical Economics. — A lecture course in Medical Economics and Ethics. 6 
hours. Hours to be announced. .lMj. Winter. 

65. General Review of the Clinical Branches. — A conference and recitation course 
affording Senior students an opportunity to review the clinical branches and to co- 
ordinate their knowledge in preparation for examinations for license or for hospital 
interneships and for practice of medicine. In sections limited to 30 students each. 
6 hours per week for each section. Summer, sec. a, M., W., Th., 4:00-6:00; sec. b, Tu., 
W., F., 4:00-6:00. lMj. 

65A. A continuation of course 65. Autumn. lMj. 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOLS 81 

68. Military Medicine. — A course in medicine, hygiene, sanitation, administration, 
and surgery as related to the medical departments of the army, navy, and marine corps. 
Each Quarter, F., Seniors, 1:00-2:00; Juniors, 2:00-3:00. .2Mj. 

Courses for first, second, third, and fourth years are arranged in accordance with 
the program authorized by the Surgeon-General, U.S.A. 

69. Medical History and Medical Writing. — A lecture course on the evolution of 
modern medicine and on the art of medical writing. 12 hours. .2Mj. Tu., 5:00-6:00. 
Autumn Quarter, Fishbein. 

GRADUATE COURSES IN MEDICINE 
A limited number of graduates will be accepted for work in General Medicine. 
For the present the course may be for either one or two years. Applicants must be 
approved by a department Committee. For particulars apply to Clinical Professor 
Rollin T. Woodyatt or to the Dean. 

NERVOUS AND MENTAL DISEASES 

OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

Thor Rothstein, M.D., Clinical Professor of Neurology. 

Peter Bassoe, M.D., Clinical Professor of Neurology. 

Sydney Kuh, M.D., Clinical Professor of Neurology. 

James Cornelius Gill, M.D., Clinical Professor of Neurology. 

George Washington Hall, A.M., M.D., Clinical Professor of Neurology. 

John Favill, M.D., Associate Clinical Professor of Neurology. 

Josephine Estabrook Young, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Neurology. 

Harry Richard Hoffman, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Neurology. 

Loren William Avery, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Neurology. 

Harry G. Hardt, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Neurology. 

Morris Braude, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Neurology. 

Victor E. Gonda, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Neurology. 

Richard Biddle Richter, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Medicine (Nervous Diseases) 

and Daniel R. Brower Fellow. 
David B. Rotman, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Neurology. 
Mary Gritzner Schroeder, M.D., Clinical Associate in Neurology. 
Roland Parks Mackay, M.D., Clinical Assistant in Neurology. 
Yetta Scheftel, M.D., Clinical Assistant in Neurology. 

courses of instruction 

3D. Diseases of the Nervous System. — A clinical and conference course in Cook 
County Hospital. Limited to 15 students. M., Th., 9:00-11:00. 48 hours. .4Mj. Au- 
tumn and Winter, Favill. 

6G. Clinical Course at Central Free Dispensary. — Psychometric Methods and 
Clinical Aspects of Mental Deficiency. Sat., 9:00-11:00. 24 hours. .2Mj. Autumn, 
Winter, and Spring, Rotman. 

19. Clinical Psychiatry. — Demonstration and Conference Course, Psychopathic 
Hospital. Prerequisite: course 22 or 22A. Tu., 4:00-6:00. 24 hours. .2Mj. Limited 
to 10 student?. Autumn and Winter, Kuh. 

19A. Pathology of the Nervous System. — A demonstration, clinical, and conference 
course, including discussion of symptoms depending upon various pathologic changes in 
the nervous system. Prerequisite: one clinical course in Nervous Diseases. W., S., 
9:00-11:00. 24 hours. .4Mj. Autumn and Winter, Rothstein Avery, and Richter. 



82 THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO 

21. Diseases of the Nervous System — A clinical and conference course. Limited 
to 40 students. M., Th., 9:00-11:00. 48 hours. .4Mj. Summer, Hoffman and Rot- 
man; Autumn, Hall; Winter, Gill. Spring, Bassoe and Hoffman. 

22. Psychiatry. — A clinical and conference course at the Cook County Hospital. 
Topic: Insanity. M., 4:00-6:00. 24 hours. ,2Mj. Autumn and Winter, Kuh and 
Braude. 

22A. A Clinical and Conference Course in Psychiatry at the Cook County Psycho- 
pathic Hospital.— Tu., 9:00-11:00. 24 hours. .2Mj. Spring, Hall; Autumn, Gill. 

22B. A Clinical and Conference Course in Psychiatry at Central Free Dispensary. 
— Supplemented by Saturday afternoon visits to Chicago State Hospital and House of 
Correction. 24 hours. .2Mj. W., 2:00-4:00. Summer and Spring, Rotman. 

50. Clinical Clerkship in Presbyterian Hospital. — One month. 9:00-5:00 daily. 
168 hours. l-1.2Mjs. The amount of credit will be determined by quality of work 
done on recommendation of the department. Limited to 4 students. Taken in combi- 
nation with similar courses in other departments. The student will work in the wards 
of the hospital under supervision of the staff of the hospital. His work will include 
the taking of history and the examination of the patient, the making of routine labora- 
tory examinations, observations of the course of the disease, and study of the thera 
peutic methods employed. 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOLS 83 

THE DEPARTMENT OF PEDIATRICS 

RUSH MEDICAL COLLEGE 

OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

Clifford Grosselle Grulee, Chairman of the Department of Pediatrics. 



Clifford Grosselle Grulee, A.M., M.D., LL.D., Clinical Professor of Pediatrics. 

Archibald Hoyne, M.D., Associate Clinical Professor of Pediatrics. 

Arthur Hawley Parmelee, M.D., Associate Clinical Professor of Pediatrics. 

Frank Wesley Allin, A.M., M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Pediatrics. 

Charles Klaus Stulik, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Pediatrics. 

William L. Buhrman, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Pediatrics. 

Eleanor I. Leslie, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Pediatrics. 

Heyworth N. Sanford, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Pediatrics. 

George Alvin Barnett, M.D., Clinical Associate in Pediatrics. 

John Joseph Zavertnik, M.D., Clinical Associate in Pediatrics. 

Craig D. Butler, M.D., Clinical Associate in Pediatrics. 

Florence M. Meader-Rees, M.D., Clinical Assistant in Pediatrics. 

John McDavid, M.D., Clinical Assistant in Pediatrics. 

William B. Raycraft, M.D., Clinical Assistant in Pediatrics. 

Norman T. Welford, M.D., Clinical Assistant in Pediatrics. 

Jennie Kantor-Amtman, M.D., Clinical Assistant in Pediatrics. 

INTRODUCTORY 

A total of 1 major in Pediatrics is required. The courses specifically required are 
1, 4, and 4A, 4B or 4C, and 7 or 50. Course 1 must be taken before, or at the same time 
as, course 7 or 50. It is recommended that special courses in Infant Feeding be taken in 
addition. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

1. The Principles of Pediatrics. — A conference and recitation course comprising 
the anatomy, physiology, and hygiene of infancy and childhood, the dietetics of infancy 
and childhood and the commoner diseases of infancy and childhood. Prerequisite to 
every other course in pediatrics. Limited to 30 students. Autumn, Tu., F., 8:00-9:00, 
Stulik; Winter, Tu., F., 4:00-5:00, Sanford; Spring, Sec. a, Tu., F., 8:00-9:00, 
Buhrman; sec. b, Tu., F., 4:00-5:00, Sanford; Summer, Tu., F., 8:00-9:00, Sanford. 
24 hours. .4Mj. (Courses 1 and 7 may be taken in the same quarter.) 

4. Contagious Diseases. — A conference and recitation course on contagious dis- 
eases. No limit in attendance. .lMj. Autumn and Spring, F., 8:00-9:00 a.m., once a 
week for six weeks. Hoyne. 

4A. Clinical Course in Contagious Diseases. — A clinic at the Durand Hospital. 
.lMj. Six sections of 4 students each. One hour a week for one quarter. Sec. a, M., 
8:00-9:00; sec. b, Tu., 8:00-9:00; sec. c, W., 8:00-9:00; sec. d, Th., 8:00-9:00; sec. e, 
F., 8:00-9:00; sec./, Sat., 8:00-9:00, Weaver. 

4B. Clinic in Contagious Diseases. — Clinic in Contagious Department of Cook 
County Hospital. Two hours a week for one term. .lMj. Autumn, Winter, and Spring 
Quarters. Limited to 12 students in each section. Sat., 11:00-1:00, Hoyne. 

4C. Clerkship. — Municipal Hospital, 1 week. 



84 THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO 

7. Dispensary. — A course in the Central Free Dispensary. Sec. a, M., Th., 9:00- 
11 :00, Central Free Dispensary, Butler. Limited to 4 students. Sec. b, Tu., F., 9:00- 
11:00, Central Free Dispensary, Stulik, and Welfare Clinic 20A, Barnett. Limited 
to 10 students. Sec. c, W., S., 9:00-11:00, Central Free Dispensary, Limited to 4 
students. 48 hours. .4Mj. 

12. Pediatric Clinic. — A clinic and conference course. Tu., F.. 9:00-11:00. 48 
hours. AM). Summer, Parmelee; Autumn, Winter, and Spring, Grulee. Each quar- 
ter there will be given two clinical periods in Diseases of the Heart in Children, Stulik; 
one period on Congenital Syphilis, Sanford. 

14. Pediatric Clinic. — A clinic and conference course at the Presbyterian Hospital, 
.4Mj. M., Th., 9:00-11:00. 48 hours. Limited to 15 students. Autumn and Winter, 
Parmelee. 

15. Nutrition Clinic. — A clinical and conference course at the Central Free Dis- 
pensary, Postnatal clinic. Sec. a, M., sec. c, W., sec. d, Th., 9 : 00-11 : 00. 24 hours. Each 
quarter. Leslie. 

15A. Nutrition Clinic. — The feeding and care of children (two to six years of 
age). Th., 9:00-11:00. 24 hours. Each quarter. Limited to 5 students. .2Mj. 

15B. Nutrition Clinic. — The feeding and care of older children (six to sixteen 
years of age). Sat., 9:00-11:00, Tu., 4:00-6:00. 48 hours. Each quarter. Limited to 
5 students. .4Mj. Allin. 

16. Pediatric Clinic at the Cook County Hospital. — A clinic and conference course 
at the Cook County Hospital. Each quarter. Tu., 7:00-9:00 p.m. 24 hours. Autumn, 
Spring, Parmelee; Summer and Winter, Stulik. 

17. Clinic on New-born Infants. — A clinical demonstration course at Cook County 
Hospital dealing with normal new-born infants, the diseases of the new-born, the pre- 
mature infant, and the care and management of the new-born. Autumn, Winter, and 
Spring Quarters. S., 8:00-9:00. Limited to 10 students. .lMj. Parmelee. 

18. Nutrition. — Class in food values. Lecture and laboratory course with practical 
experience in normal and therapeutic diets. W., 4:00-6:00. .lMj. 

20A. Infant Welfare Clinic— Ashland Infant Welfare Station, 1759 West 14th 
Place. First and second terms. Limited to 5 students- Tu., F., 9:00-11:00. 2Mj. 
Barnett. 

50. Clinical Clerkship in Presbyterian Hospital and Central Free Dispensary. — 
One month. 9:00-5 : 00 daily. 168 hours. Limited to 6 students. Taken in combination 
with similar courses in other departments. l-1.2Mjs. Amount of credit will be deter- 
mined by quality of work done on recommendation of the department. 

50A. Clinical Clerkship in Michael Reese Hospital. — (Same as Course 50.) 
Limited to 4 students. 

GRADUATE COURSE IN PEDIATRICS 
A limited number of graduates will be accepted for work in Pediatrics. The course 
will be for two years. Applicants must have had at least one year's interneship in a 
creditable hospital and must be approved by a department Committee. For particulars 
apply to Clinical Professor Clifford G. Grulee. 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOLS 85 

THE DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY 

RUSH MEDICAL COLLEGE 

OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

Arthur Dean Bevan, Chairman of the Department of Surgery. 

William Thomas Belfield, M.D., Professor Emeritus of Surgery (Genito-urinary) . 
Arthur Dean Bevan, A.M., M.D., Nicholas Senn Clinical Professor. 1 
Vernon Cyrenius David, M.D., Clinical Professor of Surgery. 
Kellogg Speed, M.D., Clinical Frofessor of Surgery. 

Robert Harry Herbst, M.D., Clinical Professor of Surgery (Genito-urinary). 
Herman Louis Kretschmer, M.D., Clinical Professor of Surgery (Genito-urinary). 
Charles Aubrey Parker, M.D., Associate Clinical Professor of Surgery (Orthopedic). 
Carl Braden Davis, S.B., M.D., Associate Clinical Professor of Surgery. 
Frederick Brown Moorehead, S.M., D.D.S., M.D., Associate Clinical Professor of 

Surgery (Oral and Dental). 
Isabella Coler Herb, M.D., Associate Clinical Professor of Surgery (Anaesthetics). 
Albert Horr Montgomery, M.D., Associate Clinical Professor of Surgery. 
Gatewood Gatewood, A.M., M.D., Associate Clinical Professor of Surgery. 
Edwin Morton Miller, M.D., Associate Clinical Professor of Surgery. 
Cassie Belle Rose, M.D., Associate Clinical Professor of Surgery (Radiology). 
Paul Oliver, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Surgery. 
George Gilbert Davis, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Surgery. 
Edward James Lewis, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Surgery. 
Golder Lewis McWhorter, M.D., Ph.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Surgery. 
David C. Straus, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Surgery. 
Roger Throop Vaughan, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Surgery. 
Elven James Berkheiser, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Surgery (Orthopedic). 
Francis Howe Straus, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Surgery. 
Harry Alvin Oberhelman, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Surgery. 
Mary M. Lyons, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Surgery (Anaesthetics). 
Hugh James Polkey, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Surgery (Genito-urinary). 
George Henry Jackson, Jr., M.D., Nicholas Senn Fellow and Clinical Instructor in 

Surgery. 
Jacob Myers, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Surgery (Orthopedic). 
Merrill H. Killip, D.D.S., Clinical Instructor in Surgery (Oral). 
Howard C. Miller, D.D.S., Clinical Instructor in Surgery (Oral). 
Thomas Cottrell, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Surgery (Genito-urinary). 
Hillier L. Baker, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Surgery. 
Ferdinand A. Seidler, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Surgery (Orthopedic). 
Edward Buckman, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Surgery (Genito-urinary). 
Kay L. Thompson, D.D.S., Clinical Instructor in Surgery (Oral). 
Jay Ireland, M.D., Clinical Associate in Surgery. 
William John Gallagher, M.D., Clinical Associate in Surgery. 

1 The Nicholas Senn Professorship was founded in 1898 by the late Professor Nicholas Senn, with a 
gift to the college of $25,000 for the promotion of higher medical education and the advancement of medical 
science. He was professor of the principles of surgery in Rush Medical College from 1889 to 1891 and 
professor of surgery from 1891 to 1908. 



86 THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO 

Earl Roach McCarthy, M.D., Clinical Associate in Surgery. 

Andrew Joseph Sullivan, M.D., Clinical Associate in Surgery (Genito-urinary). 

Knowlton E. Barber, M.D., Clinical Associate in Surgery (Genito-urinary). 

Willis J. Potts, M.D., Clinical Associate in Surgery. 

Dean L. Rider, M.D., Clinical Associate in Surgery. 

Frank Victor Theis, M.D., Clinical Associate in Surgery. 

Charles Grafton Weller, M.D., Clinical Associate in Surgery (Genito-urinary). 

Roy Herndon Cox, M.D., Clinical Associate in Surgery (Genito-urinary). 

Mark L. Loring, M.D., Thomson-Bevan Fellow in Surgery; Assistant House Surgeon, 

Presbyterian Hospital. 
Joseph H. Chi vers, M.D., Clinical Assistant in Surgery. 
Julius Joseph Mussil, M.D., Clinical Assistant in Surgery. 
Charles N. Pease, M.D., Clinical Assistant in Surgery (Orthopedic). 
Randolph Francis Olmsted, M.D., Clinical Assistant in Surgery. 
Nora B. Brandenburg, M.D., Clinical Assistant in Surgery (Anaesthetist). 
Leo Matthew Czaja, M.D., Clinical Assistant in Surgery. 
Stanley E. Lawton, M.D., Clinical Assistant in Surgery. 
Chester A. Perrodin, M.D., Clinical Assistant in Surgery (Genito-urinary). 
William John Vynalek, M.D., Clinical Assistant in Surgery (Genito-urinar)'). 
Arthur E. Diggs, M.D., Francis A. Hardy Fellow in Surgery; Assistant House Surgeon, 

Presbyterian Hospital. 

INTRODUCTORY 

A total of 5 majors in surgery is required. The following courses are specifically 
required: 1, 2, 3, 5, and 50. In addition, the student should plan his clinical courses 
to include at least one clinic in each of the Regional Divisions. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
I. JUNIOR YEAR 

1. Principles of Surgery and Surgical Pathology. — A conference and laboratory 
course. Sec. a, M., Th., 11:00-1:00, and sees, b and c, M.,Th., 4:00-6:00. 36 hours. 
.5Mj. Autumn and Spring, David, Gatewood, Montgomery, McWhorter, Straus, 
Oberhelman, McCarthy, and Potts. 

2. Principles of Surgery and Surgical Pathology. — A conference and laboratory 
course. 36 hours. .5Mj. Winter, sec. a, M. and Th., 11 :00-l :00; and sees, b and c, M., 
Th., 4:00-6:00. Summer, M. and Th., 11 : 00-1 : 00, David, Gatewood, Montgomery, 
McWhorter, Straus, Oberhelman, McCarthy, and Potts. 

3. Surgical Anatomy and Operative Surgery on the Cadaver. — A demonstration 
and operative course. Sec. a, M., Th., 11:00-1:00; sec. b, Tu., F., 11:00. 48 hours. 
.4Mj. Winter and Spring, Miller, Gatewood, Montgomery, McWhorter, Straus, 
Baker, and Potts. 

4. Genito-urinary Surgery. — A recitation and conference course for Juniors, given 
to the class in sections. 24 hours. .4Mj. Spring, Tu., F., 4:00-5:00, Polkey and 
Buckman. 

5. Clinical Surgery (Central Free Dispensary). — Including bandaging, surgical 
dressings, and surgical appliances. Daily, 11:00-1:00. 48 hours. .4Mj. Each quarter 
throughout the year. Sec. a, M., Th.; sec. b, Tu., F.; sec. c, W., Sat. Each section 
limited to 12 students. Jackson, Ireland, Gallagher, Potts, Lawton, Theis, 
Olmsted, Mussil, and Rider. 

This course may be elected by Junior students after one quarter's residence in the 
clinical years during which other courses in surgery have been taken. 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOLS 87 

14. Orthopedic Surgery. — A clinical course at the Home for Crippled Children, 
1653 Maypole Avenue. .4Mj. Summer, Autumn, Winter, and Spring. 48 hours. Sec. a, 
M., Th., 2:00^:00; sec. b, Tu., F., 2:00-4:00; sec. c, W., Sat., 2:00-4:00, Parker, 
Berkheiser, Myers. 

II. JUNIOR AND SENIOR YEARS 

6. Clinical Surgery. — A clinical and conference course in general surgery, with 
special reference to and examination in the surgery of the abdomen. This course in- 
cludes instruction in the administration of anaesthetics. 11 :00-l :00, M. and Th., Tu. 
and F., 48, 60, or 96 hours. .4, .6, or .8Mj Autumn, Bevan, Davis, and Associates. 

7. Surgical Physiology. — -A conference and demonstration course in physiology and 
biochemistry as applied to clinical surgery. 12 hours. .lMj. Autumn and Spring, Tu., 
12:00-1:00, Straus. 

8. Clinical Surgery. — A clinical and conference course in general surgery, with 
special reference to and examination in the surgery of the head, neck, and thorax. 
This course includes instruction in the administration of anaesthetics. M. and Th., Tu. 
and F., 11:00-1:00. 48, 60, or 96 hours. .4, .6, or .8Mj. Winter, Bevan, David, and 
Associates. 

10. Clinical Surgery. — A clinical and conference course in general surgery, with 
special reference to and examination in surgery of the extremities. This course includes 
instruction in the administration of anaesthetics. M., Tu., Th., and F., 11:00-1:00. 
48, 60, or 96 hours. .4, or .8Mj. Spring, Bevan, Speed, and Associates. 

12. Clinical Surgery. — A clinical and conference course in general surgery. This 
course includes instruction in the administration of anaesthetics. M., Tu., Th., and F., 
11:00-1:00. 48, 60, or 96 hours. .4, .6, or .8Mj. Summer, Bevan, Gatewood, Mont- 
gomery, Miller, and Associates. 

13. Laboratory and research work may be elected by a limited number of students 
in the laboratories of Surgical Pathology, and credit in proportion to the character and 
length of course may be granted, but not to exceed .4Mj. in any one quarter. Ober- 

HELMAN. 

15. Orthopedic Surgery and Clinical Course in Central Free Dispensary. — Tu. 
and F., 11:00-1:00. 48 hours. .4Mj. Autumn, Winter, and Spring, Berkheiser. 

16. Practical Course in Operative Surgery on Animals. — Given to the class in 
sections. Limited to 32 students. Sec. a, M., 11:00-1:00; sec. b, Tu., 11:00-1:00. 24 
hours. .2Mj. Summer and Autumn, Gatewood, Montgomery, Miller, McWhorter, 
Straus, and Baker. 

17. Genito-urinary Diseases (Central Free Dispensary). — A clinical and confer- 
ence course in diseases of the genito-urinary tract. Sec. a, M., Th.; sec. b, Tu., F.; sec. c, 
W., Sat., 4:00-6:00. 48 hours. .4Mj. Summer, Autumn, Winter, and Spring, Herbst, 
Kretschmer, Polkey, Cottrell, Buckman, Sullivan, and Cox. 

18. Clinical Course of the Cook County Hospital. — Topics: Surgery of Neck, and 
Surgery of Gall Bladder, Spleen, and Pancreas, alternating quarters. Class limited to 
10 students. Tu., 11:00-1:00. 24 hours. .2Mj. Autumn, Winter, and Spring, D. C. 
Straus. 

19. Clinical Course at the Cook County Hospital. — Topics: Autumn and Winter: 
Fractures. Tu., 2:00^:00. 24 hours. .2Mj. Speed. 

20. Clinical Course at the Cook County Hospital. — Topic: General Surgery. Class 
limited to 10 students. F., 11:00-1:00. 24 hours. .2Mj. Autumn and Spring, David; 
Summer and Winter, E. J. Lewis. 

21. Clinical Course at the Cook County Hospital (Genito-urinary). — W., 2:00- 
4:00. 24 hours. .2Mj. Summer, Autumn, Winter, and Spring, . 

22. Clinical Course at the Cook County Hospital. — General Surgery. Class limited 
to 20 students. Tu., 7:00-9:00 p.m. 24 hours. Each quarter. Vaughan. 

23. Clinical Course at the Cook County Hospital. — Topic: General Surgery, with 
Special Reference to Spinal Column and Cord. W., 4:00-6:00. 24 hours. .2Mj. Au- 
tumn, Winter, G. G. Davis. 



88 THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO 

24. Clinical Course at the Cook County Hospital. — Topic: General Surgery with 
Special Reference to — Autumn: Head and Neck; Winter: Extremities; Spring: Abdo- 
men. Class limited to 20 students. W., 7:00-9:00 p.m. 24 hours. .2Mj. Oliver. 

25. Orthopedic Clinic at the Cook County Hospital. — Clinical course, with special 
reference to the orthopedic affections of adults. M., 2:00-4:00. 24 hours. .2Mj. Each 
quarter. Parker. 

26. Clinical Course at the Cook County Hospital. — Topic: General Surgery. Class 
limited to 10 students. Autumn and Spring, Th., 7:00-9:00 p.m. 24 hours. .2Mj. 
E. J. Lewis. 

27. Clinical Course at the Cook County Hospital. — Class limited to 20 students. 
Autumn, Winter, Spring, W., 11:00-1:00. 24 hours. .2Mj. Vaughan. 

28. Clinical Course at the Cook County Hospital. — Class limited to 20 students. 
24 hours. Autumn, Winter, Spring, M., 7:00-9:00 p.m. .2Mj. Miller. 

29. Operative Surgery for Postgraduates. — On dogs, surgery of the abdomen. 
On the cadaver, surgery of the head, neck, thorax, and extremities. Four weeks, be- 
ginning July 1 and August 1. M., W., F., 4:00-6:00. Other days or months by special 
arrangement. 4 or 8 students. McWhorter. 

30. Anaesthetics. — A conference and demonstration course on the administration 
of anaesthetics. Sat., 2:00-3:00. .lMj. Autumn and Spring, Second Term, Herb. 

33. Roentgenology. — A conference and demonstration course on the use of the 
X-ray in diagnosis and treatment, and on the general principles of radiographic tech- 
nique. Limited to 25 students. W., 2:00-4:00. .2Mj. Autumn, Winter, and Spring, 
First Term, Rose. 

34. Genito-urinary Surgery. — A clinical and conference course in diseases of the 
genito-urinary tract. W., 11:00-1:00. 24 hours. .2Mj. Autumn, Herbst and 
Kretschmer. 

50. Clinical Clerkship in Presbyterian Hospital. — One month. 9:00-4:00 daily. 
168 hours. l-1.3Mjs. The amount of credit will be determined by quality of work 
done on recommendation of the department. Limited to 12 students. Taken in combi- 
nation with similar courses in other departments. The student will work in the wards 
of the hospital under supervision of the staff of the hospital. His work will include 
taking of the history and the examination of the patient, the making of routine labora- 
tory examinations, observation of the course of the disease and of such operations as 
may be necessary, and study of other therapeutic methods employed. 

50A. Clinical Clerkship in Michael Reese Hospital. — (Same as Course 50.) Limit- 
ed to 6 students. 

50B. Clinical Clerkship in Washington Boulevard Hospital. — (Same as Course 50.) 
Limited to 4 students. 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOLS 89 



THE DEPARTMENT OF OBSTETRICS 
AND GYNECOLOGY 

RUSH MEDICAL COLLEGE 

OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

Noble Sproat Heaney, Chairman of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

John Clarence Webster M.D., F.R.C.P. (Edin.), Sc.D., LL.D., Professor Emeritus 
of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

Noble Sproat Heaney, A.B., M.D., Clinical Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

Carey Culbertson, A.B., M.D., Associate Clinical Professor of Obstetrics and Gyne- 
cology. 

Joseph Louis Baer, S.M., M.D., Associate Clinical Professor of Obstetrics and Gyne- 
cology. 

Aaron Elias Kanter, S.M., M.D., Associate Clinical Professor of Obstetrics and 
Gynecology. 

Paul Christopher Fox, S.B., M.D., Clinical Instructor in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

C. Fiske Jones, S.B., M.D., Clinical Instructor in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

George Fielding Hibbert, S.B., M.D., Clinical Instructor in Obstetrics and Gyne- 
cology. 

Gerritt Cotts, S.B., M.D., Clinical Instructor in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

Edward Dudley Allen, S.B., M.D., Clinical Instructor in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

Carl Philip Bauer, S.B., M.D., Clinical Instructor in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

Alexander Garegin Gabrielianz, M.D., Clinical Associate in Obstetrics and Gyne- 
cology. 

Howard Jean Kolloway, S.B., M.D., Clinical Associate in Obstetrics and Gyne- 
cology. 

Dorothy Edwards, S.B., M.D., Clinical Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

Ellis Schweid, M.D., Clinical Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

Carl Thompson Stephan, M.D., Clinical Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

G. Howard Irwin, M.D., Clinical Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

Alice McNeal, M.D., Clinical Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology (Anaesthetics) . 

INTRODUCTORY 

The subjects of Obstetrics and Gynecology are taught in the Junior and Senior 
years in recitation, and conference courses in Dispensary and Hospital clinics, and in 
the conduct of labor in the homes of patients. The total requirement is 3 majors, at 
least 2 majors of which must be taken in obstetric courses and .6 major in Gynecology. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

JUNIOR YEAR 

1. Conference and Demonstration Course in Obstetrics and Gynecology. — The 
female pelvis and genitalia, puberty and menstruation, anatomy, physiology, the 
diagnosis of pregnancy, management of normal pregnancy, physiology and clinical 
course of normal labor, and the puerperium, mechanism in vertex presentation. Mech- 
anism in face, brow, pelvic, and shoulder presentations, the new-born child, multiple 
pregnancy, obstetric operations and manipulations. Limited to 35 students in each 
section. Autumn and Spring, W., S., 11:00-1:00. .6Mj. Autumn, Baer, Fox, and 
Bauer; Spring, Htbbert. 



90 THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO 

2. Conference and Demonstration Course in Obstetrics. — Induced termination of 
pregnancy, forceps, version, operations for enlarging the pelvic diameters, caesarean 
section, embryotomy, manikin demonstrations. Pathology of pregnancy, the toxe- 
mias, ectopic gestation, premature expulsion and diseases of ovum, pathology of labor, 
anomalies of expellent forces, soft passages, bony pelvis and fetus, the hemorrhages, 
injuries of birth canal, prolapse of cord, pathology of peurperium, diseases and abnor- 
malities, sepsis. Prerequisite: course 1. Winter and Summer. W., S., 11:00-1:00, or 
Tu., F., 4:00-6:00. .6Mj. Winter, Baer, Fox, Cotts, Allen, Bauer, and GabriEl- 
ianz; Summer, Hibbert and Bauer. 

3. Conference Course in Gynecology. — Anatomy, gross and histological of the 
internal and external genitalia. Menstruation and its disorders. History-taking. Symp- 
toms in gynecology. Methods of examination. Anomalies of the genital tract. Mal- 
positions of the uterus. Acute and chronic infections of the internal and external 
genitalia. New growths of the uterus, tubes, and ovaries. 12 hours. .4Mj. Gynecology. 
Autumn, M., Th., 12:00-1:00, Kanter; Winter, M., Th., 12:00-1:00, Allen; Spring, 
Tu., F., 4:00-5:00, Baer; Summer, M., Th., 11:00-12:00, Bauer. 

5. Clinical Obstetrics. — In the maternity department of the Presbyterian Hospital, 
Chicago Lying-in Dispensary, Central Free Dispensary, and Michael Reese Hospital. 
Attendance upon cases of confinement in various hospitals and at the homes of patients 
is required of each student before graduation. Each student will be summoned to cases 
at the time of delivery and will attend the patients during and after delivery under 
supervision. Clinical records must be kept by students and certificates obtained. 
Prerequisite: courses 1, 2, and 3. .4Mj. Throughout the year. Heaney, Kanter, and 
Jones; Nurses: Mabel W. Hubbard and Ellen Pehrson. 

6. Conference and Demonstration Course. — A gross and microscopic study of the 
female genitalia, both normal and pathologic, including the changes found in men- 
struation and in pregnancy. Limited to 15 students. Each quarter, W., Sat., 11:00- 
1:00. 48 hours. .4Mj. (Obstetrics .2Mj.; Gynecology .2). Culbertson, Kanter, Fox, 
Jones, and Allen. 

8. Dispensary Clinics. — Conferences in practical gynecology. Prerequisite: course 
1 or 6. Limited to 6 in each section. 24 hours. .4M., each term throughout the year. 
Sec. a, M., Th., 11:00-1:00, Fox, Bauer, and Hodes; sec. b, Tu., F., 11:00-1:00, 
Jones, Allen, and Cotts; sec. c, W., S., 11:00-1:00, Hibbert, Gabrielianz, and 
Schweid. 

SENIOR YEAR 

9. Clinic. — Gynecology and Obstetrics. Prerequisite: course 1 or 6. 48 hours. 
.4Mj. (Obstetrics .2Mj.; Gynecology .2). Each quarter throughout the year. W., Sat., 
11:00-1:00. Heaney and Kanter. 

10. Clinical Course at the Cook County Hospital. — A clinical course in Gynecology, 
Limited to 15 students. Tu., F., 11:00-1:00. 24 hours. .4Mj. Gynecology. Autumn. 
Winter, and Spring, Culbertson. 

10A. Clinical Course at the Cook County Hospital. — A clinical course in Gyne- 
cology. Limited to 15 students. M., Th., 11:00-1:00. 24 hours. .4Mj. Gynecology. 
Autumn and Spring, Kanter. 

11. Special Laboratory Work. — For a limited number of students selected by the 
Department staff. 

50. Clinical Clerkship in Presbyterian Hospital.— One month. 9:00-4:00 daily. 
168 hours. l-1.2Mjs. The amount of credit will be determined by quality of work 
done on recommendation of the Department. Limited to 4 students. Taken in combina- 
tion with similar courses in other departments. The student will work in the wards 
of the hospital under supervision of the staff of the hospital. His work will include 
the taking of history and the examination of the patient, the making of routine labora- 
tory examinations, observation of the course of the disease and of such operations as 
may be necessary, and study of other therapeutic methods employed. 

50A. Clinical Clerkship in Michael Reese Hospital. — (Same as Course 50.) Limit- 
ed to 4 students 

50B. Clinical Clerkship in Washington Boulevard Hospital. — (Same as Course 50.) 
Limited to 4 students. 

50C. Clinical Clerkship in St. Luke's Hospital. — (Same as Course 50.) Limited to 
4 students. 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOLS 91 



THE DEPARTMENT OF LARYNGOLOGY 
AND OTOLOGY 

RUSH MEDICAL COLLEGE 

OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

George Elmer Shambaugh, Chairman of the Department of Laryngology and 
Otology. 

George Elmer Shambaugh, Ph.B., M.D., Clinical Professor of Laryngology and 

Otology. 
George Abraham Torrison, A.B., M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Laryngology 

and Otology. 
Elmer Lawton Kenyon, A.B., M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Laryngology and 

Otology. 
Robert Sonnenschein, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Laryngology and 

Otolbgy. 
Thomas Williams Lewis, S.B., M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Laryngology and 

Otology. 
Daniel Bernard Hayden, A.M., M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Laryngology 

and Otology. 
Edwin McGinnis, A.B., M.D., Clinical Instructor in Laryngology and Otology. 
Arthur Churchill Strong, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Laryngology and Otology. 
Elmer William Hagens, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Laryngology and Otology and 

Stanton Abeles Friedberg Fellow. 
Richard W. Watkins, S.B., M.D., Resident in Laryngology and Otology, Presby- 
terian Hospital; E. Fletcher Ingals Scholarship; Clinical Associate in Laryngology 

and Otology. 
Jesse H. Roth, M.D., Clinical Associate in Laryngology and Otology. 
William J. Yonker, M.D., Clinical Associate in Laryngology and Otology. 
Louis T. Curry, M.D., Clinical Associate in Laryngology and Otology. 
Eduard L. Chainski, M.D., Clinical Associate in Laryngology and Otology. 

INTRODUCTORY 

The work in this department aims to provide for the undergraduate students an 
opportunity to gain some knowledge of the problems with which the specialist in oto- 
laryngology has to deal and to give them such practical training as will fit them to make 
the ordinary examinations necessary in the general study of patients. 

In addition, the Department aims to provide for students who are graduates of 
medicine the first or fundamental year in training preparatory for practice in the 
specialty. For this work we are able to accommodate twelve men, three coming in each 
quarter — January, April, July, and October. The course consists of one year's full time 
work, half of each day being devoted to the clinical study of patients on the West Side, 
the other half to adding to their knowledge of the fundamental sciences necessary in 
the preparation for special practice. The latter is carried on partly in the laboratories 
at the University of Chicago and partly in our own laboratory on the West Side. All of 
this work is on the basis of graduate instruction in which the students do their work for 



92 THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO 

the most part independently under proper supervision and direction. An effort is also 
made to assist these graduate students in some of the more difficult phases of their 
clinical work by means of demonstration courses which are available also as review work 
for men already established in special practice. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

UNDERGRADUATE WORK 

A total of lMj. is required in this Department. Course 1 is prerequisite for course 2. 

1. Nose, Throat, and Ear. — Introductory lecture and conference course for Juniors. 
Prerequisite for courses 2 and 3. M., Th., 4:00. ,4Mj. Summer, Nose and Throat, 
McGinnis; Ear, Chainski. Autumn, Nose and Throat, Curry; Ear, Watkins. 
Winter, Nose and Throat, Sonnenschein; Ear, Hagens. Spring, Nose and Throat, 
Hagens; Ear, Watkins. Two hours will be devoted to the defects of Speech by 
Kenyon. 

2. Nose, Throat, and Ear. — Clinical and practical courses in the Dispensary in 
the technique of examination and in the objective study of the normal and the com- 
moner pathological conditions of the nose, throat, and ear; also intubation of the 
larynx; for Juniors and Seniors. Sections limited to 12 students. Each quarter, 2:00- 
4:00. 48 hours. .4Mj. Sec. a, M., Th.; sec. b, Tu., F.; sec. c, W., S. 

3. Clinical Course: Diseases of the Ear, Nose, and Throat. — Prerequisite: Course 
1. M., 2:00-3:00; Th., 2:00-3:00, Ear, nose, and throat. 24 hours. .2Mj. Ear, Sum- 
mer, Autumn, Winter, Spring, Shambaugh, Hayden and Hagens. Nose and throat, 
Summer, McGinnis; Autumn, Lewis; Winter, Sonnenschein; Spring, Torrison. 

4. Student Assistants in the Dispensary. — One student for each section, from 
either the Junior or Senior class, may register each quarter for work as an assistant 
in the Dispensary. Sec. a, M., Th.; sec. b, Tu., F.; sec. c, W., S., 2:00-4:00. 48 hours. 
.4Mj. 

GRADUATE COURSES 1 

A. Preparatory for special practice : 

5. Clinical Assistant in the Central Free Dispensary. One year, each afternoon. 
Twelve services, three beginning each quarter, January, April, July, and October. 

B. Special courses provided for graduate students serving as clinical assistants but open 
also as review work for those already engaged in special practice : 

6. Intubation. — 6 hours. F., 4:00-5:00. Spring Quarter. Torrison. 

7. Speech Defects.— 12 hours. M. and Th., 1:00-2:00. Autumn Quarter. The im- 
portant disorders of speech are considered from the standpoint of the anatomy and 
physiology of speech production including defects of articulation, stammering, the 
aphonias, organic and functional, the difficulties of public speakers and singers, etc. 
Kenyon. 

8. Bronchoscopy and Suspension Laryngoscopy. — 12 hours. Hours arranged with 
Dr. Hagens. 

9. Functional Examination of the Ears.— 12 hours. Th., 1:00-2:00. Winter Quar- 
ter. Sonnenschein. 

10. Surgical Anatomy of the Ear, Nose, and Throat. — For graduate students dur- 
ing their third or fourth quarter. Autumn and Spring, M., F., 4:00-5 : 00, Hayden and 
Watkins. 

11. Special Course in the Normal and Pathological Anatomy of the Internal Ear. — 
Two weeks' full time work. Intended for practicing otologists. Includes study of the 
gross preparations of the ear and microscopic preparations showing development of the 
membranous labyrinth, normal histology of the end organs in the labyrinth, and the 
pathology of the diseases involving the internal ear. 

1 For details see special Bulletin of Courses in Otohgy and Laryngology for Graduate Students in Medi- 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOLS 93 



THE DEPARTMENT OF OPHTHALMOLOGY 

RUSH MEDICAL COLLEGE 

OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

Edward Vail Lapham Brown, Chairman of the Department of Ophthalmology. 



William Hamlin Wilder, A.M., M.D., Professor Emeritus of Ophthalmology. 
Edward Vail Lapham Brown, S.B., M.D., Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology. 
John Bernard Ellis, M.D., Associate Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology. 
Charles Gilchrist Darling, M.D., Associate Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology. 
William George Reeder, M.D., Associate Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology. 
Thomas Dyer Allen, M.D., Associate Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology. 
Earle Bloodgood Fowler, M.D., Associate Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology. 
William Franklin Moncrteff, M.D., Associate Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology. 
Robert von der Heydt, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology. 
Bertha Klein, M.D., Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology. 
Georgiana Dvorak Theobald, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Ophthalmology. 
Herman Porter Davidson, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Ophthalmology. 
James P. Fitzgerald, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Ophthalmology. 
Vernon Mayne Leech, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Ophthalmology. 
Richard Cotter Gamble, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Ophthalmology. 
Alfred Lubbert Van Dellen, M.D., Clinical Associate in Ophthalmology. 
Clarence W. Rainey, M.D., Clinical Assistant in Ophthalmology. 
Glenway W. Nethercut, M.D., Clinical Assistant in Ophthalmology. 
Elmer A. Vorisek, M.D., Clinical Assistant in Ophthalmology. 

INTRODUCTORY 

UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

A total of .8 Mj. in Ophthalmology is required for graduation. 

The work in this Department is arranged so that the student first gets a general 
survey of the subject through lecture and recitation courses. 

In the same quarter, or the following one, through the courses in "practical 
ophthalmology" he is taught the methods of examination of the eye by various tests, 
the necessary manipulations for treatment, and the use of the ophthalmoscope by prac- 
tical exercises on schematic and living eyes. For this work each student must provide 
himself with an ophthalmoscope. 

All this is preliminary and prerequisite to the clinical courses, in which the student 
is given the privilege of examining the cases, of studying the progress of the diseases 
and the effect of the treatment from day to day, and also of witnessing the technique 
of the operations on the eye. These clinics are on the conference plan, and each exhibi- 
tion of cases is followed by a discussion on the etiology, pathology, symptomatology, 
and treatment of the diseases under observation. 

Special courses for small classes on the normal and morbid anatomy, histology, 
and bacteriology of the eye are made particularly instructive by the exhibition of ana- 
tomical preparations and microscopic slides. 



94 THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

1. Diseases of the Eye. — A lecture and recitation course. 24 hours. .4Mj. Sum- 
mer, Tu., F., 5:00, Rainey; Autumn (Seniors), Tu., F., 4:00, Van Dellen, Winter 
(Seniors), Tu., F., 4:00, Davidson; Spring (Juniors), Tu., F., 4:00, Allen. 

2. Practical Ophthalmology. — Limited to six students in each section. Each stu- 
dent must provide himself with an opthalmoscope. 12 hours. .2Mj. Summer, sec. a, 
M., Th., 2:00, Rainey; sec. b, Tu., F., 2:00, Yonker; sec. c, W., 2:00-4:00, Nether- 
cut. Autumn, sec. a, M., Th., 2:00, Klein; sec. b, Tu., F., 2:00, Yonker; sec. c, W., 
2:00-4:00, Nethercut. Winter, sec. a, M., Th., 2:00, Klein; sec. b, Tu., F., 2:00, 
Davidson; sec. c, W., Sat., 2:00, Nethercut. Spring, sec. a, M., Th., 2:00, Klein; 
sec. b, Tu., F., 2:00, Van Dellen; sec. c, W., Sat., 2:00, Nethercut. 

Courses 1 and 2 may be taken in the same quarter, but both are prerequisite to 
all clinical courses. 

3. Clinical Conferences and Lecture Course. — Prerequisite: courses 1 and 2. 24 
hours. .2Mj. Each quarter, each section limited to 15 students. Sec. a, M., Th., 3:00- 
4:00; sec. b, Tu., F., 3:00-4:00; sec. c, W., 2:00-4:00. Summer, sec. a, Fowler; sec. c, 
Allen. Autumn, sec. a, Fowler; sec. b, Leech; sec. c, Allen. Winter, sec. a, Darling; 
sec. b, Fowler; sec. c, Leech. Spring, sec. a, Reeder; sec. b, Leech; sec. c, Rainey. 

4. Clinical Course on the Eye at the Illinois Charitable' Eye and Ear Infirmary. — 
Prerequisite: courses 1 and 2. Limited to 10 students. 24 hours. .2Mj. Each quarter, 
F., 4:00-6:00. (Not given in 1929-30.) 

5. Clinical Courses at the Cook County Hospital. — In these courses special atten- 
tion is given to the relation of the eye to general disease. Prerequisite: courses 1 and 2. 
Each section limited to 10 students. 24 hours. .2Mj. Autumn, Winter, and Spring. 
Sec. a y M., Th., 3:00, Fitzgerald. Sec. c, W., 9:00-11:00, Moncrieff. 

6. Normal and Pathological Anatomy of the Eye. — A course for advanced students 
and practitioners. Limited to 5 students. Autumn and Winter, Illinois Charitable Eye 
and Ear Infirmary, 1 to 3 days each week, Theobald. Hours to be arranged. 24 hours. 
.2Mj. Autumn, Winter, and Spring, Tu., 4:00-6:00, Gamble; Autumn, Winter, and 
Spring, F., 4:00-6:00, Klein. 

7. Special Work for Student Assistants in the Dispensary. — Junior or Senior 
students who have had course 1 may register as follows: 

Monday, Thursday Two students 2 : 00-4 : 00 

Tuesday, Friday Two students 2:00-4:00 

Wednesday, Saturday Two students 2:00-4:00 

This course is the equivalent of courses 2 and 3. 

Similar opportunity is afforded at the Cook County Hospital Out-Patient Clinic 
from 2:00^1:00 by arrangement with Dr. Fitzgerald. 

8. Embryology. — A course of lectures by Reeder. Hours to be arranged. 

9. Interpretation of Fundus Findings. — A course of lectures by Darling. Hours to 
be arranged. 

10. Physiological Optics. — A course of lectures by Leech. 12 hours. .lMj. Au- 
tumn, W., 4:00. 

11. Bacteriology. — A course of demonstrations by Leech. 12 hours. .lMj. Au- 
tumn, F., 4:00. 

12. Refraction. — A lecture and quiz course by Rainey. 24 hours. .2Mj. Summer, 
M., W., Th., S., 2:00. 

13. Perimetry and Campimetry. — A lecture and demonstration course. Davddson. 
12 hours. .lMj. Autumn, Tu., 4:00. 

14. Ocular Muscles. — A lecture, demonstration, and quiz course by Allen. 12 
hours. .lMj. Spring, Tu., 4:00. 

15. Ophthalmic Operations. — A demonstration course in operative technique on 
animals and cadaver. 12 hours. .lMj. Autumn, Th., 4:00, Reeder; Spring, F., 4:00, 
Allen. 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOLS 95 

16. Slit-Lamp and Gullstrand Ophthalmoscope. — A lecture and demonstration 
course. Von der Heydt. Autumn, Winter, and Spring. 12 hours. .lMj. Tu., 3:00- 
4:00. 

17. Research. — Opportunity is given to a limited number of students to pursue 
investigative work. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

Opportunity for graduate work is offered to a limited number of physicians desir- 
ing to fit themselves for the special practice of Ophthalmology. 

The Department can accommodate eight such graduate students, two entering 
each quarter — January, April, July, and October — and the work must be carried on for 
a period of at least one year. 

It will include courses on the fundamental subjects of anatomy, embryology, 
physiology, neurology, and physics as they pertain to the eye, and this work will be 
done in the laboratories of the University of Chicago in the forenoons of the first three 
quarters. An attempt is made to place each postgraduate student, during his last 
quarter, in the office of a member of the staff where one-half of each day is devoted to 
practical office work. 

The afternoons will be spent in the study of clinical subjects and in the practical 
work of the Dispensary, the student engaging in this work under the guidance of the 
instructors. 

Detailed description of the character of these courses is given in a special Bulletin 
which will be mailed on request. 



96 THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO 



THE DEPARTMENT OF DERMATOLOGY 

RUSH MEDICAL COLLEGE 

OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

Oliver Samuel Ormsby, Chairman of the Department of Dermatology. 

Oliver Samuel Ormsby, M.D., Clinical Professor of Dermatology. 

Ernest Lewis McEvven, S.M., M.D., Associate Clinical Professor of Dermatology. 

Edward Allen Oliver, M.D., Associate Clinical Professor of Dermatology. 

James Herbert Mitchell, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Dermatology. 

Clark Wylie Finnerud, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Dermatology. 

John Frank Waugh, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Dermatology. 

Michael Higgins Ebert, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Dermatology. 

Marion Shelley Fink, M.D., Clinical Associate in Dermatology. 

Vernon E. L. Mrazek, M.D., Clinical Assistant in Dermatology. 

Daniel T. Gandy, M.D., Research Fellow in Dermatology (James Nevins Hyde 

Memorial Fund). 
Ruben Nomland, M.D., Fellow in Dermatology (James Nevins Hyde Memorial 

Fund). 

INTRODUCTORY 

A total of 1 Mj. is required in Dermatology — for graduation. Instruction is given 
by clinical teaching in the College, the Dispensary, and the Cook County Hospital by 
recitations and by demonstrations to small classes of clinical, bacteriologic, and patho- 
logic phenomena. 

Instruction in this Department is supplemented by ample use of the large collection 
of dermatological plates, atlases, and photographs, also by the use of the Baretta 
Models. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

1. Dermatology and Syphilis. — A recitation and conference course given to the 
class in sections not exceeding 25. Tu., F., 4:00-5:00. 24 hours. .4Mj. Summer, 
Ebert; Autumn, Mitchell and Fink; Winter, Oliver; Spring, Finnerud. 

2. Clinical Courses. — A clinical course on the subject of dermatology and syphilis. 
The clinic has been conducted in the College for many years and is attended by a large 
number of out-patients of both sexes and all ages. Each quarter throughout the year. 
Tu., F., 2 :00-4:00. 48 hours. .4Mj. Autumn and Spring, Ormsby; Summer, Mitchell; 
Winter, McEwen. 

3. Clinical Course in the Central Free Dispensary. — A clinical course given to the 
class in small sections in the departments of dermatology and syphilis in the Central 
Free Dispensary. The student is here brought in personal contact with patients and 
required to examine and prescribe for them as in private practice. Limited to 10 stu- 
dents in each section. Each term throughout the year, 2:00-4:00. 24 hours. .2Mj. 
Sec. a, M., Th., Autumn and Spring, Waugh; Winter, Mitchell; Summer, Ebert; 
sec. c, W., S., Autumn, Spring, Ebert; Summer, Winter, Finnerud. 

4. Student Assistant in the Dispensary. — Provision is made for three students to 
assist in the Dispensary each quarter, one M. and Th., one Tu. and F., and one W. and 
S. 48 hours. .4Mj. 

4A. Course in Syphilis. — Work as student assistant in the Evening Clinic in the 
Central Free Dispensary. Opportunity is afforded for special training in the methods 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOLS 97 

of diagnosis and treatment of syphilis. Prerequisite: course 1. Limited to 2 students. 
Each quarter, Tu., F., 7:00-9:00. .4Mj. Oliver. 

5. Syphilis. — A clinical and lecture course comprising a general survey of the 
subject of syphilis. F.,4:00. 12 hours. .2Mj. Autumn, Winter, and Spring, McE wen; 
Spring and Summer, Ebert. 

5A. Cook County Hospital Clinics. — A clinic and conference course at the Cook 
County Hospital on diseases of the skin and syphilis. M., 2:00-4:00. .2Mj. Autumn 
and Spring, Oliver; Summer and Winter, Finnerud. 

7. Serology and Therapeutics of Syphilis. — A laboratory course in the technique 
of the Wassermann test of the blood and spinal fluid and in the intravenous and intra- 
muscular injections of arsenical and mercurial preparations. Limited to 6 students. 
First Term, 8:00-10:00, twice weekly; Second Term, 2:00-4:00, twice weekly. ,2Mj. 
Days to be arranged. Autumn, Winter, and Spring, Ebert. 

8. Histopathology and Bacteriology of the Skin. — A practical laboratory course 
arranged for students desiring special instruction in this department. 4 hours weekly, 
Autumn and Spring. Hours to be arranged. Finnerud. 

GRADUATE COURSE IN DERMATOLOGY AND SYPHILIS 
A limited number of graduates will be accepted for work in Dermatology and 
Syphilis. For the present the course may be for either one or two years. Applicants 
must be approved by a department committee. For particulars apply to Clinical Pro- 
fessor Oliver S. Ormsby. 



98 THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO 

FEES AND EXPENSES 

FEES FOR MATRICULATION, TUITION, APPARATUS 
AND DEPOSITS 

1. Matriculation fee. — (a) The matriculation fee is $10.00, and is required of every 
student on entrance to the University. It is payable but once. 

2. Tuition. — (a) The tuition fee in the School of Medicine of the Ogden Graduate 
School of Science is $100.00 per quarter, including laboratory fees. The fee for one, 
two, or four majors is on a proportionate basis, (b) In Rush Medical College the tuition 
fee is $100.00 per quarter. 

(c) The graduation fee is $10.00. 

(d) All fees are due and payable on or before the first day of each quarter. All fees 
are payable to the Cashier. 

Registration is not complete until all University bills are paid. Those who fail to 
meet this obligation within the first five days of the quarter are not regarded as members 
of the University. After the fifth day (second day in Rush Medical College), to secure 
membership in the University, the consent of the Dean and the payment of a fee of 
$5.00 for late registration will be required. 

3. Special fees. A. In the Graduate School of Medicine at the University. Laboratory 
apparatus and supplies. — (a) Students in laboratory courses are required to purchase at 
the office of the Cashier adequate breakage and supply tickets to be deposited as follows : 
for courses in Chemistry, with the Curator of Kent Chemical Laboratory; for courses 
in Physiology, Physiological Chemistry, Botany, Zoology, Anatomy, Pathology, and 
Hygiene and Bacteriology, at the laboratory supply store in Room 25 of the New 
Physiology Building. New tickets must be purchased at the opening of each quarter, 
and a refund of the unused balance on the old tickets can be obtained at that time. In 
courses requiring the use of a microscope, a rental fee, varying with the type of the 
instrument, is charged, if microscopes are rented, (b) A student may procure a skeleton 
from the Osteological Store Room on payment of a deposit of $50.00, or parts of a 
skeleton on payment of special deposits. The deposit will be refunded when the skeleton 
(or part) is returned uninjured. Credit for courses in Gross Anatomy will not be re- 
ported until all material drawn from the Osteological Store Room is returned. The 
necessary textbooks may be purchased at the University of Chicago Bookstore in 
Ellis Hall. 

B. In Rush Medical College. — (1) A compound microscope is required for some 
of the clinical courses. Every student is strongly advised to purchase a good microscope, 
with an immersion lens, in order that he may become familiar with the same instrument 
which he will use after his graduation. Students not possessing a microscope may rent one 
from the College at a cost of $3.50 per quarter. Each student is required to secure, for 
use in the clinical laboratories, a hemacytometer (cost, about $16.00) and a hemo- 
globinometer. (2) A fee of $20.00 is paid for the out-patient obstetrical work. (3) No 
student can be assigned to any college work until his fees are paid. (4) The annual ticket 
for the County Hospital is $5.00, which is procured from the Warden at the Hospital. 

Deposit. — A deposit of $5.00 is required from each student to cover the cost of 
unnecessary damage in the College buildings and of avoidable loss and breakage in 
the laboratories. Deductions will be made from this deposit to cover the cost of articles 
not returned or of damage to College property. Each student will be charged for 
damage or loss for which he is individually responsible and for his pro rata share of 
damage or loss, the responsibility for which cannot be individually located. The deposit 
must be made on entering the College. 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOLS 99 

ROOMS, BOARD, AND GENERAL EXPENSES 
I. AT THE UNIVERSITY 

UNIVERSITY RESIDENCE HALLS 

The University has twelve residence halls for students, seven for women and five 
for men. Rooms in these halls rent for from $40 to $85 a quarter. The rental includes the 
cost of heat, light, and care, except that in Drexel House (a residence hall for women) 
the rooms are cared for by the occupants. Rooms are for the most part single, but a 
few in each Hall may be occupied by two students. Application for rooms should be 
made to the University Cashier, who will, on request, send a diagram of the Halls 
showing prices of rooms. Each room is furnished with study-table, chairs, bookcase, 
dresser, mirror, rug, bedstead, mattress, and bedding, with the exception that in Hitch- 
cock Hall occupants are required to furnish rugs, and in Drexel House occupants fur- 
nish bedding. Towels must be furnished by the students. Rooms may not be subrented, 
nor can exchange or transfer of rooms be made except by permission of the Cashier. 

A University House is organized in each Hall; each House has a Head, appointed 
by the President of the University, and a House Committee, elected by the members; 
also a House Counselor, selected from the Faculties of the University by the members 
of the House. The membership of the House is determined by election, and each House 
is self-governing under the general control of the University. 

All the halls for women have dining-rooms, and all students living in the halls are 
required to take their meals there. Board is $7.00 per week, payable quarterly in 
advance. 

An opportunity to share in co-operative housekeeping and thereby to reduce living 
expenses somewhat is offered at Drexel House, which accommodates sixteen women 
students who share in the preparation of meals and the care of the House. Room rent 
for each student is $42.00 a quarter, and the co-operative plan makes the cost of table 
board considerably less than is possible under other circumstances. Some experience in 
housekeeping and adaptability to group life are necessary. Correspondence with refer- 
ence to rooms in Drexel House should be addressed to the Director of the Housing 
Bureau. 

HOUSING ACCOMMODATIONS — UNIVERSITY NEIGHBORHOOD 

The University of Chicago maintains its Housing Bureau in order to assist students 
in finding the best accommodations obtainable in the University neighborhood. All 
rooms on the approved list have been inspected in accordance with certain standards. 
One month before the opening of each quarter the Housing Bureau will prepare an 
up-to-date statement with regard to housing for that quarter, and this special bulletin 
will be sent to any who request it. 

Householders who list rooms with the Bureau must agree to rent exclusively to 
men or exclusively to women. Married couples may be received in houses renting either 
to men or to women. A reception room for at least two evenings a week must be pro- 
vided for women students. No rooms on small inclosed courts are accepted. Students 
are asked to co-operate with the University by insisting on these requirements even if 
they do not engage their rooms through the Housing Bureau. 

It is advisable for students to reach the University three or four days before the 
opening of the quarter in order that they may become established in satisfactory living 
quarters before University work begins. Renting by mail is unsatisfactory, as students 
should make personal inspection before engaging rooms, and lists of rooms are not sent 
out by mail by the Housing Bureau. 



100 



THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO 



Single furnished rooms off the Quadrangles range in price from $60.00 to $120.00 
a quarter. Furnished rooms for two range in price from $84.00 to $165.00, and as a rule 
there are more double rooms than single rooms available. A room with good outside 
light and air, drop study light, study table, ample closet space, and a comfortable bed 
will probably cost at least $72.00 a quarter. 

Desirable furnished rooms for light housekeeping are rather difficult to find. They 
range in price from $40.00 to $85.00 a month. As a rule these are in old apartments sub- 
divided for this purpose and sometimes lack adequate facilities. Occasionally rooms 
with kitchen privileges may be secured at the regular rates with an additional charge 
of about $12.00 a quarter. 

Furnished houses or apartments of from four to ten rooms vary in price from $75.00 
to $150.00 a month. In the University neighborhood there are some one-, two-, and 
three-room apartments which range in price from $65.00 to $120.00 a month. 

There are very few places where board may be obtained with room. It is customary 
for students to take their meals at the University Commons or at restaurants in the 
neighborhood. The University Commons provides cafeteria service for men at Hutchin- 
son Hall and for women at Ida Noyes Hall. Not less than $7.00 a week should be al- 
lowed for table board. 

ESTIMATE OF EXPENSES 

The following table will enable the student to form an estimate of the quarterly 
expenses, exclusive of tuition fees, which are common to all students in the university. 





Low 


Average 


Liberal 




$ 48 
84 
15 
13 
15 


$ 75 
100 
40 
25 
35 


$100 




115 




50 


Textbooks and supplies 


40 
55 






Total 


$175 


$275 


$360 







II. IN THE VICINITY OF RUSH MEDICAL COLLEGE 

Board and lodging. — Rooms may be obtained in the vicinity of the College at from 
$5.00 to $7.00 per week. Day board may be had at from $8.00 to $11.00 per week. 
Board and room together may be obtained at from $12.00 to $15.00 per week. A Bureau 
of Information is maintained at the Y.M.C.A., to which students may apply for direc- 
tions as to desirable board and lodging. 

Books and instruments. — The average annual cost of the required books and 
instruments varies from $50.00 to $80.00. 

The following table will furnish an estimate of the expenses of a student for each 
year at Rush Medical College : 





Lowest 


Average 


Liberal 




$300.00 

350.00 

40.00 

50.00 

60.00 


$300.00 

450.00 

60.00 

65.00 

100.00 


$ 300.00 




550.00 




75.00 




80.00 




140.00 






Total 


$800.00 


$975.00 


$1,145.00 







THE MEDICAL SCHOOLS 101 



FELLOWSHIPS AND OTHER AIDS 

FELLOWSHIPS 

Fellowships are awarded annually by the President, upon the recommendation of 
the Committees on Fellowships and Scholarships, to graduate students who desire to 
pursue advanced work in some special line. 

Applications for Fellowships. — Applications for Fellowships should be addressed 
to the Committee on Fellowships and Scholarships, Cobb Hall, Room 115, and should 
be in their hands on or before March 1. 

Appointments to Fellowships. — 

a) Date. — The annual appointments to Fellowships are made April 1. Appointees 
are given until April 15 to accept or decline. A fellowship is available for any three 
of the four quarters, beginning with the Summer Quarter, following the date of appoint- 
ment. 

b) Attainments required. — The candidate must have attained proficiency in some 
department. In general, he should have spent at least one year in resident study after 
receiving his Bachelor's degree. In making the appointment special weight is given to 
dissertations indicating the candidate's ability to conduct original investigation. 

Quarterly Reports. — Each fellow makes a written report to the Dean at the begin- 
ning of each quarter. This report outlines his work as a student, and the work assigned 
to him as an officer of the University for the current quarter, and is indorsed by the 
head of the department. The report blanks may be procured at the office of the Com- 
mittee as given above. 

A. UNIVERSITY FELLOWSHIPS 

Appropriations are made annually from the general funds of the University for 
the maintenance of Fellowships in the Graduate Schools of Arts, Literature, and Science. 
These Fellowships at present range in value from $210, the tuition fees of a graduate 
student for three quarters, to an amount $600 in excess of those fees. 

The University asks of each of these Fellows a modicum of service, consisting of 
work (a) as an instructor; (b) as an assistant in reading examination papers; (c) as an 
assistant on a University journal; or (d) as an assistant in one of the departmental 
laboratories, museums, or libraries. In no case is a Fellow expected to devote so much 
time to the work here indicated as to interfere seriously with his study. 

B. ENDOWED AND ANNUAL FELLOWSHIPS 
AND RESEARCH FUNDS 

AVAILABLE FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS IN THE MEDICAL SCHOOLS 

In addition to the regular University Fellowships mentioned, there are special 
Fellowships offered by individuals. These vary somewhat in number and amount from 
year to year. At present they are as follows: 

The Joseph B. Loewenthal Fellowship in Chemistry, endowed by Mr. Berthold 
Loewenthal, of Chicago, as a memorial of his son, Joseph B. Loewenthal. It yields 
$400 to the incumbent annually appointed, and is awarded on the nomination of the 
Department of Chemistry and the approval of the President of the University. 

The Gustavus F. Swift Fellowship in Chemistry, endowed by Mrs. Gustavus F. 
Swift, Chicago, as a memorial of her husband, Gustavus F. Swift. It yields about $920 



102 THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO 

to the incumbent annually appointed, and is awarded for especial ability in research 
on the nomination of the Department of Chemistry and the approval of the President 
of the University. 

The Edith Barnard Memorial Fellowship in Chemistry, established in memory of 
Dr. Edith Barnard, yields $180 a year, and is awarded by the University, on nomination 
of the Department of Chemistry and the approval of the President of the University, 
to some deserving graduate student. 

The National Research Council Fellowships to promote scientific research, provided 
by the Rockefeller Foundation, are awarded by the National Research Council. Fellows 
may choose the institution in which they desire to pursue research. Applications should 
be made to the National Research Council, Washington, D.C. 

The Mr. and Mrs. Frank G. Logan Fellowships, endowed by Mr. Frank G. Logan, 
are available for research in Medicine, Surgery, and Bacteriology and Pathology. Ap- 
pointments are made by the President on nomination of the Frank G. Logan Fellow- 
ship Committee. The sum of $6,000.00 is available annually. 

The Seymour Coman Fellowships, to be used for scientific research with special 
reference to preventive medicine and the cause, prevention, and cure of diseases. The 
candidate must have the qualifications of the degree of M.D. or Ph.D. and must devote 
his entire time to research. Appointments are made by the President on nomination 
of the Seymour Coman Research Committee. The sum of $8,600 is available annually. 

The Arthur Lowenstein Research Fellowship, established in connection with the 
newly organized Institute of Meat Packing, the results of research to be made available 
to the entire Meat Packing Industry. The Fellow is to work under the direction of the 
Chairman of the Department of Hygiene and Bacteriology. Awarded by a joint Ad- 
ministrative Committee of the Institute of Meat Packing and the University of Chicago. 

The Fleischmann Fellowship yields $1,500 annually for a Fellowship in the Depart- 
ment of Physiological Chemistry or in the Department of Physiology, and the appoint- 
ment is made by the President on the nomination of the Chairman of either department. 

The Laura Thome Donnelley Fellowship yields $1,500 annually for a fellowship 
in the Department of Physiology and is awarded on the nomination of the Chairman of 
the Department of Physiology and the approval of the President. 

The Talcott Fellowships, endowed by Mr. William A. Talcott, of Rockford, Illinois, 
provide tuition fees to the amount of $600 a year. The fund is reserved for graduate 
students, preferably for graduates of Rockford College. 

The John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowships offer to scholars, 
both men and women, opportunities under the freest possible conditions to carry on 
advanced study and research in any field of knowledge, or opportunities for the develop- 
ment of unusual talent in any of the fine arts, including music. Application should be 
made to the Secretary of the Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, 2300 Pershing Square 
Building, New York City. 

The Douglas Smith Foundation. Funds are appropriated to support various research 
projects in medicine. Number of fellowships awarded and amount of each fellowship 
varies according to problems under investigation and qualifications of holders of fellow- 
ships. Awarded on recommendation of the Committee on Administration, Professor 
H. Gideon Wells, Secretary. The sum of $48,000 is available annually. 

The Dane Billings Memorial Fellowship in Medicine, for research in Medicine. 
Awarded on recommendation of the Dean of Rush Medical College. The sum of $500 
is available annually. 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOLS 103 

The Daniel R. Brower Fellowship, awarded on recommendation of the Dean of 
Rush Medical College. The sum of $250 is available annually. 

The Stanton Abeles Friedberg Fellowship in Laryngology and Otology, awarded on 
recommendation of the Dean of Rush Medical College. The sum of $460 is available 
annually. 

The Francis A. Hardy Fellowship in Surgery and Assistant House Surgeonship in 
the Presbyterian Hospital, awarded by the Department of Surgery of Rush Medical 
College to a graduate in Medicine. The sum of $600 is available annually. 

The Hyde Memorial Fellowship, to promote research in skin diseases and cancer. 
Awarded on recommendation of the Chairman of the Department of Dermatology of 
Rush Medical College. The sum of $1,600 is available annually. 

The Fellowship in Pathology, awarded on recommendation of the Department of 
Pathology of Rush Medical College. The sum of $600 is available annually. 

The Nicholas Senn Fellowship in Surgery, awarded on recommendation of the 
Chairman of the Department of Surgery of Rush Medical College to a graduate in 
Medicine. The sum of $600 is available annually. 

The A. D. Thomson-Bevan Fellowship in Surgery and House Surgeonship in the 
Presbyterian Hospital, awarded on recommendation of the Chairman of the Department 
of Surgery of Rush Medical College to a graduate in Medicine. The sum of $500 is 
available annually. 

The Mr. and Mrs. Isaac Fish Fellowship in Ophthalmology, for research in Ophthal- 
mology. Awarded on recommendation of the Chairman of the Department of Ophthal- 
mology of Rush Medical College to a graduate in Medicine. The sum of $1,000 is 
available annually. 

Frank Billings Fellowship in Medicine, awarded on recommendation of the Chair- 
man of the Department of Medicine. The sum of $150 is available annually. 

RESEARCH FOUNDATIONS AND SPECIAL RESEARCH FUNDS 

Louis B. and Emma M. Kuppenheimer Foundation, for study of structure function? 
and diseases of the eye. The sum of $4,500 is available annually. 

Lasker Foundation, for research in causes, nature, prevention, and cure of degenera- 
tive diseases. The sum of $50,000 is available annually. 

A. D. Thomson Medical Fund, for genito-urinary surgery. The sum of $2,500 is 
available annually. 

Gerard Van Schaick Fund, for investigation of the pathology of the eye. The sum 
of $500 is available annually. 

Grant from Committee on Research on Syphilis. The sum of $2,750 is available 
annually. 

Tuberculosis Fund. The sum of $8,500 is available annually. 

Infantile Paralysis Fund. The sum of $12,500 is available in 1929-30. 

Fund for Research on Venereal Disease. The sum of $12,000 is available annually. 

John Hertz Research, disorders of the pituitary gland and related conditions. The 
sum of $15,000 is available annually. 

T. J. Williams Fund, given by Mr. T. J. Williams for research in diseases of the 
eye. Cataract research. The sum of $1,000 is available annually. 



104 THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO 

A. SCHOLARSHIPS 

I. HONOR SCHOLARSHIPS 

Graduate Honor Scholarships. — Scholarships are assigned to students who have 
completed with honor the work of the Senior College. Each department of the Uni- 
versity, with the approval of the Committee on Fellowships and Scholarships, has the 
privilege of naming a student who is for that year the honor student of the Senior 
College in that department, and to this student there is given a scholarship yielding in 
each case a sum equal to the University tuition fees for three quarters, provided the 
student continues his studies in the Graduate Schools. The assignments are made in the 
Spring Quarter, and in no case does a scholarship continue beyond the end of the Spring 
Quarter next following the date of assignment. 

II. ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIPS 

The Mr. and Mrs. William N. Eisendrath Scholarships, endowed by the children of 
Mr. and Mrs. William N. Eisendrath, yield about $325 annually, to be awarded to 
undergraduate or graduate students for their maintenance, aid, or tuition fees. 

The Permelia Brown Scholarships, provided for under the will of Permelia Brown, 
offer aid to unmarried American-born women students who are residents of Chicago. 
(Both graduate and undergraduate students are eligible.) 

The Marie J. Mergler Scholarship yields annual fees to a young woman student 
specializing in Physiology. 

The Harry Ginsburg Memorial Fund, established in memory of Harry Ginsburg, 
yields $100 a year and is awarded annually as a scholarship to an undergraduate medical 
student in the Department of Physiology, the recipient to be designated by the Chair- 
man of the Department on the basis of industry, sincerity, and ability. Awarded, 1928, 
to Carl A. Johnson. 

The Frederick A . Smith Scholarship Fund, established in 1920 by the will of Judge 
Frederick A. Smith, of Chicago, provides annually the sum of $1,576. Appointment 
is made on the basis of scholarship and need. Both graduate and undergraduate stu- 
dents are eligible. 

The La Verne Noyes Foundation, established July 5, 1918, by the gift of Mr. 
La Verne Noyes, provides, in the Colleges and in the Graduate and Professional 
Schools, tuition scholarships for deserving students who (1) shall themselves have 
served in the Army or Navy of the United States in the war for liberty into which the 
Republic entered on April 6, 1917, providing that such service was terminated by 
honorable discharge; or (2) shall be descendants by blood of anyone in service in the 
Army or Navy of the United States who served in said war; or (3) shall be descendants 
by blood of anyone who served in the Army or Navy of the United States in said war, 
provided that such service was terminated by an honorable death or an honorable dis- 
charge. Application should be made to the chairman of the Committee on La Verne 
Noyes Scholarships. 

The Henry Strong Scholarships, provided for under the will of General Henry 
Strong, offer aid to students possessing not only zeal for scholarship but also character 
and those traits tending to leadership. 

The Sydney Walker III Scholarship in Physiology, established by Dr. Sydney 
Walker, Jr., in memory of his son, yields $250 annually. The nomination is made by 
the Department of Physiology on the basis of ability and promise in research, and the 
holder is required to devote the major part of his time to research in Physiology. 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOLS 105 

The E. Fletcher Ingals, Jr., Scholarship in Laryngology and Otology, yielding $600 
annually, is awarded to a physician who is seeking to qualify himself for the practice 
of laryngology and otology. Opportunity is afforded the holder of this scholarship for 
advanced work and clinical training. Awarded in 1928-29 to Dr. Richard W. Watkins. 

The La Verne Noyes Scholarships, fifty in number, are granted to students in Rush 
Medical College who served, in the World War. Application should be made to the 
Committe on La Verne Noyes Scholarships in Rush Medical College. 

HOSPITAL INTERNES 

Positions as internes, by appointment or through a competitive examination held 
by the respective hospital staffs, are open each spring to graduates of Rush Medical 
College in the following Chicago hospitals: Presbyterian, Children's Memorial, Home 
for Destitute Crippled Children, Cook County, Michael Reese, St. Joseph's, St. Luke's, 
Augustana, Alexian Brothers', Passavant, Chicago Policlinic, Norwegian- American, 
Illinois Charitable Eye and Ear Infirmary, St. Anthony's, Swedish, Chicago Lying-in, 
and others, and in a much larger list of institutions outside of the city of Chicago which 
make appointments from the students of the Senior class in Rush Medical College. 
The occupants of these positions receive their board and lodging and acquire experi- 
ence in practical Medicine and Surgery. 

B. PRIZES 

The John Billings Fiske Prize in Poetry, established by Horace Spencer Fiske as 
a memorial to his father. The prize of approximately $50 is to be awarded annually 
to the graduate or undergraduate student in any division of the University who pre- 
sents a poem adjudged best by the head of the English Department, a leading American 
poet, and a leading American critic. 

The Howard T. Ricketts Prize, $250 or more, is awarded on the third day of May to 
a student of the University of Chicago presenting the best results in research in Pathol- 
ogy or Bacteriology. Awarded in 1927 to Casper I. Nelson. 

The Rosenberger Medal, founded by Mr. and Mrs. Jesse L. Rosenberger, is awarded 
by the University of Chicago in recognition of achievement through research, in author- 
ship, in invention, for discovery, for unusual public service, or for anything deemed of 
great benefit to humanity. If at any time it is thought best, the awards may be re- 
stricted preferentially, or even wholly, to persons connected with the University of 
Chicago and its various departments, including all the faculty and other instructors, 
all the students, graduate and undergraduate, and all the graduates both of the Uni- 
versity and of all the departments thereof. 

PRIZES IN RUSH MEDICAL COLLEGE 

The Benjamin Rush Prize. — A medal and the sum of $50 is given by the Faculty 
at each commencement to that member of the graduating class who passes the highest 
examination in every department of Medicine represented that year in the examination 
for the degree. Awarded in 1929 to Merlyn George Henry, A.B., S.M. 

The Daniel Brainerd Prize. — A medal is annually given by the Faculty to the 
student who makes and presents to the College Museum the best accepted dissection 
in Surgical Anatomy. Awarded in 1929 to Donald Roth Laird, A.B. 

The Freer Prizes. — These prizes are derived from the income of a fund presented 
to the College by the late Nathan M. Freer, of the Board of Trustees, as a memorial 



106 THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO 

to the names of two honored members of his family long identified with the highest 
interests of this institution. 

*The J. W. Freer Medal and the sum of $50 are awarded as a first prize to that 
member of the Junior or Senior class who presents the best dissertation involving 
original investigation on the part of the student. A second prize of $25 is awarded 
to the next successful competitor. The dissertations must be submitted to the Dean 
of Rush Medical College on or before April 1, 1930. 

First prize not awarded in 1929. 

Second prize not awarded in 1929. 

The L. C. P. Freer Medal and the sum of $50 are offered as a first prize to that 
member of the Freshman or Sophomore class who presents the best dissertation involv- 
ing investigation on the part of the student. A second prize of $25 will be awarded 
to the next most successful of the competitors. The prize will be competed for by students 
in the medical courses in the University. The dissertation must be placed in the hands of 
the Dean of Medical Students by April 1, 1930. 

First prize not awarded in 1929. 

Second prize not awarded in 1929. 

The De Laskie Miller Prize given by his grandchildren, for the best work in the 
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, was awarded in 1929 to Ruth Renter 
Darrow, A.B. 

The Henry M. Lyman Prize. — In memory of Henry M. Lyman, who for many years 
devoted much of his best energies and his unusual ability to the upbuilding of Rush 
Medical College, and who served successfully as Professor of Physiology and Neurology 
and Professor of Medicine and who was later Dean of the Faculty, a fund has been 
created by his children, the proceeds of which, amounting to $25 a year, will be offered 
as a prize to the member of the Junior or Senior class who shall present the best disserta- 
tion on a topic connected with internal medicine. This dissertation must include the 
results of original laboratory or ward work or of personal clinical observation. Before 
the work is undertaken by the student the Head of the Department of Medicine should 
be consulted as to the choice of subject and other details. 

Not awarded in 1929. 

The Howard T. Ricketts Prize. — In memory of Dr. Howard Taylor Ricketts, at 
one time a member of the Department of Pathology, who died of typhus fever, while 
investigating that disease, in the City of Mexico, May 3, 1910, this Department has 
established a prize in Dermatology. This prize, of the value of $25, will be awarded 
annually to the student presenting the best dissertation embodying the results of 
original investigation on some topic related to Dermatology. 

C. UNIVERSITY SERVICE 

I. DEPARTMENTAL SERVICE 

Graduate. — A limited number of assignments to service, yielding a part or all of 

the tuition fees for three quarters, are available for graduate students of attainment 

and promise. This service is usually rendered in the department in which the student 

* Rules governing the award of the Freer medals. — (1) The candidate must present his dissertation in 
typewritten form. (2) Each candidate may present but one dissertation. (3) As the purpose of the medals 
is to stimulate research, only those dissertations will be considered that have been written in competition 
for the medal. This will exclude those published previous to their presentation to the committee and those 
that were written for a degree. (4) Applicable to the J. W. Freer Medal only. Only those dissertations that 
are submitted by bona fide Juniors and Seniors will be considered. Students acting as assistants to instruc- 
tors and receiving compensation therefor cannot compete for the prize. 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOLS 107 

is doing the major part of his work. Students in departmental service pay their tuition 
fees in cash at the beginning of each quarter. At the close of the quarter they receive 
a cash payment for the amount of the service if it has been satisfactorily rendered. 

Assignments of this class are awarded preferably to students who desire to work in 
a special department rather than to those who desire to pursue general courses. Appli- 
cation should be made to the Deans of the Graduate Schools of Arts, Literature, and 
Science. 

H. LIBRARY SERVICE 

Applicants for positions in Library service are appointed to service by the Libraries. 
Students holding such appointments must maintain a grade of academic work satis- 
factory to their Deans and of service satisfactory to the Libraries. Such students are 
required to pay their fees in cash at the office of the Cashier within the first five days 
of the quarter. For whatever service they may satisfactorily render they will be paid 
in cash at the end of the quarter. 

in. MISCELLANEOUS SERVICE 

Other forms of student service are: (a) messenger service at the Information 
Office, applications for which should be addressed to the Cashier; (b) service in the 
University Choirs, applications for which should be addressed to the Director of the 
University Choirs; (c) service in the University Band, applications for which should be 
addressed to the Director of the University Band; (d) service in the Commons, the 
compensation being furnished in board. Inquiries with regard to this sendee should 
be addressed to the Director of the Commons; (e) temporary stenographic or clerical 
service for members of the Faculty or administrative officers, and occasionally special 
service in the laboratories. When such opportunities occur, notices are posted on the 
bulletin board in front of Cobb Lecture Hall, and detailed information is obtainable 
at the Employment Bureau. 

IV. OUTSIDE EMPLOYMENT 

The University maintains an Employment Bureau through which many kinds of 
work are found for students who are compelled to depend in whole or in part upon their 
own resources. 

D. LOAN FUNDS 

From funds created by friends of the University loans are made to many students 
of worth and promise who need temporary aid. These funds are limited and are usually 
exhausted early in the academic year. 

A special circular entitled Awards and Aids will be sent on request. It gives details 
concerning all the forms of aid, routine of application, etc 

The Clara M. Coit Loan Fund for Medical Students is established to aid needy 
students who give promise of unusual service in medicine. Interest is charged at the 
rate of 4 per cent. Application should be made to the Dean of Medical Students. 

The Medical Students' Loan Fund, established by the Physicians Association of 
Cook County, is available for medical students, preferably colored, and is loaned with 
interest at 4 per cent. 



108 THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO 

LIBRARIES, LABORATORIES, AND MUSEUMS 
A. THE LIBRARIES 

The Libraries of the University include the General Library and the Departmental 
Libraries, including the Library of Rush Medical College. 

The General Library is a reference and circulating library and is open to students 
in all departments of the University. Students who have matriculated and paid their 
library fees may take out at one time six volumes from the General Library and other 
libraries open to circulation, but not more than three from any one library. These may 
be kept two weeks, with privilege of extension of loan in special cases. The library is 
open week days from 8:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. (Saturday, 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.), holi- 
days and vacations excepted. In the latter it is open from 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. daily. 

The Library of the Biological Departments is housed in Hull Court in Culver Hall 
in the building formerly occupied by Physiology. It is conveniently accessible to all stu- 
dents working in these departments. It includes the General Medical Library. 

The Library of the School of Education is open to the use of all members of the 
University. It is open each week day from 8:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. except Saturday, 
when it closes at 4:00 p.m. Books may be drawn for two weeks. 

The Library of the Divinity School, the Geology and Geography Library, and the 
Classical Library are administered under the same rules as the General Library. 

The Law Library is conducted as a reference library, chiefly for the use of law 
students, but open to other members of the University. It is open week days from 
8:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. (Saturday, 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.). 

The Departmental Libraries are primarily for the use of advanced students in the 
respective departments. 

The Libraries contain at the present time over 760,000 volumes bound and cata- 
logued. They receive 4,143 current periodical publications, including in part the trans- 
actions and proceedings of learned societies. Technical periodicals are, as a rule, found 
in the Departmental Libraries. 

The Library of Rush Medical College contains 27,616 volumes, 4,929 pamphlets, 
and files of all the leading medical journals in English, German, and French. During 
the last college year the library had a daily average attendance of 199 students. 

B. THE LABORATORIES 

The Kent and Jones Chemical Laboratories and the Ryerson Physical Laboratory 
contain rooms for special research, small laboratories for work of investigation, large 
laboratories for general instruction, lecture-rooms, classrooms, library, museum, and 
offices. 

The Hull Biological Laboratories are a group of four buildings devoted to the 
study of the anatomical, botanical, and zoological sciences. Laboratory for work in 
preventive medicine is located in these buildings. The Whitman Laboratory of Experi- 
mental Zoology, the gift of Professor and Mrs. Frank R. Lillie, affords opportunity for 
research work in this department. 

New laboratories for Physiology, Physiological Chemistry, and Pharmacology 
adjoin the Albert Merritt Billings Hospital on the Quadrangles and comprise seven 
floors including the ground floor. Mechanics' shops, storerooms, and freezing-room are 
located on the ground floor. All floors are provided with mechanical refrigerators, 
automatic elevators, and dumb waiters. 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOLS 109 

The section devoted to Physiology includes large laboratories for undergraduate 
and graduate courses, for work in general physiology and in physiological optics, many 
research rooms and special laboratories for basal metabolism, electrocardiographic, and 
X-ray studies. 

The section devoted to Physiological Chemistry provides on the lower floors large 
laboratories for the work of the fundamental courses, lecture rooms, rooms for balances, 
ovens, polariscopes, solutions, Kjeldahl apparatus, hydrogen sulphide work, conferences, 
etc., large laboratories for advanced work together with many smaller rooms for research 
and work on special problems. One floor is devoted especially to work involving the 
application of physical chemistry to biological problems. The fifth floor is devoted to 
Pharmacology providing laboratories for chemical and mammalian work, operating 
rooms, research rooms, and conference rooms. Animal rooms, operating rooms, steriliz- 
ing rooms, etc., are on the sixth floor. 

Extensive new laboratories for Pathology were occupied in the Autumn of 1927. 
The new building is incorporated with the buildings of the Billings Hospital and the 
University Clinics. 

The Frank Billings Medical Clinic incorporates within a single architectural unit 
the laboratories of the Department of Medicine and those portions of the Albert Merritt 
Billings Hospital and the Max Epstein Clinic in which the Department of Medicine 
cares for patients. The laboratories which are unusually extensive and complete afford 
facilities for teaching and for employment of the methods used in the investigation of 
diseases, including those common to medicine and biology, physiology and chemistry. 

The facilities, of the Surgical Department which are all located in one building 
comprise 100 beds in the Albert Merritt Billings Hospital,- an out-patient department 
with separate divisions for general surgery and the surgical specialties and classrooms 
and laboratories in the Medical School. Laboratory space in a student's room is as- 
signed to each student registered in the Department of Surgery where both routine and 
investigative work may be performed. 

LABORATORIES AT RUSH MEDICAL COLLEGE 

The Rawson Clinical Laboratory was originally made possible through the 
generous gift of $300,000 by Frederick H. Rawson, president of the Union Trust 
Company. It has been erected at the northeastern corner of South Wood and Harrison 
streets on the ground formerly occupied by the old Rush Clinical Building. It covers 
an area approximately 90 by 100 feet and is five stories in height. Connections have 
been made with Senn Hall on all floors, and with the Presbyterian Hospital. The build- 
ing houses the administration offices of the College and the large medical library and 
special Faculty rooms on the first floor. The Departments of Occupational Therapy, 
Hydrotherapy, locker-rooms and restrooms, and the library workroom are in the 
basement. 

It is planned that the Department of Occupational Therapy will establish contact 
with the industries of Chicago and vicinity for the purpose of training and placing in 
positions of employment persons suffering from various physical handicaps. 

The second, third, and fourth floors are devoted to various departments of the 
Central Free Dispensary, classrooms, and laboratories. 

On the fifth floor is the Department of Pathology, housed in the Norman Bridge 
Laboratories of Pathology. Dr. and Mrs. Norman Bridge, of Los Angeles, contributed 
$100,000 in order to enable the University to build the fifth story of this building. 



110 THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO 

The building is so constructed that two stories may eventually be added to it to 
meet the increasing needs of the Rush Postgraduate School. 

Senn Hall, erected through the munificence of the late Professor Senn and other 
members of the Faculty, adjoins the Clinical Building on the east. It covers a ground 
space of 40 by 90 feet, is eight stories in height (including the basement), and of abso- 
lutely fireproof construction. The basement and first three floors, affording over 10,000 ' 
square feet of floor space, are devoted to the dispensary and the clinical teaching con- 
nected therewith. In 1928-29 patients made 104,791 visits to the dispensary and 
19,353 new patients were received. The fourth and fifth floors are occupied by clinical 
laboratories and conference rooms. The remaining two stories contain two surgical 
and medical amphitheaters, seating about 140 each, with necessary waiting and prepara- 
tion rooms. 

The Laboratory Building, on the south side of Harrison Street, is 100 by 45 
feet in area and six stories in height (including basement). This building provides 
facilities for research and for instruction in Operative Surgery, Surgical Anatomy, 
Pharmacology, and Therapeutics. 

HOSPITALS 

With the opening of the Albert Merritt Billings Hospital and the Max Epstein 
Dispensary for the treatment of ambulatory patients, clinical facilities for medical 
students are afforded at the University Quadrangles. The Hospital and Dispensary are 
the first units of a group of clinics to be built on the Quadrangles, designed not only 
with the idea of giving the best possible care to patients, but of providing all the 
facilities desirable for the instruction of students in clinical medicine and of carrying on 
investigation and research. 

The Hospital contains two hundred and eight beds for use by the Medical and 
Surgical Departments and the Out-Patient Department is of sufficient size to care for 
several hundred patients daily. The Medical Department and the Surgical Department 
occupy connecting buildings which contain their laboratories and accommodations for 
clinical work. 

During 1928 construction will be started on three additions to the hospital facilities 
on the Quadrangles, including the Chicago Lying-in-Hospital and Dispensary, the Bobs 
Roberts Memorial Hospital for children, and the Nancy S. McElwee Memorial and 
Gertrude Dunn Hicks Memorial, both for Orthopedic Surgery. These additions will 
increase the bed capacity of the group to a total in excess of 500. 

The Presbyterian Hospital, with 430 beds and over 11,000 admissions per year, 
adjoins Rush Medical College and is connected with it. Close co-operation is maintained 
between hospital and college, and opportunity is afforded students of studying patients 
in the wards. 

ATTENDING STAFF OF THE PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL 

MEDICINE 

Consulting Physicians: Drs. Frank Billings, John M. Dodson, James B. Her- 
rick, John A. Robison. 

Attending Physicians: Drs. Ernest E. Irons, Wilber E. Post, Rollin T. 
Woodyatt, Ralph C. Brown, George F. Dick. 

Associate Attending Physicians: Drs. James M. Washburn, Theodore Tieken, 
Samuel R. Slaymaker, Donald P. Abbott, James R. Greer, William A. Thomas, 
Lee C. Gatewood. 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOLS 111 

Assistant Attending Physicians: Drs. Howard M. Sheaff, Frank B. Kelly, 
James B. Eyerly, Homer K. Nicoll, William G. Hibbs, Edward J. Stieglitz, 
Charles M. Bacon, Alva A. Knight, Clayton J. Lundy, Leo K. Campbell, John 
S. Ashby, Ralph W. Trimmer, Arthur J. Atkinson. 

Resident Physician: Dr. Laurence Cooley. 

DISEASES OF CHILDREN 

Attending Pediatrician: Dr. Clifford G. Grulee. 

Associate Attending Pediatricians: Drs. Arthur H. Parmelee, Charles K. 
Stulik. 

Assistant Attending Pediatricians: Drs. Heyworth N. Sanford, Eleanor I. 
Leslie, William L. Buhrman, John J. Zavertnik. 

Resident Pediatrician: Dr. Ernest S. Watson. 

PSYCHIATRY AND NEUROLOGY 

Attending Neurologists: Drs. Thor Rothstein, Peter Bassoe. 

Associate Attending Neurologist: Dr. James C. Gill. 

Assistant Atte?iding Neurologist: Drs. Loren W. Avery, Josephine E. Young. 

surgery 

Consulting Surgeon: Dr. William T. Belfield. 

Attending Surgeon: Dr. Arthur D. Bevan. 

Associate Attending Surgeons: Drs. Carl B. Davis, Vernon C. David, Kellogg 
Speed, Gatewood Gate wood, Charles A. Parker (Orthopedic Surgery), Frederick 
B. Moorehead (Oral Surgery), Herman L. Kretschmer, Robert H. Herbst (Urolo- 
gy). 

Assistant Attending Surgeons: Drs. Albert H. Montgomery, Edwin M. Miller, 
Francis H. Straus, Harry A. Oberhelman, Golder L. McWhorter, Hillier L. 
Baker, George H. Jackson, Jr., William J. Gallagher, Elven J. Berkheiser 
(Orthopedic Surgery), Willis J. Potts, Bernard P. Mullen, Randolph F. Olmsted, 
Earl McCarthy. 

Anaesthetist: Dr. Isabella Herb. 

Assistant Anaesthetists: Drs. Mary Lyons, Alice McNeal, Nora B. Branden- 
burg. 

Roentgenologist: Dr. Cassie Bell Rose. 

Resident Surgeons: Drs. Mark L. Loring, Arthur E. Diggs. 

obstetrics and gynecology 
Attending Obstetricians and Gynecologists: Drs. Noble S. Heaney, Carey Cul- 
bertson. 

Associate Obstetrician and Gynecologist: Dr. Aaron E. Kanter. 
Assistant Attending Obstetricians and Gynecologists: Drs. Edward Allen, Carl 
Philip Bauer. 

laryngology and otology 

Attending Laryngologist and Otologist: Dr. George E. Shambaugh. 
Associate Attending Laryngologist and Otologist: Dr. Daniel B. Hayden. 
Assistant Attending Laryngologist and Otologists: Drs. George A. Torrison, 
Thomas W. Lewis, Edwin McGinnis, Elmer W. Hagens. 

Resident Laryngologist and Otologist: Richard W. Watkins. 



114 THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO 

The Country Home for Convalescent Children, at Prince Crossing, Illinois, a 
few miles west of Chicago, is in affiliation with Rush Medical College. It has for its 
purpose the care, cure, and education of helpless and crippled children. 

ATTENDING STAFF OF THE COUNTRY HOME FOR CONVALESCENT CHILDREN 

Orthopedic Surgeons: Drs. Charles A. Parker and Elven J. Berkheiser. 

Consulting Surgeon: Dr. Arthur Dean Bevan. 

Consulting Physician: Dr. James B. Herrick. 

Laryngologist and Otologist: Dr. Daniel B. Hayden. 

Oculist: Dr. Wm. G. Reeder. 

Oral Surgeon: Dr. Frederick B. Moorehead. 

The Children's Memorial Hospital, 735 Fullerton Avenue, affiliated with the 
University of Chicago, has 176 beds. 

ATTENDING STAFF 

In Medicine: Dr. Joseph Brenneman, Chief of Staff. Drs. George E. Baxter, 
Archibald Hoyne, William B. McClure, C. A. Aldrich, N. A. Bachmann, Louis D. 
Minsk, Franklin J. Corper, Gustav Kaufmann, Sigurd H. Kraft, C. Schott, 
William R. Whitley, John L. Reichert, Bert I. Beverly, J. C. Coughlin, 
Beatrice W. Hawkins, Julius Rhodes, A. H. Roler, J. H. Wallace, A. J. Weigen, 
S. C. Henn, Katherine Mayer, James J. McCarthy, Harold A. Rosenbaum, Alvah 
L. Newcomb. 

In Neurology: Dr. Ralph Hamill. 

In Dermatology: Dr. E. A. Oliver, Clark W. Finnerud. 

In Surgery: Drs. Albert Horr Montgomery, John A. Graham, Edwin M. 
Miller, Frederick B. Moorehead, E. C. Burkett, Jay Ireland, George Jackson, 
E. C. McGill. 

In Orthopedics: Drs. E. J. Berkheiser, Edson B. Fowler, F. A. Seidler. 

In Ophthalmology: Drs. Edwin McGinnis, Alfred M. Hall, Richard G. Gam- 
ble, W. A. Yeakel. 

In Otolaryngology: Drs. John C. Williams, T. C. Galloway, Myron Kahn, 
Chester H. Lockwood, Norman Leschin, Lloyd A. Schipfer, Maurice H. Cottle. 

In Roentgenology: Dr. C. Johnston Davis. 

In Pathology: Dr. William G. Hibbs. 

resident staff 

Senior Resident: John S. McDavid. 
Junior Resident: Norman T. Welford. 



St. Joseph's Hospital, 2100 Burling Street, became affiliated with Rush Medical 
College in 1915. The hospital is conducted by the Sisters of Charity, St. Vincent de 
Paul, and has 210 beds. 

Extra-mural courses. — Through the courtesy of the medical attendants and man- 
aging officers of several hospitals and dispensaries within convenient distance of the 
College extra-mural clinical courses are offered to the students of Rush, in small groups, 
and the clinical material available for teaching has thus been greatly augmented. Such 
courses are offered at the West Side Hebrew Dispensary, treating over 30,000 cases 
annually; at St. Luke's Hospital, with about 2,000 cases annually; at the Illinois 
Charitable Eye and Ear Infirmary, treating about 1,000 cases; at the Chicago Isolation 
Hospital; and at St. Anthony's Hospital, with about 100 beds. 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOLS 115 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

The Alumni Association of Rush Medical College, which is part of the University 
of Chicago Alumni Association, holds yearly meetings. These meetings occur on the 
date of the Summer Convocation in June. All graduates of the College in good stand- 
ing are eligible to membership, which can be obtained by the payment of two dollars, 
the annual dues. The officers for the year ending July 1, 1929, were as follows: 



OFFICERS 

President Samuel R. Slaymaker, '92, Chicago 

First Vice-President Gatewood Gate wood, Ml, Chicago 

Second Vice-President Jesse R. Kauffman, '07, Chicago 

Third Vice-President Joseph F. Duane, '03, Peoria, 111. 

Necrologist Frank W. Allin, '05, Chicago 

Treasurer (three years) Carl O. Rinder, '13, Chicago 

Secretary (three years) Charles A. Parker, '91, Chicago 

t^ ~ XT f Dallas B. Phemister, '04, Chicago 

Directors for Three Years < _, _, „ . M ' 

{ Roy R. Ferguson, '03, Chicago 

.~ ~ , r f Nathan P. Colwell, '00, Chicago 

Directors for Two Years { T T _ T ,-„«,*. 

1 Josiah J. Moore, '12, Chicago 

.~ ~ Ar f Kellogg Speed, '04, Chicago 

Directors for One Year < T _ ,,' ' . ° 

[ Leroy Sloan, '17, Chicago 

(Ralph C. Brown, '04, Chicago 
Frederick B. Moorehead, '06, Chicago 
George H. Coleman, '13, Chicago 



DEGREES OF MASTER OF SCIENCE IN THE MEDICAL 

SCIENCES CONFERRED IN THE SPRING, SUMMER, 

AUTUMN, AND WINTER QUARTERS, 1928-29 

James Roy Blayney Pathology 

Franklin Smith DuBois Anatomy 

Charles Clayton Evans Hygiene and Bacteriology 

Mary Reed Ferguson Hygiene and Bacteriology 

Allyn King Foster, Jr. Pathology 

Walter Eugene Gower Physiological Chemistry and Pharmacology 

Irene E. Jarra Hygiene and Bacteriology 

Gene Haviland Kistler Physiology 

Barclay E. Noble Physiology 



116 



THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO 



DEGREES OF DOCTOR OF MEDICINE CONFERRED 
IN 1928-29 

The degree of Doctor of Medicine was conferred on the following students at the 
close of the Summer Quarter, August 31, 1928. The students had completed five years 
of medical work, the fifth year consisting of an acceptable service as an interne in a 
hospital approved by the Faculty of the College: 

Illinois Central Hospital 



Solon William Cameron 

S.B., University of Chicago, 1927 

Paul Andrew Campbell 

S.B., University of Chicago, 1924 

Russell Cowgill Carrell 

S.B., University of Chicago, 1924 

Helen Caryl Coyle 

S.B., University of Chicago, 1924 

Jerry DeVries 

A.B., Hope College, 1923 

Clarence Owen Edwards 

A.B., Brigham Young University, 1923 

Victor Emil Engelmann 

S.B., University of Wisconsin, 1925 

Isaac Myron Felsher 

S.B., University of Chicago, 1924 

Leland Stanford Fuller 

S.B., University of Chicago, 1924 

Anton Philip Hess 

S.B., University of Chicago, 1924 

Roy Rachford Kracke 

S.B., University of Alabama, 1924 

Claude Needham Lambert 
A.B., University of Utah, 1924 

John Augustus Larson 

A.B., Boston University, 1914 

A.M., ibid., 1915 

Ph.D., University of California, 1920 

Earl Oswel Latimer 

A.B., Hendrix College, 1923 
S.M., University of Chicago, 1925 

Arnold Leo Lieberman 

S.B., University of Chicago, 1924 

Axel Ludwig Lindberg 

A.B., University of North Dakota, 1925 
S.B., ibid., 1925 

William Otrey McLane 

S.B., University of North Dakota, 1925 

Edgar Stuart Mills 

S.B., University of Chicago, 1924 

John Benjamin Nanninga 

S.B., Kansas State Teachers College, 1921 
S.M., University of Chicago, 1925 

James Frank Pearcy 

S.B., University of Chicago, 1922 
Ph.D., ibid., 1924 

William Ernest Prescott, Jr. 

A.B., University of Alabama, 1923 
S.B., ibid., 1925 

Lucien Robert Pyle 

S.B., Kansas State Teachers College, 1922 

John Marion Radzinski St 

S.B., University of Chicago, 1923 



Albert Merritt Billings Hospital 

Cook County Hospital 

Los Angeles General Hospital, Los Angeles, 

California 
Presbyterian Hospital 

Illinois Central Hospital 

Roseland Community Hospital 

Grant Hospital 

Cook County Hospital 

German Evangelical Hospital 

U.S. Naval Hospital, Brooklyn, New York 

St. Luke's Hospital 

Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

St. Luke's Hospital 

Cook County Hospital 

Swedish Hospital, Seattle, Washington 

Illinois Central Hospital 

St. Francis Hospital, Evanston, Illinois 

Garfield Park Hospital 

Albert Merritt Billings Hospital 

Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan 

Garfield Park Hospital 

Mary of Nazareth Hospital 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOLS 



117 



John William Schauer 

S.B., University of North Dakota, 1923 
A.B., ibid., 1925 
S.M., ibid., 1925 

Paul Hilpert Smitgen 

A.B., Oberlin College, 1920 

Ernest Starr Watson 

S.B., University of Wisconsin, 1923 

Maxwell Tehiel Wolff 

Ph.B., Yale University, 1921 

John Paul Wood 

A.B., Baylor University, 1923 



Wesley Memorial Hospital 



Los Angeles General Hospital, 
California 



Los Angeles, 



Wesley Memorial Hospital 

Los Angeles General Hospital, Los Angeles, 

California 
U.S. Naval Hospital, Portsmouth, Virginia 



At the close of the Autumn Quarter, December 18, 1928: 

Presbyterian Hospital 



Martha Julia Bernheim 

S.B., University of Washington, 1921 

James Leonard Browning 

S.B., University of Chicago, 1925 

Mead Burke 

A.B., University of Wisconsin, 1917 

Coyne Herbert Campbell 

A.B., University of Oklahoma, 1924 



Illinois Central Hospital 

University of Illinois Research and Educational 

Hospital 
St. Mary of Nazareth Hospital 



Pvobert Menzo Eaton 

S.B., University of Chicago, 1924 

Edward Hasty Files 

S.B., University of Chicago, 1921 

Harry Theodore Glaser 

S.B., University of Chicago, 1925 

Robert Eastnor Johannesen 

S.B., University of Idaho, 1921 
J. Stanley Reifsneider 

S.B., Ursinus College, 1923 

Peter Albert Rosi 

S.B., University of Chicago, 1924 

Allan Sollman Shohet 

S.B., University of Chicago, 1925 

Maurice Weinrobe 

S.B., University of Chicago, 1925 

At the close of the Winter Quarter, March 19, 1929: 



Denver General Hospital, Denver, Colorado 
Albert Merritt Billings Hospital 
Norwegian-American Hospital 
Presbyterian Hospital 

Denver General Hospital, Denver, Colorado 
Cook County Hospital 
Cook County Hospital 
Michael Reese Hospital 



Bernard Oliver Amberson 

S.B., University of Chicago, 1925 

Louisa Hemken Bacon 

S.B., University of Chicago, 1925 

Lewis Charles Benesh 

A B., University of South Dakota, 1925 
A.M., ibid., 1926 

Julius Blumenstock 

S.B., University of Chicago, 1922 
S.M., ibid., 1923 

Frank Maurice Boonstra 

A.B., University of Michigan, 1923 

Benjamin Isaac Brindley 

A.B., University of Wisconsin, 1925 

Stuyvesant Butler 

Ph.B., Yale University, 1924 

Bryan James Carder 

A.B., Salem College, 1924 

S.B., University of West Virginia, 1926 

Harold Julius Chapman 

S.B., University of Chicago, 1925 



St. Luke's Hospital 

Research, Department 

Medical College 
Ravenswood Hospital 



of Pathology, Rush 



Albert Merritt Billings Hospital 

St. Luke's Hospital 
St. Joseph's Hospital 
Presbyterian Hospital 
Hospital of St. Anthony de Padua 

Cook County Hospital 



118 



THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO 



Anson Luman Clark 

M.E.. Cornell University, 1914 
S.B., University of Illinois, 1926 

Edgar James Connelly 

A.B., Columbia College, 1924 
Kenneth George Cook 

A.B., Carthage College, 1923 

S.M., University of Illinois, 1924 

S.B., ibid., 1926 

Daniel Joseph Coyle 

S.B., University of Alabama, 1926 

James Harvey Crowder, Jr. 
A.B., Indiana University, 1925 
S.B., University of Chicago, 1927 

Clarence Edmund Crowley, Jr. 
S.B., University of Chicago, 1925 

Daniel Robert Cunningham 
S.B., Findlay College, 1926 

Harold Biggs Elliott 

S.B.. University of Chicago, 1925 

Hayward Ward Foy 

S.B., Davis & Elkins College, 1922 
S.B., University of West Virginia, 19 

Samuel August Freitag 

A.B., University of Wisconsin, 1925 

Paul Crump Giililand 

S.B., University of Alabama, 1926 

Theodore Herzl Goldman 

S.B., University of Chicago, 1925 

Thomas Price Hill 

S.B., University of Chicago, 1925 

Willard Stanley Holmes 

A.B., Queen's University, 1915 

Spencer Johnson 

S.B., University of Chicago, 1925 

Floyd Bernhard Kantzer 
A.B., Capital University, 1917 

Victor Levine 

S.B., University of Chicago, 1925 

Federico Marino Lontoc 

S.B., University of Chicago, 1925 

Edward Ralph McNair 

University of Wisconsin 

Theodore Voorhorst Oltman 
A.B., Park College, 1923 
A.M., University of Wisconsin, 1925 

James Norman O'Neill 

S.B., St. Louis University, 1926 

Glenn Bertram Patrick 

A.B., Morningside College, 1916 

Frank Ellsworth Peters 

S.B., Washington and Jefferson University, 

1924 
S.B., University of West Virginia, 1926 

Paul Daniel Reinertsen 

A.B., Augustana College, 1921 

Peter Monte Schunk 

S.B., University of North Dakota, 1924 
S.M., ibid., 1926 
A.B., ibid., 1926 



Samaritan Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

Cook County Hospital 
Illinois Central Hospital 

Los Angeles General Hospital, Los Angeles, 

California 
Cook County Hospital 

Washington Boulevard Hospital 
Evanston Hospital, Evanston, Illinois 
St. Luke's Hospital 
Hospital of St. Anthony de Padua 

Cook County Hospital 

Los Angeles General Hospital, Los Angeles, 

California 
Los Angeles General Hospital, Los Angeles, 

California 
Los Angeles General Hospital, Los Angeles, 

California 
Illinois Central Hospital 

St. Luke's Hospital 

Garfield Park Hospital 

Cook County Hospital 

Frances E. Willard Hospital 

Hospital, Grand 

Hospital, Los 



Blodgett Memorial 

Michigan 
Los Angeles General 

California 



Rapids, 
Angeles, 



St. Mary's Hospital, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 

Cook County Hospital 

Hospital of St. Anthony de Padua 

Lutheran Deaconess Hospital 
St. Elizabeth's Hospital 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOLS 



119 



Samuel Andrew Scuderi 

S.B., University of Chicago, 1925 

George Douglas Shaw 

S.B., University of Wisconsin, 1926 

Calvin Horner Short 

A.B., Williams College, 1924 

Agnar Tengel Smedal 

A.B., University of Wisconsin, 1926 

Frederic Storchheim 

S.B., University of Chicago, 1918 
S.M., ibid., 1921 

Myrtle Florence Sweimler 

S.B., University of Chicago, 1925 

James Wallace Tanner 

Ph.B., University of Chicago, 1924 

Andrew Taylor 

A.B., Park College, 1922 

Simeon Limjuco Teopaco 

S.B., University of Chicago, 1925 

Frederick Roy Thacker 

A.B., University of North Dakota, 1925 
S.B., ibid., 1926 

Ferris Wilson Thompson 

A.B.. University of Southern California, 
1925 

Raymond Eugene Tyvand 

A.B., University of North Dakota, 1923 
S.B., ibid., 1926 

Paul Herbert VanVerst 

S.B., University of Wisconsin, 1926 

Oliver Earl Veneklasen 
A.B., Hope College, 1924 

Beulah Leon Wallin 

A.B., University of Washington, 1922 

Holland Williamson 

A.B., Swarthmore College, 1924 

Parke Harold Woodard 

A.B., University of Kansas, 1918 
A.M., ibid., 1925 

Max C. Zapler 

S.B., University of Chicago, 1914 



Los Angeles General Hospital, Los Angeles, 

California 
Butterworth Hospital, Grand Rapids, Michigan 

St. Joseph's Hospital 

Los Angeles General Hospital, Los Angeles, 
California 

Research and Educational Hospital of the Uni- 
versity of Illinois 

Chicago Memorial Hospital 

Cook County Hospital 

Hartford Hospital, Hartford, Connecticut 

Cook County Hospital 

West Suburban Hospital, Oak Park, Illinois 

U.S. Naval Hospital, San Diego, California 

Washington Boulevard Hospital 

Washington Boulevard Hospital 

Norwegian-American Hospital 

Illinois Masonic Hospital 

St. Luke's Hospital 

Denver General Hospital, Denver, Colorado 

St. Francis Hospital, Evanston, Illinois 



At the close of the Spring Quarter, June 11, 1929: 

Evangelical Hospital 



Gordon Wells Abbott 

A.B., University of Wisconsin, 1925 

Stanley Charles Anderson 
A.B., University of Utah, 1923 

Herman Beuker 

A.B., Hope College, 1922 

S.M., University of Illinois, 1924 

Henry Patrick Bourke 

S.B., University of Chicago, 1925 

Roy Ernest Brackin 

S.B., University of Chicago, 1925 

Theodore George Braun 

S.B., University of South Dakota, 1926 

John Isaac Brewer 

S.B., University of Chicago, 1925 

Eugene Michael Copps 

S.B., University of Chicago, 1923 



Hollywood Hospital, Los Angeles, California 
Butterworth Hospital, Grand Rapids, Michigan 

Wesley Hospital, Wichita, Kansas 

Presbyterian Hospital 

Milwaukee Hospital, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 

St. Luke's Hospital 

St. Luke's Hospital, Spokane, Washington 



120 



THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO 



Herbert William Dasse 

S.B., University of Chicago, 1925 

John Wesley Deyton 

A.B., University of North Carolina, 1926 

Carlisle Dietrich 

University of Wisconsin 

Joseph Niles Epstein 

A.B., University of North Carolina, 1926 

Arthur Newton Ferguson 

S.B., University of Chicago, 1923 

S.M., ibid., 1925 

Ph.D., Northwestern University, 1927 



John Ralph Finkle 

University of North Dakota, 



A.B. 

S.M., ibid., 1926 

Clifford Cannon Fulton 

A.B., University of Oklahoma, 



1923 



1924 



S.B., ibid., 1926 

Carl Burkhart Geiger 

A.B., Ohio University, 1925 

Jack Goldstein 

S.B., University of Chicago, 1925 

Otto Earle Gray 

S.B., University of Chicago, 1925 

Charles Oscar Harris 

S.B., University of Chicago, 1925 

Howard Jesse Hartman 

S.B., University of Chicago, 1925 

Robert Kornitzer Hilton 

S.B., University of Chicago, 1926 

Clayton Findeis Hogeboom 

A.B., University of South Dakota, 1925 
S.B., ibid., 1926 

Albert Joseph Holzman 

Ph.G., South Dakota State College, 1916 
A.B., University of South Dakota, 1923 
A.M., University of Denver, 1926 

Marque Lesslie Jackson 

SB., University of Chicago, 1925 

Ralph Earl Jones 

S.B., University of Wisconsin, 1925 
S.M., ibid., 1926 

Thomas Duane Jones 

A.B., University of Michigan, 1924 
S.B., Loyola University, 1926 

Dorothy Estelle Koch 

S.B., University of Chicago, 1925 

Fred Joseph Kraus 

S.B., University of Chicago, 1925 

Merwin Ottis Lanam 

A.B., Washburn College, 1921 

A.M., University of South Dakota, 1926 

Roy Milton Langdon 

S.B., University of Chicago, 1925 

Robert Watson Lennon 

S.B., University of Chicago, 1925 

Samuel Luber 

A.B., George Washington University, 1924 



California Lutheran Hospital, Los Angeles, 

California 
Norwegian-American Hospital 

Good Samaritan Hospital, Portland, Oregon 

Jewish Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

Cook County Hospital 

Norwegian-American Hospital 

Cook County Hospital 

Toledo Hospital, Toledo, Ohio 
Michael Reese Hospital 



San Francisco Hospital, San Francisco, 

fornia 
Cook County Hospital 



Cali- 



Los Angeles General Hospital, Los Angeles, 

California 
St. Francis Hospital, Evanston, Illinois 

Washington Boulevard Hospital 

St. Francis Hospital, Santa Barbara, California 

Cook County Hospital 
Roseland Community Hospital 

Garfield Park Hospital 



Verne Miles Mantle 

A.B., Occidental College, 



1925 



New Rochelle Hospital, New Rochelle, New 

York 
Cook County Hospital 

Evangelical Hospital 

Roseland Community Hospital 

Cook County Hospital 

Garfield Memorial Hospital, Washington, D.C. 

Hollywood Hospital, Los Angeles, California 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOLS 



121 



Hiram Dunlap Moor 

A.B., Middlebury College, 1911 
S.M., University of Vermont, 1919 
S.B., University of Oklahoma, 1925 

Melvin Allen Mulvania 

A.B., William Jewell College, 1925 
S.B., University of Missouri, 1926 

Jonathan Halsted Murray 

S.B., Otterbein College, 1922 

Barclay Elijah Noble 

S.B', Iowa State College, 1922 

Edwin Hardy Ober 

S.B., Dartmouth College, 1925 

Fred Owen Priest 

A.B., Baylor University, 1924 

William Joseph Quick 

S.B., University of Chicago, 1924 

Jack Irving Rabens 

S.B., University of Chicago, 1925 

Milton Parke Ream 

A.B., University of Utah, 1925 

Gilbert Joseph Rich 

A.B., Cornell University, 1915 
A.M., ibid., 1915 
Ph.D., ibid., 1917 

George William Ritteman 

A.B., University of North Dakota, 1925 
S.B., ibid., 1926 

Vernon Wagner Schick 

S.B., University of Chicago, 1925 

Ralph Horace Scull 

S.B., Wilberforce University, 1922 
S.B., University of Chicago, 1924 

Sylvan William Simon 

S.B., University of Chicago, 1924 
S.M., ibid., 1926 

Joseph Jennings Harrison Smith 
A.B., University of Pennsylvania, 1923 

Daniel Lytle Stormont 
A.B., Geneva College, 1921 
Ph.D., University of Chicago, 1925 

Alva Claude Surber, Jr. 

A.B., Harvard University. 1923 

Pat Alexander Tuckwiller 

S.B., University of West Virginia, 1926 

David Alexander Watkins 

A.B., University of West Virginia, 1926 
S.B., ibid., 1927 

Walter Ronald Werelius 

E.M., Montana State School, 1921 

John Allen Wilson 

A.B., Ripon College, 1922 

A.M., University of Wisconsin, 1924 

Ph.D., ibid., 1927 

Harry Winkler 

S.B., University of Chicago, 1921 

Harold Wolfson 

S.B., University of Chicago, 1925 
S.M., ibid., 1926 



University Hospital, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 

Nebraska Methodist Hospital, Omaha, Nebraska 

Cook County Hospital 

Pottenger Sanatorium, Monrovia, California 

Buffalo General Hospital, Buffalo, New York 

Garfield Park Hospital 

West Suburban Hospital, Oak Park, Illinois 

Mount Sinai Hospital 

Highland Hospital, Oakland, California 

Bellevue Hospital, New York City, New York 

Good Samaritan Hospital, Portland, Oregon 

Evangelical Hospital 

Old City Hospital, Kansas City, Missouri 

Michael Reese Hospital 



Los Angeles General Hospital, Los Angeles, 

California 
Presbyterian Hospital 



U.S. Naval Hospital, Brooklyn, New York 

Presbyterian Hospital 

Hospital of St. Anthony de Padua 



Highland Park Hospital, Highland Park, 
Illinois 

Ancker Hospital, St. Paul, Minnesota 



Cook County Hospital 
Mount Sinai Hospital 



122 



THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO 



The following students received certificates on the completion of the four years 
of the Medical Course at the close of the Summer Quarter, August 31, 1928: 



William Richard Abbott 

A.B., University of Utah, 1926 

Clarence Earl Baeumle 

S.B., University of Chicago, 1925 

James Simon Peter Beck 

S.B., University of Alabama, 1924 

Leonard Cardon 

S.B., University of Chicago, 1925 

Job Thigpen Cater 

A.B., University of Alabama, 1922 

William Sze Hsin Chow 

S.B., University of Chicago, 1925 

Morgan Allan Durham 

A.B., University of Denver, 1924 

Henry Arthur Greenebaum 

S.B., University of Chicago, 1924 

Daniel Louis Hirsch 

S.B., University of Chicago, 1923 

Jack LaVergne Kinsey 

S.B., University of Chicago, 1928 

Austin Philip Lewis 

S.B., University of Chicago, 1925 

Robert Mowatt Muirhead 

S.B., University of Saskatchewan, 1922 

Francis Walthour Porro 

S.B., Georgia School of Technology, 1921 
S.B., University of Chicago, 1926 

Paul Henry Reed 

S.B., University of Idaho, 1923 

Rodney Staples Starkweather 
A.B., Dartmouth College, 1924 

Donald Wright Thorup 
A.B., Grinnell College, 1924 

George Earle Wakerlin 

S.B., University of Chicago, 1923 

Ph.D., ibid., 1926 

S.M., University of Wisconsin, 1924 

Alexander Wolf 

S.B., University of Chicago, 1922 



Garfield Park Hospital 

St. Luke's Hospital 

Presbyterian Hospital, New York City, N.Y. 

Cook County Hospital 

Chicago Memorial Hospital 

St. Margaret's Hospital, Hammond, Indiana 

Colorado General Hospital, Denver, Colorado 

Michael Reese Hospital 

Albert Merrit Billings Hospital 

Milwaukee Hospital, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 

Illinois Central Hospital 

Chicago Lying-in Hospital 

Highland Park Hospital, Highland Park, 
Illinois 

Garfield Park Hospital 

Presbyterian Hospital 

Evangelical Hospital 

Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Cook County Hospital 



At the close of the Autumn Quarter, December 18, 1928: 



Ralph Wesley Beardsley 

S.B., University of Chicago, 1926 

Frederick Robert Bennett 

S.B., University of Chicago, 1925 

LeRoy Henry Berard 

Ph.B., University of Chicago, 1919 
A.M., ibid., 1920 

Mortimer Diamond 

S.B., University of Chicago, 1926 

William Carter Fairbrother 

A.B., University of North Dakota, 1924 
S.B., ibid., 1927 

Lewis Joseph Ferrell 

S.B., Montana State College, 1924 

Grace Hiller 

A.B., Smith College, 1920 

Frank Holt 

S.B., South Dakota State School of Mines, 
1924 



Presbyterian Hospital 
Roseland Community Hospital 
Cook County Hospital 

Denver General Hospital, Denver, Colorado 

Seattle General Hospital, Seattle, Washington 

Albert Merritt Billings Hospital 

Denver General Hospital, Denver, Colorado 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOLS 



123 



Carl August Johnson 

S.B., University of Chicago, 1925 

Albert Chandler Johnston 

S.B., University of Chicago, 1925 

Robert Charles Levy 

S.B., University of Chicago, 1926 

Warren Bond Matthews 

A.B., Emory University, 1923 
M.S., ibid., 1924 

Louis James Needels 

A.B., University of Missouri, 1925 
A.M., ibid., 1926 

Philip Cornelius Noble 

S.B., Northern State Teacher's College 

1923 
S.B., University of South Dakota, 1927 

Mildred Eva Nordlund 

S.B., University of Chicago, 1926 

Alfred Musgrave Paisley 

S.B., University of Chicago, 1926 

Mandel Lawrence Spivek 

S.B., University of Chicago, 1925 

Frederick Renfroe Weedon 
S.B., University of Florida, 1921 
S.M., ibid., 1923 



St. Luke's Hospital 

Maine General Hospital, Portland, Maine 

Michael Reese Hospital 

Presbyterian Hospital 

Presbyterian Hospital 

Murray Hospital, Butte, Montana 

Swedish Covenant Hospital 
Mercy Hospital 
Michael Reese Hospital 
Macon Hospital, Macon, Georgia 



At the close of the Winter Quarter, March 19, 1929: 



Albert Abelson 

A.B., Columbia University, 1925 

Oswald Nickoly Andersen 

A.B., University of Wisconsin, 1926 

Edward Nicholas Anderson 

S.B., Notre Dame University, 1922 

Wease Lee Ashworth 

A.B., West Virginia University, 1925 
S.B., ibid., 1927 

M. Meredith Baumgartner 
A.B., Wittenberg College, 1923 

Otis Otto Benson, Jr. 

A.B., University of Montana, 1924 
M.S., University of Iowa, 1925 

Samuel Berger 

S.B., University of Chicago, 1925 

Anne Lucille Brady 

A.B., University of Wisconsin, 1926 

Harry Brandman 

S.B., University of Chicago, 1925 

Emmet Michael Brown 

A.B., College of St. Thomas, 1916 
S.B., University of North Dakota, 1927 

Stanley Schaefer Bruechert 

A.B., State University of Iowa, 1925 

Harry Bunyan Burr 

A.B., Baylor University, 1924 

William Holton Cartmell 

A.B., University of Kentucky, 1925 

Peter F. Coleman 

S.B., College of the City of New York, 1925 
Helen Lucile Crawford Los Angeles 

A.B., University of Illinois, 1915 California 

Columbia University, 1922 



New York City Hospital, New York City, New 

York 
Methodist Hospital, Madison, Wisconsin 



Hospital of St. Anthony de Padua 



Presbyterian Hospital 
Presbyterian Hospital 

Michael Reese Hospital 



Roseland Community Hospital 

Los Angeles General Hospital, Los Angeles, 

California 
Presbyterian Hospital 

Illinois Central Hospital 

Cook County Hospital 

General Hospital, Los Angeles, 



M.A., 

Edwin J. DeCosta 

S.B., University of Chicago, 



1926 



Cook County Hospital 



124 



THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO 



Daniel DeVries 

A.B., Calvin College, 1925 

Peter Alexander Duehr 

A.B., University of Wisconsin, 1926 
A.M., ibid., 1927 

Leon Sidney Eagleburger 

S.B., University of Wisconsin, 1927 

James Cornelius Pass Fearrington 
A.B., University of North Carolina, 1925 

John Wesley Foster 

A.B., University of North Carolina, 1919 
LL.B., ibid., 1923 

Luke Wright Frame 

S.B., in Agr., West Virginia University, 

1924 
S.B., ibid., 1927 

Robert Richard Freund 

A.B., DePauw University, 1925 

Wayne Gordon 
' A.B., Franklin College, 1925 

Gilbert Otto Gronhovd 

A.B., Concordia College, 1923 

S.B., University of North Dakota, 1927 

Clifford O. Haugen 

A.B. University of North Dakota, 1926 
M.S., ibid., 1927 

William Samuel Hoffman 

A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 1918 
Ph.D., ibid., 1922 

Ben Lewis Hurwitz 

A.B., University of Wisconsin, 1926 

Fred Rife Isaacs 

A.B., University of Kansas, 1924 
A.M., ibid., 1925 

Richard Leos Jenkins 

A.B., Stanford University, 1925 

Roy Kegerreis 

M.E., in E.E., Ohio State University, 1911 
A.M., Harvard University, 1916 

Joseph Raymond Kenney 

S.B., West Virginia University, 1927 

Stanley Guy Law 

A.B., Northland College, 1924 

Norbert Frederick Leckband 
B.D., Concordia Seminary, 1924 

Ralph Emerson Jenkins LeMaster 
A.B .DePauw University, 1924 

James Joseph Lutz 

A.B., University of Iowa, 1926 

Sarah Elizabeth McFetridge 
A.B., Muskingum College, 1924 
S.B., West Virginia University, 1927 

Evelyn Gruhlke McLane 

A.B., Hamline University, 1925 

John Paul Medelman 

A.B., University of North Dakota, 1925 
S.B., ibid., 1927 

Frank Lionel Menehan 

S.B., Kansas State Teachers' College, 1922 

Benjamin Harold Neiman 

S.B., University of Chicago, 1926 



Harper Hospital, Detroit, Michigan 

Wisconsin General Hospital, Madison, Wisconsin 



Milwaukee County Hospital, Wauwatosa, Wis- 
consin 



Wesley Memorial Hospital 
Presbyterian Hospital 



Ohio Valley General Hospital, Wheeling, West 
Virginia 



Lutheran Deaconess Hospital 

Municipal Contagious Disease Hospital and 
Presbyterian Hospital 

Los Angeles General Hospital, Los Angeles, 
California 

Aurora Hospital, Aurora, Illinois 

Cook County Hospital 

Hospital, McKeesport, Pennsyl- 
Garfield Park Hospital 



McKeesport 
vania 



University of Illinois Research and Educational 

Hospital 
Evanston Hospital, Evanston, Illinois 

Charleston General Hospital, Charleston, West 

Virginia 
Aurora Hospital, Aurora, Illinois 

Wesley Memorial Hospital 



Presbyterian Hospital and Swedish Covenant 
Hospital 

New Asbury Hospital, Minneapolis, Minnesota 

Presbyterian Hospital, Chicago, and Ancker 
Hospital, St. Paul, Minnesota 

Cook County Hospital 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOLS 



125 



Franklin Jesse Nelson 

A.B., Baker University, 1917 

Harry William Newman 

A.B., University of Utah, 1922 

Elmer Thomas Noall 

S.B., University of Utah, 1917 

Ernest Sivereen Olson 
S.B., Beloit College, 1925 

Rudolf Osgood 

S.B., Harvard University, 1924 

Harry McKay Pier 

S.B., University of Wisconsin, 1922 

Russell Edward Pleune 
A.B., Hope College, 1925 

Saul Kenneth Pollack 

A.B., University of Wisconsin, 1926 

Philip Preiser 

A.B., West Virginia University, 1925 
S.B., ibid., 1927 

Ferdinand Francis Schwartz 

A.B., West Virginia University, 1925 
S.B., ibid., 1927 

Harry Shapiro 

A.B., University of Wisconsin, 1926 

Ruth Sisson 

A.B., Brown University, 1915 

Reginald Hughes Smart 

A.B., University of North Dakota, 1925 
S.B., ibid., 1927 

John Clinton Smiley 

A.B. (cum laude), University of South Da- 
kota. 1926 
S.B., ibid., 1927 

James Gibson Smith, Jr. 

A.B., Washington and Lee University, 
1925 

Frank Curtis Spencer 

B.B.A., University of Washington, 1922 

Ernest Lyman Stebbins 

S.B., Dartmouth College, 1926 

Ludwig Henry Otto Stobbe 

A.B., University of Utah, 1921 
M.A., ibid., 1927 

Milton Franklin Stuessy 

A.B., North Western College, 1925 
M.A., University of Wisconsin, 1927 

Jay Eugene Tremaine 

S.B., Dartmouth College, 1924 

Samuel Wick 

A.B., University of Wisconsin, 1926 

Milton Wolpert 

A.B., West Virginia University, 1926 
S.B., ibid., 1927 

Willard Leo Wood 

A.B., Indiana State Normal College, 1920 
M.S., University of Chicago, 1925 

Leroy William Yolton 

S.B., Illinois Wesleyan University, 1921 
M.A., Harvard University, 1923 



Cook County Hospital 

San Francisco Hospital, San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia 



Peter Bent Brigham Hospital, Boston, Massa- 
chusetts 

San Francisco Hospital, San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia 

Washington Boulevard Hospital 



Charleston General Hospital, Charleston, West 
Virginia, and St. Louis City Hospital, St. 
Louis, Missouri 

McKeesport Hospital, McKeesport, Pennsyl- 
vania 

Milwaukee Children's Hospital and Mount 
Sinai Hospital, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 

San Francisco Hospital, San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia 

Los Angeles General Hospital, Los Angeles, 
California 

St. Luke's Hospital 

Chicago Memorial Hospital 

Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan 

Latter-Day Saints Hospital, Salt Lake City, 
Utah 

Norwegian-American Hospital 
St. Luke's Hospital 



Los Angeles General Hospital, Los Angeles, 
California 

Presbyterian Hospital 



126 



THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO 



At the close of the Spring Quarter, 1929: 



Charles Baron 

S.B., Beloit College, 1925 

Lambertus Eugene Beeuwkes 
S.B., Michigan State College, 1925 

Leonidas Harris Berry 

S.B., University of Chicago, 1925 

Arthur Ralph Bryant 

A.B., Grinnell College, 1925 

Hildahl Ingbert Burtness 
A.B., St. Olaf College, 1925 

Ruth Renter Darrow 

A.B., Western Reserve University, 1918 

James Wallace Duncan 

S.B., North Dakota Agr. College, 1924 

Benjamin Bay lis Earle 

A.B., Baylor University, 1925 

Leo Alexander Elkourie 

S.B., University of Alabama, 1926 
M.S., ibid., 1927 

Kinsey Ourant English 
A.B., Ohio University, 1923 
S.B., West Virginia University, 1927 

Kenneth Patton Evans 

A.B., University of Alabama, 1925 
S.B., ibid., 1927 

Ralph Alton Ferguson 

A.B., University of California, 1924 
S.B., University of North Dakota, 1927 

Ralph Homer Fouser 

D.D.S., Northwestern University, 1911 
S.B., Lewis Institute, 1925 

Herbert Bothwell Gaston 
A.B., Kansas University, 1925 

Martin Francis Gaynor 

A.B., Holy Cross College, 1924 

Aubrey Louis Goodman 

S.B., University of Chicago, 1925 

Harold Birger Hanson 

A.B., Augustana College, 1925 

Earl Clifford Henrikson 

A.B., University of .Minnesota, 1926 
S.B., ibid., 1927 

Merlyn George Henry 

A.B., University of Wisconsin, 1926 
M.S., ibid., 1927 

Maurice James Hoilien 

A.B., University of South Dakota, 1926 
S.B., ibid., 1927 

Maurice L. Jones 

A.B., University of Kansas, 1924 
S.B., ibid., 1927 

Francis Vincent Kowals 

S.B., University of Notre Dame, 1925 

James Alexander Laird 

S.B., University of Wisconsin, 1915 

Charles Lynville Leppert 

A.B., West Virginia University, 1925 
S.B., ibid., 1927 

Wilfred Francis Lowe 

A.B., University of North Dakota, 1926 
S.B., ibid., 1927 



Mount Sinai Hospital 

Harper Hospital, Detroit, Michigan 

Freedman's Hospital, Washington, D.C. 

St. Luke's Hospital 

Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital, Santa Barbara, 

California 
Michael Reese Hospital 

Ancker Hospital, St. Paul, Minnesota 

Wesley Memorial Hospital 



West Suburban Hospital, Oak Park, Illinois 
Grady Hospital, Atlanta, Georgia 



California Lutheran Hospital, Los Angeles, 
California 

Presbyterian Hospital 



Harper Hospital, Detroit, Michigan 
Hartford Hospital, Hartford, Connecticut 
Michael Reese Hospital 
St. Luke's Hospital 
St. Luke's Hospital 



Los Angeles General Hospital, Los Angeles, 
California 



St. Luke's Hospital, Kansas City, Missouri 

Harper Hospital, Detroit, Michigan 
Roseland Community Hospital 



San Francisco Hospital, San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOLS 



127 



John Arthur Lund 

A.B., St. Olaf College, 1923 

S.B., University of North Dakota, 1927 

Leo John McGuire 

S.B., University of Wisconsin, 1928 

Myron Gilmartin Means 

S.B., Illinois Wesleyan University, 1926 

Harold Lyner Miller 

S.B., University of Wisconsin, 1927 

Robert Fisher Monteith 
S.B., Coe College, 1925 

Traugott Herman Nammacher 
A.B., University of Wisconsin, 1926 
M.A., ibid., 1927 

Clement Francis Neacy 

S.B., Colgate University, 1924 

Michael Peter Ohlsen 

S.B., University of Wisconsin, 1929 

Archibald Oscar Olson 

S.B-, University of North Dakota, 1927 

George Louis Perusse, Jr. 

S.B., University of Chicago, 1925 
M.S., ibid., 1927 

Theodore Stanley Proud 

A.B., DePauw University, 1921 

Leslie Alonzo Purifoy 

A.B., University of Arkansas, 1926 

Herbert Arnold Sheen 

S.B., University of Chicago, 1924 

Hall Ivan Sippy 

S.B., University of Chicago, 1921 

Merle E. Sweeley 

A.B., University of South Dakota, 1925 
S.B., ibid., 1927 

James Harvey Teusink 

A.B., Hope College, 1925 
Louring William Vore 

A.B., Manchester College, 1925 

Harold C. Voris 

A.B., Hanover College, 1923 

James Ignatius Wargin 

S.B., University of Notre Dame, 1925 

Lawrence Arthur Williams 

S.B., University of Chicago, 1926 
M.S., ibid., 1927 



Washington Boulevard Hospital 



Presbyterian Hospital 



Southern Pacific Hospital, San Francisco, 

California 
Lutheran Deaconess Hospital 



Milwaukee Hospital, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 
Madison General Hospital, Madison, Wisconsin 
Ancker Hospital, St. Paul, Minnesota 

Norwegian American Hospital 

Michael Reese Hospital 

St. Louis City Hospital, 112, St. Louis, Missouri 

Washington Boulevard Hospital 

St. Joseph Hospital 

Butterworth Hospital, Grand Rapids, Michigan 
Norwegian American Hospital 
Cook County Hospital 



128 



THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO 



DEGREES OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY IN THE MEDICAL 

SCIENCES CONFERRED IN THE SPRING, SUMMER, 

AUTUMN, AND WINTER QUARTERS, 1928-29 



John Hays Bailey 
Janet MacFarlane Bourn 
Samuel Brody 
Graeme Alexander Canning 
George Russell Crisler 
Charles Eiseman 
Maurice Harold Friedman 
Henry Nelson Harkins 
Harald Groth Oxholm Hoick 
Yu Tao Loo 
John Austin Moran 
Maurice Harrison Seevers 
Charles Spurgeon Smith 
Ralph Grafton Smith 
Ellen Stewart 
Eugene Updyke Still 
Kathleen Sullivan Still 
Adah Elizabeth Verder 
John Yesair 



Anatomy 

Hygiene and Bacteriology 

Physiological Chemistry 

Physiological Chemistry 

Physiology 

Physiology 

Physiology 

Medicine 

Physiology 

Anatomy 

Hygiene and Bacteriology 

Physiological Chemistry and Pharmacology 

Physiology , 

Physiological Chemistry and Pharmacology 

Physiology 

Physiological Chemistry and Pharmacology 

Physiology 

Hygiene and Bacteriology 

Hygiene and Bacteriology 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOLS 129 

LIST OF STUDENTS 

GRADUATE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE OF THE OGDEN 

GRADUATE SCHOOL OF SCIENCE 

The following list includes only those students who were in attendance during one 
or more quarters, and who were entitled to take the quarterly examinations. 

Note. — The naming of a degree not followed by the name of an institution in parenthesis is under- 
stood to mean a degree conferred at the University of Chicago. 

Where no institution is named, it is understood to mean that the student began his college career at 
the University of Chicago. 

Where no state is mentioned, Illinois is understood. 

Abbreviations. — U.= University; C.=College; S. = School; Inst. — Institute (or Institution). 

Period of Residence. — s = Resident during Summer Quarter, 1928; <z = Resident during Autumn 
Quarter, 1928; w = Resident during Winter Quarter, 1929; s£=Resident during Spring Quarter, 1929. 

MATRICULATES FOR 1928-29, FIRST, SECOND, AND THIRD YEARS 

Ackerman, Walter, a, w, sp, Sharon, Pa. A.B. (U. of Pittsburgh) '28. 

Adelman, Alex, s, a, w, Trenton, N.J. A.B. (U. of Pennsylvania) '27. 

Alexander, Cornelius Allen, s, Chicago. A.B. (Fisk U.) '23. 

Armstrong, Thomas D., a, w, sp, Chicago. Ph.B. '28. 

Baer, Raymond Bernhard, s, a, w, sp, Toledo, Ohio. A.B. (Penn State C.) '22. 

Bagnulo, Anthony, s, Chicago. S.B. '27. 

Bain, J. Herbert, w, sp, New Concord, Ohio. A.B. (Muskingum C.) '28. 

Baker, Marshall, a, w, sp, Chicago. S.B. '27. 

Baldwin, Robert Sherman, a, w, sp, Escanaba, Mich. S.B. '27. 

Barnard, Robert Dane, a, sp, Chicago. S.B. '27. 

Barron, Louis Edward, a, w, sp, Cambridge, Mass. A.B. (Harvard C.) '28. 

Barry, William Earl, w, sp, Hays, Kan. B.S. (Kansas State Teachers C.) '26. 

Baumrucker, George Otto, s, a, w, sp, River Forest. S.B. '27. 

Bay, Maturim Ballou, a, w, Chicago. S.B. '28. 

Belinkoff, Julius, s, Jersey City, N.J. B.A. (Johns Hopkins) '25. 

Benjamin, Harry Weston, s, Mitchell, S.D. A.B. (U. of Nebraska) '24. 

Bennett, Arthur Lawrence, a, w, sp, Oshkosh, Wis. A.B. (Lawrence C.) '27. 

Bennett, John Charles, s, a, w, Charles City, Iowa. M.S. (U. of Iowa) '24. 

Benson, Reuben Alexander, a, w, sp, Brookings, S.D. A.B. (St. Olaf C.) '26. 

Berkhout, Peter Gerrit, s, a, w, sp, Grand Rapids, Mich. M.S. (U. of Michigan) '25. 

Berlin, Joseph, a, w, sp, Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. (U. of Pittsburgh) '28. 

Bernstein, Samuel Sidney, a, w, sp, Detroit, Mich. B.A. (Johns Hopkins) '27. 

Beskow, Richard, w, sp, Hillsboro, Tex. A.B. (Trinity U.) '28. 

Bland, Leland James, a, w, sp, Vandalia, Mo. A.B. (U. of Missouri) '28. 

Bleiweiss, Irving Jerome, s, a, w, Cleveland, Ohio. B.A. (U. of Michigan) '27. 

Blier, Zachary Abraham, s, a, w, sp, Chicago. S.B. '27. 

Bodansky, Meyer, s, Galveston, Tex. Ph.D. (Cornell U.) '23. 

Boder, Elena, a, w, sp, Chicago. S.B. '27. 

Bond, Floyd Melbourne, a, w, sp, Oberlin, Ohio. A.B. (Oberlin C.) '27. 

Braudwell, Leslie Jarrett, s, a, w, sp, Wendell, N.C. B.A. (Trinity C.) '21. 

Brink, James Russell, a, w, sp, Hamilton, Mich. A.B. (Hope C.) '28. 

Broder, Samuel B., w, sp, Kieff, Russia. B.A. (U. of Pennsylvania) '26. 

Burgdorf, Alfred Louis, a, w, sp, Meriden, Conn. S.B. '27. 

Burkwall, Herman Fuson, s, Canton, China. A.B. (Park C.) '25. 



130 THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO 

Burns, Malcolm Owen, a, w, Somers, Mont. B.S. (U. of Washington) '25. 

Caskey, Elmer Gray, a, w, sp, Mahoningtown, Pa. B.S. (Geneva C.) '27. 

Chamberlain, Beulah, s, a, w, sp, Chicago. B.A. (Yankton C.) '20. 

Chan, Ying, Tak, a, w, sp, Canton, China. B.A. (Oberlin C.) '27. 

Changnon, Eugene Almar, a, w, sp, Kankakee. S.B. '28. 

Childs, Alice, a, w, sp, Waxahachie, Tex. B.S. (Trinity U.) '24. 

Cohen, George Charles, sp, Chicago. S.B. '28. 

Cohen, Hardin Edward, s, Chicago. S.B. '26. 

Cohen, Irving M., w, sp, Bangor, Mich. A.B. (Kalamazoo C.) '27. 

Connell, Isee Lee, s, a, w, Davenport, Iowa. A.B. (Howard C.) '20. 

Cook, Donald D., a, w, sp, Portland, Ore. A.B. (U. of S. Calif.) '27. 

Corrigan, Marion, s, a, w, Chicago. S.B. '22. 

Cowen, Jack Posner, a, w, sp, Chicago. S.B. '27. 

Crawford, Robert Roe, a, w, sp, Akron, Ohio. A.B. (Oberlin C.) '27. 

Crisler, George Russell, sp, Normal. S.B. '24; Ph.D. '28. 

Czaja, Zenon George, s, a, w, sp, Detroit, Mich. A.B. (U. of Michigan) '27. 

Dack, Gail Monroe, s, a, w, sp, Chicago. Ph.D. '27. 

Danielson, Lennox, s, Litchfield, Minn. B.A. (U. of Pennsylvania) '25. 

Danielson, Martha, w, sp, Litchfield, Minn. B.A. (Carleton C.) '28. 

Davis, Alexander Henry, a, w, sp, Chicago. S.B. '27. 

Davis, Chester, s, a, w, Chicago. A.B. (Butler C.) '18. 

Davis, John Wesley, a, w, sp, Glenns Ferry, Idaho. S.B. (U. of Idaho) '28. 

Day, Lois Amelia, s, a, w, sp, Huntsville, Mo. A.B. (U. of Missouri) '23. 

Denninger, Henri Stearns, a, w, sp, Chicago. S.B. '26. 

DeVenecia, German Abalos, a, Philippine Islands. B.A. (Johns Hopkins U.) '26. 

DeYoung, George Marion, s, a, w, Orange City, Iowa. M.A. (Princeton U.) '27. 

DeYoung, Vernon Richard, s, a, w, sp, Chicago. B.S. (Wheaton C.) '27. 

Dick, Alfred Carr, sp, River Forest. B.S. (Dartmouth C.) '27. 

Dieter, Clarence Dewey, s, Washington, Pa. M.S. (Washington & Jefferson C.) '24. 

Dolph, Ivar Eugene, a, w, sp, Akron, Iowa. S.B. (U. of S. Dakota) '28. 

Downing, Mary Elizabeth, s, a, w, sp, Chicago. S.B. '27. 

DuBois, Franklin Smith, s, Liberty, Indiana. B.A. (Wabash C.) '26. 

Eaton, Lealdes M., a, w, sp, Decatur. S.B. '27. 

Edelstein, Rudolph, s, Gary, Ind. S.B. '26. 

Edmondson, Hugh, s, Maysville, Ark. B.A. (U. of Oklahoma) '26. 

Eisenberg, George, s, a, w, sp, Waukegan. A.B. (U. of Illinois) '27. 

Elliott, Clarence Kilgore, a, w, sp, Wilber, Neb. B.A. (U. of Nebraska) '27. 

Erickson, Carl August, a, w, sp, Chicago. S.B. '28. 

Evans, Elwyn, a, w, sp, Dodgeville, Wis. B.S. (Lewis Inst.) '27. 

Feingold, David, a, w, sp, Bronx, N.Y. B.A. (Johns Hopkins U.) '28. 

Fell, Egbert Howard, s, a, w, sp, Holland, Mich. A.B. (Hope C.) '27. 

Filek, Allan, a, w, sp, Oak Park. S.B. '28. 

Finkel, Morris Donald, a, w, sp, Chicago. S.B. '27. 

Fishman, Jerome, a, w, sp, Chicago. S.B. '28. 

Fitzgibbon, Joseph Paul, s, a, w, sp, Sioux Falls, S.D. A.B. (Creighton U.) '26. 

Foster, Robert Henry King, s, a, w, sp, Cleveland, Ohio. B.C.E. (Ohio State U.) '23. 

Franing, Russell Lowell, j, a, Chicago. A.B. (Augustana C.) '23. 

Franzus, Edward Saul, s, a, w, Berwyn. S.B. '27. 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOLS 131 

Gabe, Sigmund, a, w, sp, Detroit, Mich. B.A. (C. of City of Detroit) '28. 

Geerlings, Lewis Jennings, a, w, sp, Fremont, Mich. A.B. (Hope C.) '28. 

Gersh, Isidore, a, w, sp, Brooklyn, N.Y. A.B. (Cornell U.) '28. 

Gilchrist, Richard Kennedy, s, Spearman, Tex. S.B. '26. 

Ginsberg, Julius Emanuel, s, a, w, sp, Chicago. S.B. '27. 

Glennie, Alexander Cowles, a, Grand Rapids, Mich. A.B. (Columbia U.) '16. 

Glynn, John Hubert, a, w, sp, Chicago. S.B. '28. 

Goldberg, Harry Charles, w, sp, Perth Amboy, N.J. B.S. (Rutgers U.) '28. 

Gordon, Francis Byron, a, w, sp, Fairbury. B.S. (Illinois Wesleyan U.) '27. 

Gordon, Irving Isidore, a, w, sp, Brooklyn, N.Y. M.A. (Cornell U.) '28. 

Gordon, Moses Wolff, a, w, sp, Brooklyn, N.Y. B.S. (C. of City of New York) '28. 

Graham, W. Eugene, s, a, w, sp, Allerton, Iowa. B.S. (Tarkio C.) '27. 

Green, Marion Fielding, a, w, sp, Levelland, Tex. A.B. (Texas Technological C.) '28. 

Greenwood, Hamilton Hill, a, w, sp, Mansfield, Wash. B.S. (State C. of Washington) 

'27. 
Greer, Frank Emmet, s, Chicago. M.S. (Kalamazoo C.) '21. 
Haber, Gene Burton, w, sp, Akron, Ohio. B.A. (Harvard C.) '28. 
Hand, John Gregg, s, Philadelphia, Pa. B.A. (Yale U.) '25. 
Harsh, George Frederick, s, a, sp, Garrett, Ind. A.B. (U. of Illinois) '22. 
Hart, Benjamin Franklin, sp, Burning Springs, Ky. A.B. (Eastern Kentucky State 

Teachers C.) '25. 
Hartman, Moses, sp, Cleveland, Ohio. M.A. (U. of Michigan) '28. 
Hauch, John Theodore, sp, Chicago. S.B. '29. 

Herman, William K., s, a, w, Lorain, Ohio. A.B. (U. of Pennsylvania) '27. 
Herron, Paul, s, Monroe, La. A.B. (U. of Nebraska) '26. 
Hinrichs, Marie Agnes, a, w, sp, Chicago. Ph.D. '23. 
Hodges, Dean Wesley, s, Chicago. S.B. '26. 
Hoeksema, Henry, a, w, sp, Chicago. S.B. '28. 
Hoerr, Normand Louis, a, sp, Peoria. A.B. (Johns Hopkins U.) '23. 
Holley, Sion, sp, Waco, Texas. B.A. (Baylor U.) '27. 

Hollister, Bruce A., s, a, w, sp, West Chicago. B.S. (Montana State C.) '23. 
Holton, Sylvia Gates, s, a, w, sp, Chicago. A.B. (Mt. Holyoke C.) '25. 
Howell, Llewellyn, a, w, Fargo, N.D. B.S. (North Dakota Agriculture C.) '26. 
Hughes, Clifford Milton, a, w, sp, Mitchell, S.D. B.S. (Dakota Wesleyan U.) '27. 
Jackola, Virginia, a, w, sp, Polo. B.S. (Rockford C.) '25. 
Jacobson, Moses Abraham, s, a, w, sp, Chicago. Ph.D. '27. 
Johnson, Andrew J., sp, Chicago. Ph.B. '28. 
Johnson, Arvid Theodore, s, a, w, sp, Chicago. S.B. '28. 

Johnson, Joseph Lealand, s, a, w, sp, Philadelphia, Pa. B.S. (Penn State C.) '19. 
Johnson, Philip O. C, a, w, sp, Watford City, N.D. A.B. (St. Olaf C.) '28. 
Johnston, Albert Chandler, s, Chicago. S.B. '25. 
Jones, Beatrice Olwen, s, Racine, Wis. M.A. (Columbia U.) '23. 
Jones, William Moses, a, w, sp, Detroit, Mich. B.A. (Fisk U.) '22. 
Jordan, Lucia Elizabeth, a, w, sp, Homewood. A.B. (Smith C.) '27. 
Josselyn, Livingston Eli, a, w, sp, Chicago. S.B. '27. 
Kane, Thomas Leiper, s, a, w, sp, Kane, Pa. B.S. '28. 
Kao, Philip Shuh-Chi, s, a, w, sp, Washington, D.C. S.B. '27. 
Karam, Harvey Alexander, a, w, sp, Akron, Ohio. B.S. (U. of Akron) '27. 



132 THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO 

Kaufman, Daniel Milton, s, Chicago. S.B. '26. 

Keith, John Johnston, a, w, sp, Chicago. B.A. (Amherst C.) '28. 

Kern, Keyne Ruth, a, w, sp, Chicago. M.S. '21. 

Kernwein, Graham A., a, w, Chicago. S.B. '26. 

Kistin, Albert David, a, w, sp, New York, N.Y. M.A. (Columbia U.) '28. 

Kistler, Gene Haviland, s, Royal Center, Ind. A.B. (Wabash C.) '26. 

Kitt, William Stanley, a, w, sp, Tucson, Ariz. B.S. (U. of Arizona) '27. 

Koerner, Clinton Sawyer Main, a, w, sp, Peoria. A.B. (Bradley Polytechnic Inst.) '28. 

Kolodny, Abraham, a, w, sp, New York, N.Y. B.S. (C. of the City of New York) '28. 

Kroeger, Hilda Hertha, s, a, w, sp, Tucson, Ariz. M.S. (U. of Illinois) '26. 

Laing, Donald Reid, sp, Iron Mountain, Mich. A.B. (U. of Michigan) '26. 

Laird, Don Roth, a, w, sp, Malvern, Iowa. B.A. (Grinnell C.) '28. 

Lawlah, Clyde Avery, s, Bessemer, Ala. B.S. (Morehouse C.) '25. 

Leich, Charles Francis, s, a, w, sp, Evansville, Ind. A.B. (Wabash C.) '27. 

Lerner, Benjamin, a, w, sp, Chicago. S.B. '28. 

Leserman, Lester Kaufman, a, w, Chicago. S.B. '27. 

Levin, Herbert Julian, a, w, sp, Paterson, N.J. B.S. (New York U.) '28. 

Lewison, Matthew Michael, s, a, w, Chicago. S.B. '27 

Li, Keh-Hung, s, Shanghai, China. B.S. (Shanghai C.) '25. 

Lipscomb, Thomas Herbert, s, a, w, sp, Jacksonville, Fla. A.B. (Transylvania C.) '26. 

Logan, Catharine Elizabeth, s, a, Monticello, Ind. A.B. (Lake Forest C.) '24. 

Long, Draper Lyon, w, sp, Mason City, Iowa. A.B. (Grinnell C.) '28. 

Lovett, James Poe, a, w, sp, Eastland, Tex. A.B. (Baylor U.) '27. 

Markee, Joseph Eldridge, s, a, w, sp, Neponset. S.B. '25. 

McAllister, Ralph Graham, a, w, sp, Waterman. B.S. (Monmouth C.) '26. 

McCarthy, John Daniel, s, a, w, Chicago. S.B. '27. 

McClelland, Preston Henkle, s, Decatur. B.A. (James Millikin U.) '21. 

McClure, George Morris, s, a, w, sp, Danville, Ky. A.B. (Centre C.) '27. 

McFadyen, Adelaide Margaret, s, a, w, Rockford. B.S. (Rockford C.) '26. 

McGrath, William Mayo, a, w, sp, Grand Island, Neb. A.B. (Grand Island C.) '27. 

Mclntyre, Archibald Ross, w, sp, Stockport, England. S.B. '27. 

McKinney, Roscoe Lewis, s, a, w, sp, Washington, D.C. B.S. (Bates C.) '21. 

McMullen, Thomas, w, sp, Tarkio, Mo. A.B. (Tarkio C.) '28. 

McRae, Louis Addison, Jr., a, w, sp, Albuquerque, N.M. A.B. (U. of New Mexico) '28. 

Merchant, Raymond, s, a, w, sp, Brook, Ind. Ph.D. (U. of Illinois) '28. 

Michel, Herbert Leon, s, a, w, Chicago. S.B. '28. 

Miessner, Alfred Dietrick, sp, Cleveland, Ohio. A.B. (Western Reserve U.) '28. 

Miller, Clemmy Olin, s, Hagerstown, Ind. Ph.D. '27. 

Miller, Samuel Lewis, s, Detroit, Mich. B.A. (U. of Michigan) '26. 

Mills, John Harold, sp, Chicago. A.B. (U. of Illinois) '24. 

Minnema, Clarence, s, Chicago. B.S. (Lewis Institute) '24. 

Mintz, Abraham, s, a, w, Scranton, Pa. B.S. (New York U.) '25. 

Mishkis, Benjamin, a, Chicago. S.B. '27. 

Mizuire, Shizuto, s, a, w, sp, Hawaii. B.S. (U. of Hawaii) '27. 

Moffatt, J. Stuart, s, Arpin, Wis. A.B. (Ripon C.) '25. 

Morris, Raymond LeGrand, s, a, w, Holland, Mich. A.B. (Kalamazoo C.) '26. 

Monroe, Clarence Lee Edward, sp, Philadelphia, Pa. M.S. (U. of Pennsylvania) '25. 

Monroe, Clarence Webster, w, sp, Ed wards ville. B.S. (Whitman C.) '28. 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOLS 133 

Mowrey, Fred Howenstine, s, a, w, sp, Los Angeles, Calif. B.S. (U. of S. Calif.) '27. 

Neasham, Ralph Alton, a, w, sp, West Newton, Pa. B.S. (Allegheny C.) '28. 

Newlove, Frank Elwood, s, Des Moines, Iowa. S.B. '26. 

Nelson, James August, sp, Begstone City, S.D. B.A. (U. of Minnesota) '16. 

Nicoll, George Lorimer, s, a, w, sp, Tarkio, Mo. B.S. (Tarkio C.) '26. 

Nishihara, Mitsuo, w, sp, Honolulu, Hawaii. A.B. (U. of Michigan) '28. 

Olson, Clarence, a, w, sp, Chicago. S.B. '28. 

Olson, Paul Frederick, s, Decorah, Iowa. B.A. (Luther C.) '26. 

Oslund, Robert, s, w, Chicago. Ph.D. '23. 

Pacheco, Guillernis Alfredo, sp, Bolivia, S. America. S.B. '28. 

Parks, Ross V., a, w, sp, Willow Creek, Mont. A.B. (U. of Montana) '26. 

Pascucelli, Thomas Joseph, a, Du, sp, Bridgeport, Conn. B.S. (Yale U.)'27. 

Paul, Tom Dickey, s, a, w, Wyoming, Ohio. S.B. '27. 

Peelen, John William, a, w, sp, Sioux Center, Iowa. A.B. (Hope C.) '27. 

Peelen, Matthew, a, w, sp, Sioux Center, Iowa. A.B. (Hope C.) '27. 

Pennington, Harry Caldwell, a, w, sp, Chicago. S.B. '27. 

Peterson, Paul Gilbert, s, a, w, Randall, Iowa. B.S. (St. Olaf C.) '27. 

Pike, William Winston, a, w, sp, New York, N.Y. B.S. (C. of City of New York) '27. 

Piatt, Alfred Jacob, a, w, sp, Chicago. S.B. '27. 

Poindexter, Samuel Marshall, s, Boise, Idaho. B.S. (U. of Idaho) '25. 

Poliak, Percy Perry, a, w, sp, Trinidad, Colo. B.A. (Colorado U.) '27. 

Poppen, James Leonard, s, Holland, Mich. A.B. (Hope C.) '26. 

Porter, Robert Trigg, a, w, sp, Rockford. S.B. '27. 

Probasco, John Leonard, a, w, sp, Bloomington. B.S. (Illinois Wesleyan U.) '28. 

Quigley, John Paul, s, a, w, sp, Chicago. M.S. (U. of Minnesota) '21. 

Quinn, Jeremiah, a, w, sp, Palos Park. S.B. '27. 

Rappaport, Joseph Nathan, s, a, w, Ottawa, Ohio. B.A. (Ohio State U.) '27. 

Redfern, William Westbrook, w, sp, Lansing, Mich. B.S. (Michigan State C.) '27. 

Regan, James Francis, w, sp, Miles City, Mont. A.B. (Columbia C.) '28. 

Rich, James Sears, a, w, sp, Chicago. S.B. '27. 

Richeson, Arthur K., a, w, sp, Granger, Tex. B.A. (Southwestern U.) '27. 

Ricketts, Henry Tubbs, s, Kirkwood. S.B. '24. 

Robertson, Sylvan H., s, a, w, Chicago. S.B. '27. 

Robey, Grace Lucille, s, a, w, sp, Frederick, Okla. M.S. '26. 

Rogers, Fred Terry, s, Dallas, Tex. Ph.D. '16. 

Rogers, John C, s, a, w, Henderson, Ky. Ph.D. '26. 

Root, Donald Herbert, a, w, sp, Fond du Lac, Wis. B.A. (Dakota Wesleyan U.) '28. 

Roque, Francisco Tuazon, a, w, sp, Philippine Islands. S.B. '27. 

Rosen, James Alan, a, w, sp, Maiden, Mass. A.B. (Harvard C.) '28. 

Rosenberg, Sidney, a, w, sp, Chicago. S.B. '27. 

Rosenthal, Alexander Herman, s, Brooklyn, N.Y. B.S. (C. of City of New York) '25. 

Rurik, William George, s, Chicago. S.B. '27. 

Sammet, Joel Francis, sp, Elmira, N.Y. B.A. (Cornell U.) '29. 

Sands, Thyra Edith, w, sp, Oak Forest. Ph.B. '19. 

Schick, Armin Frederick, a, w, sp, Chicago. S.B. '28. 

Schwartz, Louis Nathaniel, a, w, sp, Dorchester, Mass. A.B. (Harvard U.) '27. 

Scott, Brown, w, sp, Marshall, Mo. A.B. (Lawrence C.) '27. 

Scott, Dale F., s, a, w, Chicago. B.A. (Carthage C.) '24. 



134 THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO 

Sears, Kenneth Marshall, 'a, w, Fruitland, Utah. S.B. (Wheaton C.) '26. 

Shaffer, Joseph, s, w, sp, Chicago. S.B. '27. 

Shambaugh, George Elmer, s, Chicago. B.A. (Amherst C.) '24. 

Sharer, Robert F., s, Mount Morris. S.B. '26. 

Sheinin, Louis, a, w, sp, Akron, Ohio. B.S. (U. of Akron) '27. 

Sheppard, Mary Sawyer, s, Okmulgee, Okla. M.S. '20. 

Shpiner, Leonard Benjamin, s, Newark, N.J. S.B. '25. 

Silton, Maurice Zolman, sp, Dover, N.H. B.S. (Harvard U.) '28. 

Silvian, Harry, a, w, sp, Whiting, Ind. S.B. '28. 

Smiley, Ralph Everett, s, a, sp, Grinnell, Iowa. A.B. (Grinnell C.) '26. 

Smith, Jacob, sp, Medford, Mass. A.B. (Harvard U.) '27. 

Snodgrass, Ralph William, a, w, sp, Red Oak, Iowa. B.S. (Drury C.) '27. 

Southworth, Harry Fox, w, sp, Prescott, Ariz. B.S. (U. of Idaho) '28. 

Stafford, Wilfred Farber, a, w, sp, Genesee. A.B. (Harvard U.) '28. 

Stauffer, William M., s, a, w, Quakertown, Pa. A.B. (Bluff ton C.) '20. 

Stenhouse, Evangeline E., s, a, w, sp, Chicago. Ph.B. '16. 

Steen, William Brooks, a, w, sp, Joliet. S.B. '25. 

Stenn, Fred, a, w, sp, Chicago. S.B. '28. 

Stocking, Ruth Evangeline, w, Clarendon, Tex. B.A. (U. of Texas) '18. 

Stoehr, Ernest Richard, a, w, sp, Chicago. S.B. '27. 

Stolz, Regina F., a, w, sp, Chicago. Ph.B. '26. 

Strauser, Emory Ross, s, a, w, sp, Plainfield, Iowa. Ph.D. '29. 

Stulik, Lincon, a, w, sp, Chicago. S.B. '28. 

Sutton, Charles Frederick, a, w, sp, Battle Creek, Mich. M.S. (Battle Creek C.) '28. 

Swiatek, Frank Robert, a, w, sp, Chicago. B.S. '27. 

Szurek, Stanislaus Andrew, s, a, w, sp, Chicago. B.S. '27. 

Tanenbaum, Albert Louis, s, Chicago. B.S. (U. of Illinois) '22. 

Taylor, Samuel Gale, s, a, w, sp, Chicago. B.A. (Yale U.) '27. 

Terrell, Edward Eugene, s, sp, San Marco, Tex. B.S. (U. of Arizona) '25. 

Tobin, Paul Gordon, sp, Elgin. B.S. (Notre Dame U.) '28. 

Torgow, Abraham Morris, a, w, sp, Detroit, Mich. A.B. (U. of Michigan) '27. 

Tucker, Winston Harris, s, a, w, sp, Battle Creek, Mich. M.S. '27. 

Tuttle, William McCullough, a, w, sp, Watkins Glen, N.Y. A.B. (Hope C.) '27. 

Tutunjian, Khacher Hoysep, s, Ripon, Wis. A.B. (Ripon C.) '22. 

Vorwald, Arthur John, s, a, w, sp, Dubuque, Iowa. A.B. (Columbia C.) '26. 

Wagenaar, Edward Howard, a, w, sp, Constantine, Mich. A.B. (Hope C.) '27. 

Walkowiak, Eugene Richard, a, w, Chicago. S.B. '26. 

Waugh, John McMaster, s, a, w, sp, Tarkio, Mo. A.B. (Tarkio C.) '27. 

Webster, James Randolph, s, a, w, Chicago. S.B. '27. 

Weedon, Frederick Renfree, s, Tampa, Fla. M.S. (U. of Florida) '23. 

Weinberg, Ernest, s, a, Cleveland, Ohio. S.B. (U. of Michigan) '26. 

Wells, Rodney Clarke, Jr., a, w, Marshalltown, Iowa. B.A. (Grinnell C.) '28. 

Welsh, John Wallace, a, w, sp, Wheaton. B.S. (Wheaton C.) '27. 

Wen, Chi, s, Peking, China. S.B. '27. 

Westerdahl, Arvid Emanuel, a, w, sp, Chicago. B.S. (Knox C.) '28. 

Wiborg, Walter Norman, a, w, sp, Chicago. S.B. '28. 

Wickwire, Ethel, a, w, sp, Angola, Indiana. Ph.D. (Columbia U.) '21. 

Wilson, Earle Edward, a, w, sp, Chicago. S.B. '26. 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOLS 135 

Wood, Frank Oliver, s, a, w, sp, Waco, Tex. A.B. (Baylor U.) '27. 

Wood, Oliver Marshall, a, w, sp, Ipava. A.B. (Park C.) '27. 

Woolpert, Oram, a, w, sp, Hood River, Ore. A.B. (Harvard C.) '22. 

Wortley, Cabray, s, a, w, sp, Winnetka. B.A. (Williams C.) '27. 

Yabe, Tadashi, s, a, w, sp, Chicago. B.A. (Otterbein C.) '24. 

Young, Arthur Raymond, s, a, w, sp, Wichita, Kan. S.B. (U. of Kansas) '18. 

Young, Asa Dougal, sp, Mansfield. A.B. (U. of Illinois) '26. 

Zbitnoff, Nicholas, a, w, sp, Blaine Lake, Sask., Canada. B.A. (U. of Saskatchewan) '24. 

Zieman, Stephen, a, w, sp, Chicago. M.A. (Gonzaga U.) '24. 

JUNIORS 

Adaskavich, Stephen A., s, a, w, Chicago. S.B. '26. 

Alexander, Cornelius Allen, a, w, sp, Chicago. A.B. (Fisk U.) '23. 

Angell, Charles Augustus, a, w, sp, Vermilion, S.D. A.B. (U. of South Dakota) '26. 

Atwood, David Carpenter, a, w, sp, Madison, Wis. A.B. (U. of Wisconsin) '26. 

Bagnuolo, Anthony, a, w, sp, Chicago. S.B. '27. 

Bartlett, Wayne Chrispian, a, w, sp, Spearville, Kan. A.B. (Kansas U.) '27. 

Belinkoff, Julius, a, w, sp, Newark, N.J. A.B. (Johns Hopkins U.) '25. 

Belnap, Howard Knight, a, w, sp, Ogden, Utah. A.B. (U. of Utah) '26. 

Bennett, John Charles, sp, Charles City, Iowa. M.S. (U. of Iowa) '24. 

Benson, Reuben A., sp, Brookings, S.D. A.B. (St. Olaf C.) '26. 

Bergner, Elizabeth Anne, s, a, Chicago. S.M. '16. 

Blair, Lyman Curtis, a, w, sp, Clarksville, Tex. A.B. (Rice Inst.) '26. 

Bleiweiss, Irving Jerome, sp, Cleveland, Ohio. A.B. (U. of Michigan) '27. 

Block, Marcus Theodore, a, w, sp, Newark, N.J. A.B. (Cornell U.) '25; S.B. (U. of 

Kansas) '28. 
Boyle, Harry Hadley, s, a, Chicago. A.B. (Indiana State Normal S.) '19; S.M. '26. 
Brown, Lawrence Tracy, s, a, Urbana. A.B. (U. of Colorado) '23; A.M. (U. of Illinois) 

'27. 
Brown, Walter Bigelow, s, a, Granville, Ohio. A.B. (Coe C.) '24. 
Burkhardt, Boyd Alonzo, w, sp, Tipton, Ind. A.B. (U. of Alabama) '29. 
Burkwall, Herman Fuson, a, w, sp, Canton, South China. A.B. (Park C.) '25. 
Burns, Malcolm Owen, sp, Somers, Mont. S.B. (U. of Washington) '25. 
Carlson, Carl Edwin, a, w, sp, Ortonville, Minn. A.B. (U. of Minnesota) '27. 
Carrington, Samuel Macon, a, w, sp, Nelson, Va. A.B. (U. of North Carolina) '26. 
Clements, Ralph Mayo, a, Northport, Ala. S.B. (U. of Alabama) '26; M.S. (ibid.) '27. 
Cohen, Hardin, a, w, sp, Chicago. S.B. '26. 
Cohen, Ray, a, w, sp, Des Moines, Iowa. S.B. '26. 
Cook, Harold Bryon, s, Oelwein, Iowa. A.B. (Cornell C.) '22; M.S. (Iowa State C.) 

'23. 
Cooper, Maurice Edmund, s, a, Chicago. S.B. '25. 

Cooper, William Alexander, Jr., a, w, sp, Raleigh, N.C. A.B. (U. of North Carolina) '26. 
Corrigan, Marion, sp, Chicago. S.B. '22. 

Cunningham, Arthur Franklin, a, w, sp, Spokane, Wash. A.B. (Dartmouth C.) '26. 
Danielson, Lennox, a, w, sp, Litchfield, Minn. A.B. (U. of Pennsylvania) '25. 
DePree, James Fenger, s, a, w, Holland, Mich. A.B. (Hope C.) '26. 
DeVenecia, German A., a, w, sp, Philippine Islands. A.B. (Johns Hopkins U.) '26. 
DeYoung, George Marion, sp, Orange City, Iowa. M.A. (Princeton U.) '27. 



136 THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO 

Diffenderfer, Ralph Ewing, s, a, Blue Island. S.B. '26. 

Dorsey, John Michael, a, w, sp, Streator. S.B. '27. 

Dostal, Lumir Edward, s, a, w, Cedar Rapids, Iowa. S.B. (Coe C.) '26. 

Doty, Horace Welles, Jr., a, w, sp, Pocatello, Idaho. S.B. (U. of Idaho) '25. 

DuBois, Franklin Smith, a, w, sp, Liberty, Ind, A.B. (Wabash C.) '26; M.S. '28. 

Earle, B. Baylis, s, San Diego, Calif. A.B. (Baylor U.) '25. 

Edelstein, Rudolph, a, w, sp, Gary, Ind. S.B. '26. 

Edmondson, Hugh A., a, w, sp, Maysville, Ark. A.B. (U. of Oklahoma) '26. 

Ehrler, Glenn Guild, a, w, sp, Nora. S.B. '26. 

Eiseman, Charles, a, w, sp, Chicago. S.B. (U. of Wisconsin) '24; M.S. (ibid.) '25; Ph.D. 

'28. 
Elkourie, Leo Alexander, s, Birmingham, Ala. S.B. (U. of Alabama) '26: S.M. (ibid.) 

'27. 
Entringer, Albert Joseph, a, w, sp, Dubuque, Iowa. A.B. (Columbia C.) '26. 
Farrior, James Harvey, a, w, sp, Letohatchie, Ala. A.B. (U. of Alabama) '27. 
Fitzgibbon, Joseph Paul, sp, Sioux Falls, S.D. A.B. (Creighton U.) '26. 
Foster, Allyn King, Jr., s, a, Chicago. S.B. (Colgate U.) '26. 
Fouser, Ralph Homer, s, Chicago. D.D.S. (Northwestern U.) '11; S.B. (Lewis Inst.) 

'25; B.S.M. (Loyola U.) '27. 
Fox, George William, a, w, sp, Madison, Wis. A.B. (U. of Wisconsin) '27. 
Fredberg, Clifford Walter, a, w, Rockford. A.B. (Augustana C.) '25. 
Gast, Carl Leonard, s, a, Chicago. S.B. '26. 
Gasteyer, Theodore Hall, s, a, Loup City, Neb. S.B. '26. 
Gaynor, Martin Francis, s, Indian Orchard, Mass. A.B. (Holy Cross C.) '24. 
Gibbins, Ivanoel, a, St. Joseph, Mo. A.B. (Park C.) '22. 
Gilchrist, Richard Kennedy, a, w, sp, Chicago. S.B. '26. 
Givens, Julian Hawthorne, s, a, Monmouth. S.B. '25. 
Gower, Walter Eugene, sp, Odell. A.B. (U. of Illinois) '25. 
Greer, Frank Emmet, a, w, sp, Chicago. M.S. (Kalamazoo C.) '21. 
Gribble, Louis Harry, a, w, sp, S. Brownsville, Pa. S.B. (U. of Pittsburgh) '26. 
Hand, John Gregg, a, w, sp, Philadelphia, Pa. A.B. (Yale U.) '25. 
Hansen, Alton Schour, a, w, sp, Paradise, Utah. S.B. (Utah Agricultural C.) '26. 
Hansen, Fred Arnold, a, w, sp, Council Bluffs, Iowa. A.B. (Creighton U.) '27. 
Hanson, Julia Pearl, a, w, sp, Berea, Ky. A.B. (Berea C.) '26. 
Harkins, Henry Nelson, a, Chicago. S.B. '25. 
Hart, Wilber, s, a, Midland, Mich. S.B. (Michigan State C.) '26. 
Healey, Claire Eliza, s, a, Elgin. A.B. (Mount Holyoke C.) '17. 
Hegg, Lester Raymond, a, w, sp, Decorah, Iowa. A.B. (Luther C.) '26; S.B. (U. of 

North Dakota) '28. 
Herron, Paul H., a, w, sp, Monroe, La. A.B. (U. of Nebraska) '26. 
Hewitt, William Roy, a, w, sp, Hillsboro, N.D. A.B. (Jamestown C.) '24; S.B. (U. of 

North Dakota) '28. 
Hickman, Jane Franklin, a, w, sp, Columbia, Mo. A.B. (U. of Missouri) '25; A.M. 

(ibid.) '27; S.B. (ibid.) '28. 
Hirsh, Leon Harris, a, w, sp, Milwaukee, Wis. A.B. (Johns Hopkins U.) '26. 
Hodges, Dean Wesley, a, w, sp, Toulon. S.B. '26. 
Hohman, Roy Max, a, w, sp, Chicago. S.B. '26. 
Holecek, Frank, a, w, Cicero. S.B. '26. 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOLS 137 

Hopkins, John William, a, w, sp, Lexington, Mo. A.B. (Vanderbilt U.) '23. 

Hospers, Cornelius Albertus, a, w, Chicago. A.B. (Hope C.) '26. 

Howell, Llewelyn, sp, Fargo, N.D. S.B. (North Dakota Agricultural C.) '26. 

Hunt, Luke Weldon, s, a, w, Johnson City, Tenn. S.B. '22; M.S. '27. 

Ingebrigtson, Ernest Kaspari Glesne, a, w, sp, Michigan, N.D. A.B. (Concordia C.) 
'24; S.B. (U. of North Dakota) '28. 

Johnson, Joseph Lealand, sp, Philadelphia, Pa. S.B. (Penn State C.) '19. 

Johnson, Paul Thomas, a, w, sp, Riverdale. S.B. '26. 

Jones, Beatrice Olwen, a, w, sp, Racine, Wis. S.B. (Milwaukee-Douner C.) '20; M.A. 
(Columbia U.) '23. 

Kelly, William Vincent, a, w, sp, Tunnelton, W.Va. A.B. (Mt. St. Mary's C.) '22. 

Kernwein, Graham A., sp, Chicago. S.B. '26. 

Kirby, William James, s, a, Chicago. S.B. '26. 

Kistler, Gene Haviland, a, w, sp, Royal Centre, Ind. A.B. (Wabash C.) '26; M.S. '28. 

Knierim, Frederick Matthew, a, w, Rock Port, Mo. A.B. (Tarkio C.) '26. 

Kohl, Martha, a, w, Marshfield, Wis. A.B. (U. of California) '24; S.M. (U. of Wiscon- 
sin) '26. 

Laird, James A., s, Madison, Wis. S.B. (U. of Wisconsin) '15. 

Leininger, Alfred Theobald, a, w, sp, Wayside, Wis. S.B. '26. 

Leserman, Lester K., sp, Chicago. S.B. '27. 

Lewison, Matthew Michael, sp, Chicago. S.B. '27. 

Li, Keh-Hung, a, w, Shanghai, China. S.B. (Shanghai C.) '25. 

Lundstrom, Julia Margaret, a, w, sp, Sterling. A.B. (U. of Illinois) '26. 

Maisel, John Josiah, a, w, sp, Buffalo, N.Y. A.B. (Harvard U.) '25. 

Makowski, Stanley Joseph, a, w, sp, Westbury, N.Y. S.B. (St. John's C.) '26. 

Masters, Thomas Davis, Jr., s, a, Springfield. S.B. '26. 

McCarty, Joseph Carroll, a, Chicago. A.B. (South East Missouri State Teachers C.) 
'23. 

McCarthy, John Daniel, sp, Chicago. S.B. '27. 

McClelland, Preston Henkle, a, w, Decatur. A.B. (James Millikin U.) '21. 

McGee, Lemuel Clyde, a, Wichita Falls, Tex. Ph.D. '27. 

Mclntyre, Archibald Ross, sp, Stockport, England. S.B. '27. 

Michel, Herbert Leon, sp, Chicago. S.B. '28. 

Miller, Samuel Lewis, s, a, w, Detroit, Mich. A.B. (U. of Michigan) '26. 

Minnema, Clarence, a, w, sp, Chicago. S.B. (Lewis Inst.) '24. 

Mintz, Abraham, sp, Scranton, Pa. S.B. (New York U.) '25. 

Moffatt, J. Stuart, a, w, sp, Arpin, Wis. A.B. (Ripon C.) '25. 

Morris, Raymond LeGrand, sp, Holland, Mich. A.B. (Kalamazoo C.) '26. 

Murphy, Edward Lee, s, a, Boise, Idaho. A.B. (U. of Utah) '24. 

Neacy, Clement Francis, s, Milwaukee, Wis. S.B. (Colgate C.) '24. 

Nefflen, Edgar Lance, a, w, sp, Elkins, W.Va. A.B. (Davis & Elkins C.) '23; S.B. 
(West Virginia U.) '28. 

Newlove, Frank Elwood, a, sp, Des Moines, Iowa. S.B. '26. 

Nichamin, Samuel Julian, a, w, sp, Detroit, Mich. A.B. (U. of Michigan) '26. 

Olson, Paul Frederick, a, w, sp, Decorah, Iowa. A.B. (Luther C.) '26. 

Oslund, Robert M., a, w, sp, Great Falls, Mont. A.B. (U. of Montana) '20; Ph.D. '23. 

Paul, Tom Dickey, sp, Wyoming, Ohio. S.B. '27. 

Peacock, William Frank, s, Vidalia, Ga. A.B. (Wake Forest C.) '24. 



138 THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO 

Peterson, Paul Gilbert, sp, Randall, Iowa. A.B. (St. Olaf C.) '27. 

Peterson, Philip Leslie, a, w, sp, Randall, Iowa. A.B. (St. Olaf C.) '26. 

Petrone, Rosco Edward, a, w, Chicago. S.B. '26. 

Plaut, Julian Leo, a, w, sp, Chicago. S.B. '26. 

Poppen, James Leonard, a, w, sp, Holland, Mich. A.B. (Hope C.) '26. 

Potter, Charles Chandler, s, a, w, Fulton, Mo. S.B. (Shurtleff C.) '24. 

Rappaport, Joseph Nathan, sp, Ottawa, Ohio. A.B. (Ohio State U.) '27. 

Rappeport, Arthur, a, w, sp, Gary, Ind. S.B. '26. 

Redfern, William Westbrook, s, a, Lansing, Mich. S.B. (Michigan State C.) '21. 

Redgwick, John Philbrook, s, a, Omaha, Neb. S.B. '26. 

Risk, Roy Ross, s, a, Madison, Ind. S.B. '24. 

Robertson, Sylvan H., sp, Indiana Harbor, Ind. S.B. '27. 

Rogers, Fred Terry, sp, Henderson, Ky. A.B. (Baylor U.) '11; A.M. (ibid.) '14. 

Rogers, John C, sp, Henderson, Ky. Ph.D. '26. 

Romberger, Arland Seth, a, w, sp, Valley View, Pa. S.B. (Valparaiso U.) '23; S.B. 

(U. of South Dakota) '28. 
Rosenthal, Alexander Herman, a, w, Brooklyn, N.Y. S.B. (C. of City of New York) 

'25; A.M. (Columbia U.) '27. 
Rosi, Alcide Louis, s, Chicago. S.B. '26. 

Rotter, Israel Irving, s, a, w, Milwaukee, Wis. S.B. (U. of Wisconsin) '21. 
Rozendal, Peter Henry, a, w, sp, Volga, S.D. S.B. (Dakota Wesleyan U.) '25. 
Rurik, William George, a, w, sp, Chicago. S.B. '27. 
Rushing, Garland Stanley, s, Chidester, Ark. S.B. (U. of Arkansas) '23. 
Sabath, Donald Joseph, a, w, sp, Chicago. S.B. '26. 

Sadlek, Lawrence Anthony, a, w, sp, Chicago Heights. A.B. (Marquette U.) '27. 
Scharnagel, Isabel Mona, s, a, w, sp, Tuscaloosa, Ala. A.B. (U. of Alabama) '26. 
Schmitt, Richard Klatte, s, a, Columbus, Ind. A.B. (Hanover C.) '21. 
Schoolnic, Jacob Wolfe, a, w, sp, Fairmont, W.Va. A.B. (West Virginia U.) '26* 

S.B. (ibid.) '28. 
Schultz, Abe, s, a, Mason City, Iowa. S.B. '26. 
Scott, Dale F., sp, Chicago. A.B.' (Carthage C.) '24. 
Sears, Kenneth Marshall, sp, Fruitland, Utah. S.B. (Wheaton C.) '26. 
Seevers, Maurice Harrison, a, w, sp, Topeka, Kan. A.B. (Washburn C.) '24; Ph.D. '28. 
Seron, Zaven, sp, Chicago. S.B. '24. 

Serwer, Milton John, a, w, sp, Detroit, Mich. A.B. (U. of Michigan) '26. 
Sharer, Robert F., a, w, sp, Mount Morris. S.B. '26. 
Sheppard, Mary Sawyer, a, w, sp, Okmulgee, Okla. M.S. '20. 
Skinner, Clifford Weld, s, a, Ashville, N.Y. S.B. (Allegheny C.) '21. 
Smith, Erma Anita, s, Poughkeepsie, N.Y. A.B. (U. of Kansas) '20; A.M. (Vassar C.) 

'22. 
Soloff, Louis Alexander, a, w, Philadelphia, Pa. A.B. (U. of Pennsylvania) '26. 
Stackhouse, Stirling Perry, a, w, sp, Chicago. S.B. '27. 
Stauffer, William M., sp, Quakertown, Pa. A.B. (Bluffton C.) '20. 
Steen, William Brooks, sp, Joliet. S.B. '25. 

Steichen, Edward Francis, s, a, Wichita, Kan. A.B. (U. of Kansas) '26. 
Stephens, Willie Mary, s, Pikeville, Tenn. A.B. (U. of Tennessee) '20; A.M. (Ohio 

State U.) '23. 
Stocking, Ruth, sp, Clarendon, Tex. A.B. (U. of Texas) '18. 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOLS 139 

Strauser, Emory Ross, sp, Plainfield, Iowa. S.B. (U. of Iowa) '25. 

Takaki, Herbert, s, a, Honolulu, T.H. (U. of Chicago.) 

Tanenbaum, Samuel, w, sp, Brooklyn, N.Y. S.B. (C. of the City of New York) '24; 

S.B. (Kansas U.) '28. 
Terrell, Edward Eugene, a, San Marcos, Tex. S.B. (U. of Arizona) '25. 
Terry, Albert Asbury, a, w, sp, Dallas, Tex. A.B. (U. of Texas) '26. 
Thieda, Arthur Alexander, a, w, Cicero. S.B. '26. 
Timm, Chester William, a, sp, Chicago. S.B. '24. 
Toomey, Glenn William, a, w, sp, Devils Lake, N.D. A.B. (U. of North Dakota) '26; 

S.B. {ibid.) '28. 
Twente, Julius, a, Napoleon, Mo. A.B. (U. of Missouri) '23. 
VanZante, Peter, a, w, sp, Leighton, Iowa. S.B. '26. 
Wagner, Harold Clifford, a, w, sp, Minneapolis, Minn. S.B. (Massachusetts Inst, of 

Tech.) '22; M.S. (ibid.) '23. 
Walkowiak, Eugene Richard, sp, Chicago. S.B. '26. 
Wallach, Robert, a, w, sp, Morgantown, W.Va. A.B. (West Virginia U.) '26; S.B. 

(ibid.) '28. 
Weaver, Howard Bierly, a, w, sp, Mineral City, Ohio. S.B. (Heidelberg U.) '25. 
Webster, James Randolph, sp, Chicago. S.B. '27. 
Weinberg, Ernest, w, sp, Cleveland, Ohio. A.B. (U. of Mich.) '26. 
Weiner, William Max, s, a, San Francisco, Calif. A.B. (U. of California) '25. 
Wells, John Sam, Jr., a, w, sp, Clearwater, Fla. A.B. (Centre C.) '25. 
Wen, Chi C, a, w, sp, Peking, China. S.B. '27. 

Wheless, William Perry, a, w, sp, Spring Hope, N.C. A.B. (U. of North Carolina) '26. 
Wolf, Albert Meyer, a, w, sp, Chicago. S.B. '26. 
Wolf, Alexander M., a, Chicago, S.B. '22. 
Wolfson, Albert Abraham, s, a, Oak Park. S.B. '26. 
Wynekoop, Frances Catherine, a, w, sp, Chicago. S.B. '27. 
Yabe, Tadashi, sp, Fukushima, Japan. A.B. (Otterbein C.) '24. 
Young, Arthur Raymond, sp, Wichita, Kan. S.B. (U. of Kansas) '18. 
Young, Asa Dougal, a, w, sp, Champaign. A.B. (U. of Illinois) '26. 

, SENIORS 

Abbott, William Richard, s, Rexburg, Idaho. A.B. (U. of Utah) '26. 
Abelson, Albert, s, a, w, New York City, N.Y. A.B. (Columbia U.) '25. 
Adaskavich, Stephen A., sp, Chicago. S.B. '26. 

Andersen, Oswald Nickoly, s, a, w, Madison, Wis. A.B. (U. of Wisconsin) '26. 
Anderson, Edward Nicholas, s, a, w, Mason City, Iowa. S.B. (U. of Notre Dame) '22. 
Ashworth, Wease Lee, s, a, w, Buckhannon, W.Va. A.B. (West Virginia U.) '25; S.B. 

(ibid.) '27. 
Baeumle, Clarence Earl, s, Ashland, Wis. S.B. '25. 
Baron, Charles, s, a, w, sp, Beloit, Wis. S.B. (Beloit C.) '25. 
Baumgartner, M. Meredith, s, a, w, Springfield, Ohio. A.B. (Wittenberg C.) '23. 
Beardsley, Ralph Wesley, s, a, Kankakee. S.B. '26. 
Beck, James Simon Peter, s, Hartselle, Ala. S.B. (U. of Alabama) '24. 
Beeuwkes, Lambertus Eugene, a, w, sp, Holland, Mich. S.B. (Michigan State C.) '25. 
Bennett, Frederick Robert, s, a, Omro, Wis. S.B. '25. 
Benson, Otis Otto, Jr., s, a, w, Tower, Minn. A.B. (U. of Montana) '24; S.M. (U. of 

Iowa) '25. 



140 THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO 

Berard, LeRoy Henry, s, a, Chicago. Ph.B. '19; A.M. '20. 

Berger, Samuel, s, a, w, Chicago. S.B. '25. 

Bergner, Elizabeth Anne, w, sp, Chicago. S.B. '15; S.M. '16. 

Berry, Leonidas Harris, a, w, sp, Norfolk, Va. S.B. '25. 

Boyle, Harry Hadley, w, sp, Chicago. A.B. (Indiana State Normal S.) '19; S.M., '26. 

Brady, Anne Lucille, s, a, w, Early, Iowa. A.B. (U. of Wisconsin) '26. 

Brandman, Harry, s, a, w, Whiting, Ind. S.B. '25. 

Brown, Emmet Michael, s, a, w, Ashland, Wis. A.B. (C. of St. Thomas) '16; S.B. (U. 

of North Dakota) '27. 
Brown, Lawrence Tracy, w, sp, Urbana. A.B. (U. of Colorado) '23; A.M. (U. of 

Illinois) '27. 
Brown, Walter Bigelow, w, sp, Granville, Ohio. A.B. (Coe C.) '24. 
Bruechert, Stanley Schaefer, s, a, w, Iowa City, Iowa. A.B. (State U. of Iowa) '25. 
Bryant, Arthur Ralph, s, a, w, sp, Hastings, Neb. A.B. (Grinnell C.) '25. 
Burr, Harry Bunyan, s, a, w, Caldwell, Tex. A.B. (Baylor U.) '24. 
Burtness, Hildahl Ingbert, s, a, w, sp, Blooming Prairie, Minn. A.B. (St. Olaf C.) '25. 
Canada, Maurice, s, a, w, sp, Chicago. A.B. (Upper Iowa U.) '22. 
Cannon, George Dows, a, w, Jersey City, N.J. A.B. (Lincoln U.) '24. 
Cardon, Leonard, s, Chicago. S.B. '25. 

Cartmell, William Holton, s, a, w, Maysville, Ky. A.B. (U. of Kentucky) '25. 
Cater, Job Thigpen, s, Greenville, Ala. A.B. (U. of Alabama) '22. 
Chow, William Sze Hsin, s, Peking, China. S.B. '25. 
Coleman, Peter F., s, a, w, Brooklyn, N.Y. S.B. (C. of City of New York) '25; Ph.G. 

(Columbia College of Pharmacy) '25. 
Collins, Kenneth Heath, s, Moscow, Idaho. S.B. (U. of Idaho) '22. 
Connell, Isee Lee, s, a, sp, Davenport, Iowa. A.B. (Howard C.) '20. 
Cooper, Maurice E., w, sp, Des Moines, Iowa. S.B. '25. 
Cox, Dowlen Dorsey, w, sp, Arab, Ala. S.B. (Birmingham Southern C.) '27. 
Crawford, Helen Lucile, s, a, w, Urbana. A.B. (U. of Illinois) '15; A.M. (Columbia U.) 

'22. 
Darrow, Ruth Renter, s, a, w, Chicago. A.B. (Western Reserve U\) '18. 
DeCosta, Edwin J., s, a, w, Chicago. S.B. '26. 
DePree, James Fenger, sp, Holland, Mich. A.B. (Hope C.) '26. 
DeVries, Daniel, s, a, w, Grand Rapids, Mich. A.B. (Calvin C.) '25. 
Diamond, Mortimer, s, a, Chicago. S.B. '26. 
Diffenderfer, Ralph Ewing, w, sp, Blue Island. S.B. '26. 
Dostal, Lumir Edward, sp, Cedar Rapids, Iowa. S.B. (Coe C.) '26. 
Duehr, Peter Alexander, a, w, Hayward, Wis. A.B. (U. of Wisconsin) '26; A.M. (ibid.) 

'27. 
Duncan, James Wallace, a, w, sp, Fargo, N.D. S.B. (North Dakota Agr. C.) '24. 
Durham, Morgan Allan, s, Denver, Colo. A.B. (U. of Denver) '24. 
Eagleburger, Leon Sidney, s, a, w, Stevens Point, Wis. S.B. (U. of Wisconsin) '27. 
Earle, B. Baylis, a, w, sp, San Diego, Calif. A.B. (Baylor U.) '25. 
Elkourie, Leo Alexander, a, w, sp, Birmingham, Ala. S.B. (U. of Alabama) '26; S.M. 

(ibid.) '27. 
English, Kinsey Ourant, s, a, w, sp, Freeport, Ohio. A.B. (Ohio U.) '23; S.B. (West 

Virginia U.) '27. 
Evans, Kenneth Patton, a, w, sp, Northport, Ala. A.B. (U. of Alabama) '25; S.B. (ibid.) 

'27. 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOLS 141 

Fairbi-other, William Carter, s, a, Bantry, N.D. A.B. (U. of North Dakota) '24; S.B. 

(ibid.) '27. 
Fearrington, James Cornelius Pass, s, a, w, Winston-Salem, N.C. A.B. (U. of North 

Carolina) '25. 
Ferguson, Ralph Alton, a, w, sp, Grand Forks, N.D. A.B. (U. of California) '24; S.B. 

(U. of North Dakota) '27. 
Ferrell, Lewis Joseph, s, a, Harrison, Mont. S.B. (Montana State C.) '24. 
Fisher, John Alfred, s, a, w, sp, Pittsburgh, Pa. S.B. (C. of Wooster) '24. 
Foster, Allyn King, Jr., w, sp, Chicago. S.B. (Colgate U.) '25; M.S. '29. 
Foster, John Wesley, s, a, w, Chapel Hill, N.C. A.B. (U. of North Carolina) '19; LL.B. 

(ibid.) '23. 
Fouser, Ralph Homer, a, w, sp, Chicago. D.D.S. (Northwestern U.) '11; S.B. (Lewis 

Inst.) '25; B.S.M. (Loyola U.) '27. 
Frame, Luke Wright, s, a, w, Morgantown, W.Va. S.B. in Agr. (West Virginia U.) '24; 

S.B. (West Virginia U.) '27. 
Freund, Robert Richard, s, a, w, Evansville, Ind. A.B. (DePauw U.) '25. 
Gast, Carl Leonard, w, sp, Chicago. S.B. '26. 
Gasteyer, Theodore Hall, w, sp, Loup City, Neb. S.B. '26. 
Gaston, Herbert Bothwell, s, a, w, sp, Lawrence, Kan. A.B. (Kansas U.) '25. 
Gaynor, Martin Francis, a, w, sp, Indian Orchard, Mass. A.B. (Holy Cross C.) '24. 
Gibbins, Ivanoel, w, sp, St. Joseph, Mo. A.B. (Park C.) '22. 
Givens, Julian Hawthorne, w, sp, Chicago. S.B. '25. 
Goodman, Aubrey Louis, a, w, sp, Waco, Tex. S.B. '25. 
Gordon, Wayne, s, a, w, Chicago. A.B. (Franklin C.) '25. 
Greenebaum, Henry Arthur, s, Chicago. S.B. '24. 
Gronhovd, Gilbert Otto, s, a, w, Grand Forks, N.D. A.B. (Concordia C.) '23; S.B. 

(U. of North Dakota) '27. 
Hanson, Harold Birger, a, w, sp, Chicago. A.B. (Augustana C.) '25. 
Harkins, Henry Nelson, w, sp, Chicago. S.B. '25; S.M. '26; Ph.D. '28. 
Hart, Wilber, w, sp, Midland, Mich. S.B. (Michigan State C.) '26. 
Haugen, Clifford O., s, a, w, Honeyford, N.D. A.B. (U. of North Dakota) '26; S.M. 

(ibid.) '27. 
Healey, Claire Eliza, w, sp, Elgin. A.B. (Mount Holyoke C.) '17. 
Henrikson, Earl Clifford, s, a, w, sp, Omaha, Neb. A.B. (U. of Minnesota) '27. 
Henry, Merlyn George, s, a, w, sp, Platteville, Wis. A.B. (U. of Wisconsin) '26; S.M. 

(ibid.) '27. 
Hiller, Grace, s, a, Swampscott, Mass. A.B. (Smith C.) '20. 
Hirsch, Daniel Louis, s, Chicago. S.B. '23. 
Hoffman, William Samuel, s, a, w, Baltimore, Md. A.B. (Johns Hopkins U.) '18; Ph.D. 

. (ibid.) '22. 
Hoilien, Maurice James, w, sp, Aberdeen, S.D. A.B. (U. of South Dakota) '26; S.B. 

(ibid.) '27. 
Holecek, Frank, sp, Cicero. S.B. '26. 

Holt, Frank, s, a, Rich Valley, Minn. S.B. (South Dakota State S. of Mines) '24. 
Holton, Sylvia Gates, w, sp, Chicago. A.B. (Mount Holyoke C.) '25. 
Humphreys, Eleanor Mary, s, sp, Fair Haven, Vt. A.B. (Smith C.) '17. 
Hunt, Luke Weldon, sp, Johnson City, Tenn. S.B. '22; M.S. '27. 
Hurwitz, Ben Lewis, s, a, w, Milwaukee, Wis. A.B. (U. of Wisconsin) '26. 



142 THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO 

Isaacs, Fred Rife, s, a, w, Lawrence, Kan. A.B. (Kansas U.) '24; A.M. (ibid.) '25. 

Jenkins, Richard Leos, s, a, w, Culver City, Calif. A.B. (Stanford U.) '25. 

Johnson, Carl August, s, a, Chicago. S.B. '25; S.M. '27. 

Johnston, Albert Chandler, s, a, Chicago. S.B. '25. 

Jones, Maurice L., s, a, w, sp, Lenexa, Kan. A.B. (U. of Kansas) '24; S.B. {ibid.) '27. 

Kegerreis, Roy, a, w, Chicago. M.E. in E.E. (Ohio State U.) '11; A.M. (Harvard U.) 

'16; Ph.D. (U. of Michigan) '26. 
Kenney, Joseph Raymond, s, a, w, Morgantown, W.Va. S.B. (West Virginia U.) '27. 
Kinsey, Jack LaVergne, s, Milwaukee, Wis. Senior C. 
Kirby, William, w, sp, Chicago. S.B. '26. 

Knierim, Frederick Matthew, sp, Rock Port, Mo. A.B. (Tarkio C.) '26. 
Kohl, Martha, sp, Marshfield, Wis. A.B. (U. of California) '24; S.M. (U. of Wisconsin) 

'26. 
Kostelecky, Libuse, s, a, w, sp, Chicago. S.B. '25. 

Kowals, Francis Vincent, a, w, sp, South Bend, Ind. S.B. (U. of Notre Dame) '25. 
Laird, James A., a, w, sp, Madison, Wis. S.B. (U. of Wisconsin) '15. 
Law, Stanley Guy, s, a, w, Ashland, Wis. A.B. (Northland C.) '24. 
Leckband, Norbert Frederick, s, a, w, Ocheyedan, Iowa. B.D. (Concordia S.) '24. 
LeMaster, Ralph Emerson Jenkins, s, a, w, West Lafayette, Ind. A.B. (DePauw U.) '24. 
Leppert, Charles Lynville, s, a, w, sp, McMechen, W.Va. A.B. (West Virginia U.) '25; 

S.B. (ibid.) '27. 
Levy, Robert Charles, s, a, Chicago. S.B. '26. 
Lewis, Austin Philip, s, Chicago. S.B. '25. 
Li, Keh-Hung, sp, Shanghai, China. S.B. (Shanghai C.) '25. 
Lowe, Wilfred Francis, a, w, sp, Grand Forks, N.D. A.B. (U. of North Dakota) '26; 

S.B. (ibid.) '27. 
Lund, John Arthur, a, w, sp, Northfield, Minn. A.B. (St. Olaf C.) '23; S.B. (U. of 

North Dakota) '27. 
Lutz, James Joseph, a, w, Des Moines, Iowa. A.B. (U. of Iowa) '26. 
Masters, Thomas Davis, w, sp, Springfield. S.B. '26. 

Matthews, Warren Bond, s, a, Decatur, Ga. A.B. (Emory U.) '23; S.M. (ibid.) '24. 
McBurney, Ralph, s, Tuscaloosa, Ala. S.B. (Virginia Polytechnic Inst.) '08; S.M. 

(Oklahoma A. & M. C.) '16. 
McCarty, Joseph Carroll, w, sp, Chicago. A.B. (South East Missouri State Teachers' 

College) '23. 
McClelland, Preston Henkle, sp, Decatur. A.B. (James Millikin U.) '21. 
McFetridge, Sarah Elizabeth, s, a, w, St. Clairsville, Ohio. A.B. (Muskingum C.) '24; 

S.B. (West Virginia U.) '27. 
McGee, Lemuel Clyde, w, sp, Wichita Falls, Tex. A.B. (Baylor U.) '24. 
McGuire, Leo John, s, a, w, sp, Waunakee, Wis. S.B. (U. of Wisconsin) '28. 
McLane, Evelyn Gruhlke, s, a, w, Jackson, Minn. A.B. (Hamline U.) '25. 
Means, Myron Gilmartin, s, a, w, sp, Saybrook. S.B. (Illinois Wesleyan U.) '25. 
Medelman, John Paul, s, a, w, Crary, N.D. A.B. (U. of North Dakota) '25; S.B. (ibid.) 

'27. 
Menehan, Frank Lionel, s, a, w, Lawrence, Kan. S.B. (Kansas State Teachers' C.) '22. 
Miller, Harold, s, a, w, sp, Milwaukee, Wis. S.B. (U. of Wisconsin) '27. 
Miller, Samuel Lewis, sp, Detroit, Mich. A.B. (U. of Michigan) '26. 
Monteith, Robert Fisher, a, w, sp, Marshalltown, Iowa. S.B. (Coe C.) '25. 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOLS 143 

Muirhead, Robert Mowatt, s, Moosejaw, Sask. S.B. (U. of Saskatchewan) '22. 

Murphy, Edward Lee, w, sp, Boise, Idaho. A.B. (U. of Utah) '24. 

Nammacher, Traugott Herman, s, a, w, sp, Oconomowoc, Wis. A.B. (U. of Wisconsin) 

'26; A.M. (ibid.) '27. 
Neacy, Clement Francis, a, w, sp, Milwaukee, Wis. S.B. (Colgate U.) '24. 
Needels, Louis James, s, a, Clarksburg, Mo. A.B. (U. of Missouri) '25; A.M. (ibid.) '26. 
Neiman, Benjamin Harold, s, a, w, Chicago. S.B. '26. 
Nelson, Franklin Jesse, s, a, w, Caney, Kan. A.B. (Baker U.) '27. 
Neuhauser, Irene Anna, s, a, w, sp, Gridley. S.B. '23. 

Newman, Harry William, s, a, w, Salt Lake City, Utah. A.B. (U. of Utah) '22. 
Noall, Elmer Thomas, s, a, w, Salt Lake City, Utah. S.B. (U. of Utah) '17. 
Noble, Philip Cornelius, s, a, Java, S.D. S.B. (Northern State Teachers C.) '23. 
Nordlund, Mildred, a, Chicago. S.B. '26. 

Ohlsen, Michael Peter, s, a, w, sp, Milwaukee, Wis. S.B. (U. of Wisconsin) '29. 
Olson, Archibald Oscar, s, a, w, sp, Mandan, N.D. S.B. (U. of North Dakota) '27. 
Osgood, Rudolf, s, a, w, Cambridge, Mass. S.B. (Harvard C.) '24. 
Paisley, Alfred Musgrave, a, Farmington, Iowa. S.B. '26. 
Patchen, Paul Jeremiah, a, w, sp, Chicago. S.B. '25. 
Pearl, Allen Sexton, Jr., a, w, sp, Oak Park, 111. S.B. (Dartmouth C.) '24. 
Perusse, George Louis, a, w, sp, Chicago. S.B. '25. 
Petrone, Rosco Edward, sp, Chicago. S.B. '26. 
Pier, Harry McKay, s, a, w, Chicago. S.B. (U. of Wisconsin) '22. 
Pleune, Russell Edward, s, a, w, Grand Rapids, Mich. A.B. (Hope C.) '25. 
Ploche, Leon Reginald, a, w, sp, Cuba. D.D.S. (U. of Illinois) '19; S.B. (Lewis Inst.) 

'23; S.M. (Northwestern U.) '23. 
Pollack, Saul Kenneth, a, w, Chicago. A.B. (U. of Wisconsin) '26. 
Porro, Francis Walthour, s, New York City, N.Y. S.B. '26. 
Potter, Charles Chandler, sp, Fulton, Mo. S.B. (Shurtleff C.) '24. 
Preiser, Philip, s, a, w, Charleston, W.Va. A.B. (West Virginia U.) '25; S.B. (ibid.) '27. 
Proud, Theodore Stanley, a, w, sp, South Bend, Ind. A.B. (DePauw U.) '21. 
Purifoy, Leslie Alonzo, s, a, w, sp, Chidester, Ark. A.B. (U. of Arkansas) '26. 
Redgwick, John Philbrook, w, sp, Omaha, Neb. S.B. '26. 
Reed, Paul Henry, s, Chicago. S.B. (U. of Idaho) '23. 
Risk, Roy Ross, w, sp, Madison, Ind. S.B. '24. 
Rosenthal, Alexander Herman, sp, Brooklyn, N.Y. S.B. (C. of City of New York) '25; 

M.A. (Columbia U.) '27. 
Rosi, Alcide Louis, a, w, sp, Chicago. S.B. '26. 

Rotter, Israel Irving, sp, Milwaukee, Wis. S.B. (U. of Wisconsin) '21. 
Rozen, Josef Samuel, s, a, sp, Cedar Rapids, Iowa. A.B. (Coe C.) '25. 
Rushing, Garland Stanley, sp, Chidester, Ark. S.B. (U. of Arkansas) '23. 
Schmitt, Richard Klatte, w, sp, Columbus, Ind. A.B. (Hanover C.) '21. 
Schultz, Abe, w, sp, Mason City, Iowa. S.B. '26. 
Schwartz, Ferdinand Francis, s, a, w, Cleveland, Ohio. A.B. (West Virginia U.) '25; 

S.B. (ibid.) '27. 
Shapiro, Harry, s, a, w, Milwaukee, Wis. A.B. (U. of Wisconsin) '26. 
Sheen, Herbert Arnold, a, w, sp, Chicago. S.B. '24. 

Shpiner, Leonard Benjamin, s, a, w, sp, Newark, N.J. S.B. '25; M.S. '27. 
Sippy, Hall Ivan, a, w, sp, Chicago. S.B. '21; S.M. (Michigan State C.) '25. 



144 THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO 

Sisson, Ruth, s, a, w, Providence, R.I. A.B. (Brown U.) '15. 

Skinner, Clifford Weld, w, sp, Ashville, N.Y. S.B. (Allegheny C.) '21. 

Smart, Reginald Hughes, s, a, w, Minot, N.D. A.B. (U. of North Dakota) '25; S.B. 

(ibid.) '27. 
Smiley, John Clinton, s, a, w, Belle Fourche, S.D. A.B. (U. of South Dakota) '26; S.B. 

(ibid.) '27. 
Smith, James Gibson, Jr., s, a, iv, Birmingham, Ala. A.B. (Washington and Lee U.) '25. 
Soloff, Louis Alexander, sp, Philadelphia, Pa. A.B. (U. of Pennsylvania) '26. 
Spencer, Frank Curtis, s, a, w, Chicago. B.B.A. (U. of Washington) '22. 
Spivek, Mandel Lawrence, s, a, Chicago. S.B. '25. 
Starkweather, Rodney Staples, s, Evanston. A.B. (Dartmouth C.) '24. 
Stebbins, Ernest Lyman, s, a, w, Des Moines, Iowa. S.B. (Dartmouth C.) '26. 
Steichen, Edward Francis, w, sp, Wichita, Kan. A.B. (U. of Kansas) '26. 
Stephens, Willie Mary, a, w, sp, Pikeville, Term. A.B. (U. of Tennessee) '20; A.M. (Ohio 

State U.) '23. 
Stobbe, Ludwig Henry Otto, s, a, w, Salt Lake City, Utah. A.B. (U. of Utah) '21; B.M. 

(Physicians and Surgeons C.) '24; A.M. (U. of Utah) '27. 
Strauser, Emory Ross, w, Plainfield, Iowa. S.B. (U. of Iowa)'25. 
Stuessy, Milton Franklin, s, a, w, Winslow. A.B. (North-Central C.) '25; A.M. (U. 

of Wisconsin) '27. 
Sweeley, Merle E., s, a, w, sp, Volin, S.D. A.B. (U. of South Dakota) '25; S.B. (ibid.) 

'27. 
Swigart, Marian, a, w, Clinton. A.B. (U. of Wisconsin) '26. 
Takaki, Herbert, w, Honolulu, T.H. (U. of Chicago.) 
Tanentjaum, Albert, s, a, w, sp, Chicago. S.B. (U. of Illinois) '22. 
Teusink, James Harvey, a, w, sp, Coopersville, Mich. A.B. (Hope C.) '25. 
Thieda, Arthur Alexander, sp, Cicero. S.B. '26. 
Thorup, Donald Wright, s, Chicago. A.B. (Grinnell C.) '24. 
Tosney, Harold John, s, a, w, sp, Dixon. S.B. '25. 
Tremaine, Jay Eugene, a, w, Chicago. S.B. (Dartmouth C.) '24. 
Twente, Julius, sp, Napoleon, Mo. A.B. (U. of Missouri) '23. 
Vore, Louring William, a, w, sp, Lima, Ohio. A.B. (Manchester C.) '25. 
Voris, Harold C, s, a, w, sp, Fairbury. A.B. (Hanover C.) '23. 
Wakerlin, George Earle, s, Chicago. S.B. '23; Ph.D. '26. 

Wargin, James Ignatius, a, w, sp, South Bend, Ind. S.B. (U. of Notre Dame) '25. 
Weedon, Frederick Renfroe, s, a, Tampa, Fla. S.B. (U. of Florida) '21; S.M. (ibid.) '23. 
Weiner, William Max, w, sp, San Francisco, Calif. A.B. (U. of California) '25. 
Wick, Samuel, s, a, w, Marinette, Wis. A.B. (U. of Wisconsin) '26. 
Wickham, Catherine Ida, a, w, sp, Eau Claire, Wis. A.B. (St. Clara C.) '21; A.M. 

(Columbia U.) '23. 
Williams, Lawrence Arthur, a, w, sp, Sparks, Nev. S.B. '26; S.M. '27. 
Wolf, Albert Meyer, sp, Chicago. S.B. '26. 
Wolf, Alexander, s, Chicago. S.B. '22. 
Wolf son, Albert Abraham, sp, Oak Park. S.B. '26. 
Wolpert, Milton, s, a, w, Charleston, W.Va. A.B. (West Virginia U.) '25; S.B. (ibid.) 

'27. 
Wood, Willard Leo, s, a, w, Chicago. A.B. (Indiana State Normal C.) '20; S.M. '25. 
Yolton, Leroy William, s, a, w, Bloomington. S.B. (Illinois Wesleyan U.) '21; A.M. 

(Harvard U.) '23. 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOLS 



145 



SPECIAL STUDENTS TAKING MEDICAL COURSES ON THE 

QUADRANGLES, SUMMER, AUTUMN, WINTER, 

AND SPRING QUARTERS, 1928-29 



Akama, Teichiro T. 

Albright, Francis J. 

Albus, William Reuben 

Andrews, H. L. 

Angell, Charles Augustus 

Bachhuber, Francis Gregory 

Bartlett, Wayne Chrispian 

Bassett, Ellen M. 

Beher, Raymond O. 

Bennett, V. M. 

Benson, Simon 

Bica, G. A. 

Birkeland, J. M. 

Bluhm, H. J. 

Bodansky, Oscar 

Botoloff, B. E. 

Boynton, Lyman Crowell 

Breuhaus, Herbert C. 

Bryant, Edmond 

Buchanan, J. M. 

Bueno, J. G. 

Burke, John Patrick 

Campbell, Dorothy 

Campbell, K. N. 

Capps, Richard Brooks 

Carter, Mary 

Caverhill, Ethel 

Chao, S. S. 

Chu, H. N. 

Clapp, H. G. 

Clark, Lois E. 

Coatney, G. R. 

Cohn, I. H. 

Coile, H. D. 

Cole, Versa V. 

Conway, Joseph 

Cook, Frank 

Crawford, Frank 

Crawford, Ray 

Crum, F. B. 

Daubs, W. H. 

Deihl, Ada 

DePinto, A. J 

DePonceau, Leonard 

Despotes, E. C. 

Dexter, R. R. 



Doty, Horace Welles 
Duncan, Perry Emory 
Eddy, Corinne S. 
Edwards, Flora W. 
Elin, Robert E. 
Eller, Charles Howe 
Elliman, Emma Louise 
English, P. F. 
Escher, Earl Winston 
Fainstein, H. W. 
Farrell, Ted R. 
Feirer, William Anthony 
Fentress, Mary 
Finley, Maynard H. 
Fisher, Charles Bennett 
Fitts, Ralph L. 
Foreman, M. O. 
Foulger, John Henry 
Frank, J. A. 
Friedman, Sarah R. 
Friedman, Townsend 
Garner, R. L. 
Garver, Carl Clifton 
Gilbert, Max 
Glynn, James Douglas 
Goldstein, G. L. 
Goldstine, M. T. 
Goodglick, S. 
Goodloe, Sara 
Gore, Gustava B. 
Gorrell, John E. 
Goss, Henry C. 
Grabowski, Eugene 
Grant, Lucille Ruffe 
Gray, Percy L. 
Greaves, John Percy 
Greenberg, J. 

Grigsby, Kenneth Raymond 
Grin, R. J. 
Gruskin, G. L. 
Guha, M. C. 
Gustafson, P. B. 
Hacker, Geraldine 
Hagerty, C. S. 
Hahn, Pauline E. 
Hall, Florence 



146 



THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO 



Haller, Ida P. 

Halloin, Louis J. 

Hansborough, L. A. 

Hanus, George 

Harrison, Hazel W. 

Hathaway, Millicent L. 

Heller, R. 

Herrick, Sarah L. 

Herrman, Margaret 

Heaney, H. G. 

Hess, Carol L. 

Highsmith, William Cochran 

Hill, Etta G. 

Hill, Marie L. 

Hoen, R. E. 

Hoffstadter, William 

Hohman, Kurt E. 

Huddle, H. B. 

Huston, Harold C. 

Igert, Julia V. 

Ihrke, I. A. 

Jackson, J. W. 

Jeffries, M. E. 

Jenkins, Mary 

Jennings, William Kenneth 

Johannsen, G. T. 

Johnson, C. E. 

Juliano, Amello Anthony 

Kagan, H. 

Kalayjian, Bernard S. 

Kinard, F. W. 

Knapp, Barbara H. 

Knauf, Florence H. 

Knowlton, Kathryn 

Knox, C. Marie 

Koonce, Edward Everett 

Kruse, Harry Dayton 

Kuzmitz, Julia G. 

Larson, L. L. 

Laserovitz, D. 

Lawrence, Zonia W. 

Legault, R. R. 

Leifson, E. 

Lewis, Mary 

Leyers, Rudolph 

Lindgren, L. F. 

Lindquist, J. L. 

Livingston, Jane 

Lloyd, Clarence Lee 

Loo, Y. T. 



Lopez, C. O. 
Lovekin, Osgood Stevens 
Loverde, A. A. 
Lough, S. A. 
Lower, Emory Galen 
McArthur, C. E. 
McBroom, Josephine 
McChesney, E. W. 
McCleery, Thomas S. 
McDougall, Clarice L. 
MacEachern, Katherine 
Maceyewski, Edward S. 
McKaig, N. 
McKay, Hughina 
McKinzie, Walter E. 
McKirdie, Matthew 
McLaughlin, Bernice. 
McLochlen, R. E. 
McMillan, Robert Glen 
Makaroff, W. N. 
Mammoser, Lambert Francis 
Marciniak, Jerome Benedict 
Masure, M. P. 
Matsuyoski, Ernest M. 
Mayerson, Hyman Samuel 
Meigs, F. M. 
Meyers, Thomas T. 
Michael, H. L. 
Midelfart, Peter Albert 
Miner, Simeon K. 
Minster, Harry 
Molz, F. J. 

Montgomery, Mary F. 
Moore, Emily Frances 
Morency, H. L. 
Moretti, John A. 
Morrissey, Michael Martin 
Moser, Ada M. 
Mulder, Arthur G. 
Munday, Betty White 
Murphy, Virgil L. 
Neckerman, Edwin F. 
Newman, Louis B. 
Noll, W. C. 
Noyes, Harold Judd 
O'Brien, Ruth M. 
Odebrecht, Jessie M. 
Olafson, Peter 
Palmer, Dorothy 
Pavlinoff, Helen S. 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOLS 



147 



Paynter, Harrison S. 
Peterson, A. K. 
Phillips, Francis J. 
Pierson, Lester H. 
Pinkston, J. O. 
Piscitelli, V. J. 
Pittman, Martha S. 
Polito, A. E. 
Poppens, H. H. 
Prohaska, J. V. 
Radner, D. B. 
Raskin, J. 
Rasmusen, Esther 
Redden, Edward J. 
Rickelman, R. J. 
Roberts, Brockway 
Roberts, D. A. 
Robinson, Sanford Kenneth 
Robinson, Una L. 
Rolfe, D. T. 
Roll, L. R. 
Rosbash, D. O. 
Ross, Neldo G. 
Rothschild, R. 
Rubovitz, F. E. 
Rundle, Iris Ruth 
Ryder, R. R. 
Samuels, L. T. 
Santiago, Simeona 
Saunders, Alice D. 
Schachter, R. J. 
Schattenberg, Herbert J. 
Schlegel, Karl William 
Schour, I. 
Schwartz, B. 
Seevers, C. H. 
Selton, B. M. 
Seron, Vaheh 
Shaffer, Myrtle 



Shanklin, William Mathias 

Shumway, Norman Price 

Simon, Kona 

Singer, Charlotte 

Skeen, Augusta 

Slaughter, J. E. 

Solomon, E. J. 

Solomon, F. R. 

Stimson, H. R. 

Stukey, G. C. 

Stuppy, George W. 

Sullivan, Florance L. 

Swan, Helen S. 

Tabaka, F. B. 

Tarlow, Virginia S. 

Thomas, Berger 

Thrift, Chester B. 

Thuermer, A. H. 

Tipler, R.J. 

Von Millister, R. 

Wadsworth, M. 

Walker, W. O. 

Washburn, R. H. 

Washington, J. C. 

Weil, A. M. 

Weiner, S. 

Webb, Alberta Pasch 

Wentz, Vida B. 

Wessel, John Peter 

Whitelaw, M. J. 

Wilber, Gertrude Helen 

Williams, W. W. 

Wilson, Clifford C. 

Wright, C. L. 

Wynekoop, Frances Catherine 

Yang, P. S. 

Yates, Theodore Markland 

Yochem, Donald E. 

Yofel, M. T. 



UNCLASSIFIED STUDENTS TAKING CLINICAL COURSES 

JUNIORS 

Alcorn, Marshall Wells, s, Chicago. 
Baker, Dan Dysart, s, Chicago. 
Edahl, Edwin M., s, Chicago. 
Garrett, Roy P., s, Chicago. 
Jaeger, Ruth Emilie, s, Chicago. 
Koff, Salmon Arthur, s, Chicago. 
Labraico, Adelina Florence, s, Chicago. 
Osmena, Emilio, sp, Philippine Islands. 
Silverman, Harold Edward, s, Chicago. 



148 



THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO 



Sokolowski, Felix Walter, s, Chicago. 
Young, Louis Glide, s, Taylorville. 

SENIORS 

Kramer, Willard Edwin, s, Oil City, Pa. 

Leighton, J. W., w, Chicago. 

Levis, John W., s, Chicago. 

Levitt, Louis Leo, s, Chicago. 

Mastri, Aquil, s, Chicago. 

Moore, Lawrence M., s, Benton. 

Scheidt, Walter Charles, a, Ohio City, Ohio. 

Summers, Charles R., s, Chicago. 

POST-GRADUATE STUDENTS 
Aleshire, Irma, s, a, w, sp, Carthage. 
Beckman, Isaac Harry, s, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. 
Beher, Raymond, a, w, Chicago. 
Berke, Samuel D., s, sp, Chicago. 
Botts, Howard Lester, s, a, Seattle, Washington. 
Brandenburg, Kenneth C, s, a, w, Chicago. 
Cunningham, Terrence Thomas, a, w, sp, Seattle, Washington. 
Curry, Hiram, a, w, sp, Lakewood, Ohio. 
Curry, Louis Thomas, s, Waterloo, Iowa. 
Doran, Frank, s, Grand Rapids, Michigan. 
Dougherty, Clifford Lester, s, a, w, sp, Marengo. 
Duncan, Perry Emory, s, a, w, sp, Chicago. 
Fuerste, Frederick, s, a, w, sp, Proctor, Minnesota. 
Good, Palmer, s, a, w, sp, River Forest. 
Greaves, John P., s, a, w, Northfield, Minnesota. 
Greene, Lois Dixon, a, w, sp, Highland Park. 
Guibor, George P., w, sp, Chicago. 
Horick, Edward Joseph, s, a, w, sp, Woodstock. 
Jacobs, Milton, s, Elgin. 
Miller, Joseph Edward, s, Mexico, Mo. 
Reeder, James Stogsdill, s, a, w, sp, Chicago. 
Skolnik, Edward A., s, a, w, sp, Chicago. 
Stoll, Henry Godfred, s, a, w, sp, Chicago. 
Sutherland, James Stanley, s, a, w, sp, Tacoma, Washington. 
Vanderleek, Peter, s, a, Moline. 
Wallner, Linden Joseph, w, sp, Chicago. 
Yonker, William J., s, a, w, sp, Chicago. 

SUMMARY OF ATTENDANCE FOR THE YEAR 1928-29 





Men 


Women 


Total 


First and second-year and South Side third year, 
less duplicates 


197 
123 
196 

207 
17 

25 


20 
10 
19 

64 
2 

2 


217 


Third year, less duplicates 


133 


Fourth year, less duplicates 


215 


Special students taking courses in fundamental 

branches 
Practitioners and unclassified students taking 

clinical courses 


271 
19 

27 


Post-graduate students taking clinical courses . . . 




Total 


765 


117 


882